Chromebooks in the Classroom!-Sorry so vague.

Discussion in 'General Education' started by LiterallyLisa, Aug 1, 2015.

  1. LiterallyLisa

    LiterallyLisa Companion

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Messages:
    107
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 1, 2015

    Let me start out by saying that I am soo excited that my district has been given this opportunity (we don't get alot). All students will have their own Chrome book at school with the option to take home in the future!!

    My school will get devices this year, with other schools in the district to follow the next two years.

    The exciting/scary thing is, I will be piloting the program in my classroom. (2 teachers per grade level will have students that have chromebooks assigned to them. The hope is that every classroom will be able to use the chromebooks after winter break)

    I will attend tons of PD, and a retreat with fellow coworkers on our 1:1 team and come up with a vision, a plan for implementation, goals, rules, worst case scenarios/solutions, etc. We will also be attending PD on Canvas, the learning management system we will be using (with Google Classrooms as well.)

    As I begin to implement this technology into my own classroom, I will have to plan and provide PD for my fellow coworkers.

    Again, very exciting and scary for me! I am not very outgoing, keep to myself, but am very passionate about what I do. I get compliments on my teaching, and have had a great first 2 years. I guess the point of this long post is because I am not confident in the aspect of training a peer or being in charge of something that as of right now I know very little about.

    I know this is not very specific at all... :sorry: and I will probably be back many times this month when I get even more information that brings up actual questions...but...

    For those of you who teach in or have taught in schools where each child had a device:

    Did teachers buy in? How did admin get them to do so?
    What does it look like in your classroom? How often do they use them? what for? (specific projects, note taking if they choose, etc)
    Does anyone use Canvas? Like it? Hate it?
    Any advice at all would be helpful.

    :thanks:
     
  2.  
  3. DrgnJones

    DrgnJones Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2015
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 1, 2015

    I just got hired for my first teaching job and the principal told me that all the students are getting chromebooks at my school as well. I'm lateral entry, so I haven't gotten to observe how any other teachers use them, but I was hoping to have the students use them for online journals/blogs and discussion boards. I would like to take advantage of them to eliminate as much paper usage as I can.
     
  4. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,003

    Aug 2, 2015

    We don't have 1 to 1, but I have been in a very similar situation as you: a third year teacher who is in charge of training the rest of the staff to use technology in the classroom.

    I took on tech responsibilities and oversaw the purchasing and set up of hundreds of Chromebooks for our school as well as managing the Google Apps infrastructure for our school.

    It really is daunting to be a newer teacher, teaching things to teachers who have been teaching for decades, but they really are new at it and need assistance. It probably doesn't help that you don't fully have experience in it yourself.

    Some tips:

    1. If you run a PD, make sure your school/district doesn't have some kind of thing where if they're logged in on their computers in their classroom, they can't log into other computers. That happened my first PD and it was a trainwreck. Half the teachers didn't bother to go back to log out, we were waiting for those who did, and it was ick.

    2. Not all teachers are going to buy in. It's simply the way it is. Trying to force them is not going to help, but at the same time, that doesn't mean that you shouldn't be proactive in pushing the use of technology.

    3. There are a lot of teachers who will say how awesome the technology is, and how much they're looking forward to using it, but then never actually use it. The best way to get around this is to plan with each teacher, or give them time to plan during a PD, a specific lesson where Chromebooks (and apps or activities on the internet) could be used to enhance the lesson, and give them homework to report back how it went at a future PD.

    4. You will get teachers who pick up tech skills at the drop of a pin, and teachers who can be told how to log into their school account 20 times and STILL forget how to do it. It's a good idea to plan your PD to meet all levels and differentiate just like you might do for your students. We found that things were a bit more effective when we split our staff into two groups: those who wanted to learn the basics, and those who wanted to learn more advanced things. Teachers are pretty good at determining which group they belong in by themselves, so we just leave both groups open to whoever wants to join in.

    One to one is not feasible for us, as we don't have enough money for devices for every student, a way to manage them when they go home, and we can't ensure that every family has access to wifi. It's not equitable in short, so it may be different for us than for you, but I've found that I don't use Chromebooks that often.

    If I feel that using the internet would enhance a lesson, such as during projects where they should research something, or use an online simulation of a physics concept, create an online presentation to share with the class, or maybe during an assessment, then I will break out the Chromebooks. But for 90% of my lessons, we go tech free (apart from the tech that I use to present things). I believe the 10% that we do use it for, is valuable enough to have spent the money on the Chromebooks, especially since they're available for any subject area that wants to use them, but I wouldn't force the idea that all teachers NEED to use technology.

    It's a good tool to have for teachers that are comfortable using it, but not something that will 'revolutionize' your teaching unless you were a revolutionary teacher to begin with. It's good to tell teachers that when you begin presenting to them. Many of them view technology as the next 'new' thing they're forced to implement. Portraying it as a tool they are OPEN to use and only when a lesson would become better for it, is a good way to open up the idea to them about using tech.

    Kids will have fun with it either way. If you use them often enough, they get just as bored with computers as with pencil and paper activities.

    I use computers most often with my engineering/digital literacy elective (for obvious reasons). It gives me an outlet to experiment with digital lessons in a more free-form way. We've done all kinds of things like creating videos, podcasts, presentations, using CAD software, programming, photo-editing, etc.

    Students who have learned these skills in my class have gone on to use these skills in other classes during projects and such, which I think is the best way to use it with kids: present them with a lot of digital (and non-digital) tools, and they can choose which one they want to use to best communicate their project.

    My science class will always be a science class, and I will not waste time during it teaching my students how to video edit, or to practice their typing skills. I just have too much content to teach. Don't expect subject area teachers to use digital activities that require a lot of prior instruction to students on how to use them.
     
  5. LiterallyLisa

    LiterallyLisa Companion

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Messages:
    107
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 3, 2015


    I love this, and I think it would really speak to the ones who are skeptical or uncomfortable right now. Many have been around to witness many failed fads of education, so I can already see them rolling their eyes and smirking at the 1:1 buzzwords. Not to my face now probably, but I know it will happen sometime. It will be a challenge, but I am very excited to try. Thanks for the advice :)
     
  6. fjaravata

    fjaravata Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2014
    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    13

    Aug 12, 2015

    Hi Lisa,
    In our 1:1 iPad school (using Google Apps for Ed), our admin helped create a safe environment that encourages teachers to use the iPad. Now, we also have laptops, and teachers do prefer that. If the teachers don't like the iPad, it's okay.

    To hep encourage iPad use, we help (I'm a Educational Innovation Coordinator) teachers by identifiying parts of their curriculum where tech can help. Not replace, but can help.

    So, we start small projects primarily using my favorite app, the camera, for video/slideshow interviews, explanations etc. Having students create movies using iMovie or Greenscreen, screencasts using Explain Everything, songs/podcasts using Garageband etc. These projects are powerful as we emphasize to our students the importance to writing the screenplay and "pitching" their ideas to the teacher for approval. It does not have to long, a 1-3 min. video is great!

    Notetaking, we have our students choose what they like best.... about half seem to like writing in a paper notebook with pencil which we like, and they can take a picture of their notes and upload to their Google Drive. (i'm a big believer in using the pencil/pen with sketchnotes).

    Sorry for the very quick, maybe incoherent reply. But I can go on in more detail later if you want. Good luck!

    Fred
     
  7. LiterallyLisa

    LiterallyLisa Companion

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Messages:
    107
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2015

    Our admin is doing a great job of doing some of these things an I know it is going to make a difference for many of the teachers.

    Those are some really great tips for beginners-the kids might even know more about making videos than my teachers and they would love that (the teachers might not-but it could definitely be a positive experience for the "expert")
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. ally06
Total: 266 (members: 2, guests: 240, robots: 24)
test