choosing goals - how do YOU decide?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by special_teacher, Jan 14, 2009.

  1. special_teacher

    special_teacher Rookie

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    Jan 14, 2009

    I teach a self-contained class, and most of my kids will be self-contained next year, so (very soon) I have to choose all goals for all subjects for next school year. It's always frustrating to me because where I teach, you just arbitrarily choose goals from a huge book of every goal imaginable. Is it the same way everywhere? If so, (or if not), please share your strategies on choosing goals for your students. It's very challenging to be able to select enough goals to cover their individual needs, but not to go overboard with way too many.

    Any thoughts or advice?
     
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  3. bethechange

    bethechange Comrade

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    Jan 14, 2009

    What level/disability do you teach?

    When you say "all subjects," what do you mean by that? All areas of need? Or all academic subjects?
     
  4. mamitche

    mamitche New Member

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    Jan 14, 2009

    I tend to pick them on in two ways.
    The first is through observation. Many of my guys need goals for organization and focus - both come from observation.
    The second is through looking at assignments and formal assessment weakness areas. Although I am not a big fan of high stakes testing I have found that the results I have access to can provide me with wonderful information to make into goals (Math goal - specifically needs help on algebraic thinking, number sense, etc.)

    As I am new to ESE I am sure that my goal making methods will get better, but for now these two seem to work very well. I am interested to see how everyone else makes them =D
     
  5. Teach96

    Teach96 Comrade

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    Jan 14, 2009

    You have a book to pick from. Mine all come from my head somewhere. I do use the Brigance as an informal assessment if I'm unsure as to where to go next from their current classroom data collection. We are trying to put together a goal bank for the Moderate/Severe program in my district but that's a huge task to take on for "after hours".
     
  6. special_teacher

    special_teacher Rookie

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    Jan 15, 2009

    I teach a class of students 5 - 7 years old. Four are autistic, and the rest are varying levels of cognitively impaired, most with ADHD.

    I have to pick goals for all academic areas, but I always include other areas of need like social/emotional and communication.
     
  7. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Jan 15, 2009

    My last school district used the CLASS system. It was very helpful. It had assessments to determine what levels your students were on in various areas (across the curriculum) and it gave goals that corresponded to their areas of weakness. The cool thing was you could fill out the assessments and track progress (if they are in your program from ages 5-7 you could see how they progress throughout your time with them, etc.) Here's the link to the website:
    http://www.classplus.com/products_autism.htm
    The scoring guides describe the different skills, etc.

    My current school uses the PACE math assessment, the Leaf & McEachin Imitation Skills Checklist, and the ABLLS (Assessment of Basic Language and Learning Skills. These are helpful tools to see where the child is in their learning.

    I would suggest finding some different assessments to see where your students are, rather than randomly selecting goals from a goal bank.

    Perhaps your state has released tests from a while back - the modified ones for the special education students. Before all of the NCLB stuff, there were state tests that were on the level of the student's ability, rather than his/her grade level - so you could have a 5th grader taking a 1st grade test. I know TX has some of these released State Developed Alternative Assessments from a few years back. You could see if your students are able to perform any of the Kinder skills on the test. The skills they're unable to perform, they could become goals for the IEPs. I don't know about your district, but in our school - we have to list our reasoning for goals (assessments that were administered to determine the appropriateness of the goals).

    I'm sure you could probably find some assessments online as well.

    Here's a link to the released TX tests that might help you pinpoint some skills that meet state standards. Maybe your state has something similar on their website.

    http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/student.assessment/resources/release/sdaa/index.html

    This would be for more academic skills rather than functional/life skills, etc.

    Good luck!
     
  8. Chokita

    Chokita Comrade

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    Jan 15, 2009


    Do you know about the Alternate CUrriculum for students with moderate to severe disabilities adapted by California Special Education Administrators of County Offices (so called SEACO)?
    http://www.ccsesa.org/index/subCommittees.cfm?cid=105 (go to Training Materials).

    It comes in 2 huge binders: one blue and another yellow, it has alternate standards, goals across different areas, assessment forms,etc. (the link above has exerpts from the books).
     
  9. Chokita

    Chokita Comrade

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    Jan 15, 2009

  10. Teach96

    Teach96 Comrade

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    Yes, I've have a copy but it's not really a curriculum/scope-sequence
     
  11. Chokita

    Chokita Comrade

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    Jan 15, 2009

    Yea, it's not a curriculum, but it has a goal bank. You said your goals come from your head.
    Well, anyways, we are required to align the goals with the alternate standards from this guide. Sorry, maybe I used the wrong word in my previous post - it's not a curriculum, it's a guide.
     

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