Child with SLD, Communication disorder won't stay in seat

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by miss_ali1984, Oct 11, 2010.

  1. miss_ali1984

    miss_ali1984 Companion

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    Oct 11, 2010

    Friends-
    One of the children in my regular ed classroom with special needs will not stay in his seat during instruction and ESPECIALLY independent work. It is very difficult. Because he has communication disorder, it is hard to get him back to his seat with words, so many times I will have to get up from my spot wherever I am and get him into his seat.

    I have tried giving him a classroom buddy, but that just agitates him. I have tried taking him with me to the back table where I do small group instruction during every activity, but that has made him too dependent on me and now he won't even get in line for P.E. or Lunch by himself.

    I am kind of at my wits end with this. I love him and want him to learn, but at this point I am starting to sacrifice some of the learning of the other 21 students in my class. Any ideas on how I can help him to function in the regular ed classroom?
     
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  3. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Oct 11, 2010

    Use a visual prompt to help him get back in his sit (i.e. a picture of a boy in the process of sitting down in a seat)

    Has he been able to express in any manner WHY the buddy agitates him? Is it the student in particular, or him not accepting help?

    What is the SLD? And I assume the student has difficulty communicating verbally?

    Ask the special education teacher for help.

    Also, try to get him on a visual schedule if possible.
     
  4. miss_ali1984

    miss_ali1984 Companion

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    Oct 11, 2010

    I've got him on a visual schedule and am working on visual signals. I really hope this helps.

    When I give him a classroom buddy, he begins to repeat various quotes from Spongebob episodes and laughs hysterically. He will also begin to make a slurping sound with his mouth very quickly, which usually means that he's become over stimulated. I think that one of the reasons he becomes overstimulated is that the classroom buddy tries to get him into his seat and help him in the manner that they would any other friend - by using a large amount of words, and that isn't helping him. He has had several classroom buddies and none of them can really help him the way he needs.

    SLD is specific learning disorder. To be honest, I'm not really sure what that means other than that his accommodations are very similar to that of an autistic child. He also has moderate ADHD, which I realize can impair his ability to stay seated.

    Anyhow, I will try the visual cues and see if that helps. The speech specialist is making me some as we speak.
     
  5. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Oct 11, 2010

    Ah. So his SLD is probably in the realm of executive function.

    Try seeing if you can try to get the student to cue you in, quietly, when he is overstimulated.

    Then just let him calm down for a few minutes at his desk, then ask him to continue his work.

    Give him the same amount of work, but in smaller chunks, to not overstimulate.
     
  6. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Oct 11, 2010

    I would suggest a visual approach to his scheduled time in the seat.

    i.e. when is he expected to sit, for how long, etc.
    Perhaps you could have a visual timer on his desk that will elapse time and show him how much longer he must remain seated.
    Another option is to have a visual schedule or checklist of what is expected to be completed, this way he knows "I have to do this... this... and this... then I can get up!" (If he's a rusher, the timer option might be better!) If he's high enough cognitively, you can even give him a digital timer with each activity on the list, something like this:
    1. Read silently (5 minutes)
    2. Complete worksheet (5 minutes)
    3. Centers (5 minutes)
    (this would be for a kid who was able to handle this...)

    Just a few ideas.
     
  7. miss_ali1984

    miss_ali1984 Companion

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    Oct 12, 2010

    I will be happy to try to implement this! Maybe I could write how many minutes left under his visual schedule and use the timer. His schedule just has the times on it. Anyway, good thoughts. :)

    Bros, you are right, they did talk about executive functioning problems in his ARD.
     

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