Child with diabetes

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by tgtbtj, Aug 11, 2013.

  1. tgtbtj

    tgtbtj Companion

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    Aug 11, 2013

    Hi all, I was hoping someone on here can help clear up some questions. Our school is starting school this coming Monday and a mom approached me on parent night letting me know that her child has diabetes and that she would need to have her blood/sugar level checked daily before lunchtime. Now the problem is that our school does not have a nurse and I have zero experience doing this. Can anyone one here tell me what would be necessary in order to check a child's blood/sugar level? Can anyone do it, do I need to be certified? Do I need to have the mother sign a liability form? I hope you guys can help :help:
     
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  3. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    If the child is old enough, she can do it herself. It's a fairly simple process. You swipe the fingertip with an alcohol pad. Let the alcohol dry so it doesn't hurt as much. You use a device with a lancet that pricks the finger and then touch the end of the test strip that is inserted into a meter. The meter will give you a number. Any treatment will depend on that number. The mom should have that info for you. You'll need a used sharps container to put the used lancets and needles if she has to have insulin.

    If you have to do the testing for her and especially if you have to administer insulin, I'd ask for training so you feel more confident. Since it involves blood, you'd have to follow blood born pathogen protocols.
     
  4. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    You need to be given more info!

    As far as giving shots, no...I will not do that and would go so far as to say I could not do it because of various phobias and issues. Every school needs a nurse based on my experiences as there are too many severe needs. I don't know how we survived without one growing up, but now we have students with feeding tubes and other serious needs that should be addressed by a trained medical professional.
     
  5. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Who usually dispenses medicine? Is there a director? It's a huge liability issue and I don't think the classroom would be a good place to do it. You need to supervise the class and it takes some thinking to manage blood sugar.
     
  6. geoteacher

    geoteacher Devotee

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    What is your school nurse saying about this? He/she is the expert. Ours handles any questions about medication or illness.
     
  7. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    Are you at a school or a small center?

    If it is a school, even if they don't have a nurse, there is a district nurse who would tell you protocol and rules and train you. This should have been done already.

    This could be a life-threatening situation so I don't understand why the parent wouldn't have explained this to the school and made sure you were properly trained....is the child on a pump or will you need to give injections? Does the family bring food so you know it is the proper number of carbs, or are you supposed to know what to feed the child properly? What about days you may have special treats?

    If this is a small center, you need to find out licensing rules about the issue. Do you have a director who dispenses medications?

    Imo, the parent should stay the first day to train you. Good luck - it sounds like there is a lot to learn.
     
  8. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Even though I think they should, not all districts have a nurse. We had one at our high school for a few years, but then her position was cut and the entire district was without any sort of nurse.

    But I agree completely...I can't believe the OP hasn't been provided adequate information.
     
  9. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I personally wouldn't want to accept responsibility for checking blood sugars, administering shots, or doing anything involving needle/lancet use on any sort of regular basis. I don't have the proper training for that. I would talk to the administrator/director and let them know that they will need to contact the parent and come up with a plan that didn't involve me.
     
  10. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    I doubt that is an option. I can imagine a really bad scenario where a child experiencing a blood sugar low or high is sent to the office and collapses on the way. As the teacher, I would want to be trained and have the means to help a child in the classroom. What if the nurse or health clerk is absent or at lunch? What if you are on a field trip? I may not like changing diapers, or giving breathing treatments, or monitoring a fragile child with heart defects, or dealing with a child with swallowing issues who vomits all the time, but I do it because that is part of my job to help keep children safe and healthy.
     
  11. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    "...on any sort of regular basis" is what I said.

    Handling things in an emergency or on a field trip is one thing. Being the primary medical provider is quite another.

    In neither situation would I ever give any medical care for diabetes without being adequately trained.
     
  12. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    This is just another example where a teacher's role has expanded beyond what is reasonable. Just one more hat to wear. A bandage, a bloody tooth, and an emergency where insticts kick in and you do whatever you can...sure. But adding needles to her daily list of responsibilities? I'm not sure how people feel this is best for the child and fair to the teacher. Again, I wouldn't do it.
     
  13. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    How were things handled last year? I would check with last year's teacher to see how they handled things.
     
  14. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    This seems to be preschool. There may not have been a previous teacher.
     
  15. mkbren88

    mkbren88 Cohort

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    At my old charter school, we did not have a nurse. Our secretary was our "nurse" (she was a certified nurse in another state, but didn't have credentials in our state to practice, so no one could know she was an actual nurse). We had a 4th grade student who was diagnosed with diabetes during the school year. She had to be responsible for all of her own testing- the school could not take on the liability or responsibility of testing her. Mom came in for the first week or so to help her get adjusted. She left after the school year to attend a school that could better meet her medical needs.

    I agree that mom needs to come in and offer training, or even come in at lunch time to help administer the testing if need be. That is not a responsibility that I would be willing to take on. Too much liability.
     
  16. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    :thumb:
     
  17. tgtbtj

    tgtbtj Companion

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    I am at a private school, very small. We have a person that administer medication to the students but she is not a nurse.
     
  18. paperheart

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    I would go to your P and insist a district-level health services or other administer determines a plan of action that does not require you to do the checking.
     
  19. tgtbtj

    tgtbtj Companion

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    Aug 11, 2013

    Thank you all for your comments and suggestions. I too agree that I don't feel comfortable taking on this responsibility on my own and I certainly don't want to be held liable if something happens. By the way I work at a private/ Catholic school. I'm amazed this parent didn't ask these questions when she came in to register her child! I think I'm going to tell my P that I will not do any type of blood/sugar testing without training first. I'm just worried about this and like many of you said I don't feel that it should be my responsibility. I want to know exactly what I need to do in an emergency situation but not have to take this on on a regular basis. This is also the child's first year here so I'm not sure how they did things at her other school, I'll have to ask mom tomorrow. Ugh I'm nervous as it is about the first day of school and now this! Thanks all!
     
  20. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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  21. tgtbtj

    tgtbtj Companion

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    Thank you I also looked up the laws and regulations and now I know exactly what is required under Texas law. I already printed out the information and emailed my p. I'm going to go into school early tomorrow and talk to her about it so we're on the same page before we talk to mom. Bottom line I am not going to be held liable if something were to happen. The law requires that at least three of the staff be trained before we can test blood/ glucose levels.
     
  22. sue35

    sue35 Habitué

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    Wow! I would not agree to check blood sugar/give shots/etc. and I am diabetic! Carb counting can be a lot of work and you will have to know what to do/what the child can eat when it's high or low.

    I feel like the mom should send her child to a school that has some type of nurse on hand at all times. I know you can't suggest that but i can't imagine sending a child with a disease that requires daily monitoring to a school where no one is trained for this. This should not be your responsibility.
     
  23. Blue

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    First of all, you have to deal with blood. That would be a red flag for most schools. If you are a public school, you might have to hire a trained medical person to come take the blood sugar.
     
  24. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Maven

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    If there is no nurse then the student should have a health aide. I would also not send my own child to a school with no nurse.
     
  25. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    Then don't move to California. We have health clerks - just glorified office people trained in first aid with one nurse in the district supervising the clerks. High schools have nurses, but not the elementary schools.
     
  26. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Maven

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    I won't! :) I would have to add that if I really had to I would send my child to a school without a nurse but only if he/she did not have major health problems. That is just scary!
     
  27. eyeteach

    eyeteach Rookie

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    A child in my class is diabetic. He can tell when his sugar is high or low. He checks his own sugar. I write down what he eats for lunch and that determines how much insulin he gets. He can actually give himself the shot too once we put the correct amount of insulin in.
     

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