Chemistry ORELA

Discussion in 'Single Subject Tests' started by Innsmouth, Dec 13, 2014.

  1. Innsmouth

    Innsmouth Rookie

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    Dec 13, 2014

    Hello,

    I was a chemistry minor in college, but haven't taken any general chemistry courses in three or four years. I did well in chemistry during college, but it wasn't easy. I intend to take the chemistry ORELA before June when I will hopefully be beginning my MAT program.

    I'm aware there are many variables here, but how many hours per week, and how many weeks, do you expect the average person in my position will need to study to pass the ORELA? Are these chemistry standardized tests notorious for their difficulty?

    Thanks,

    Innsmouth
     
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  3. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Dec 13, 2014

    Since you've got hands-on background, you should find that it comes back to you pretty quickly. The equivalent of an hour a day of solid studying for four weeks is likely to be enough. One of the docs on the ORELA Web site relates the standards that the test covers: have you had a look at that?
     
  4. Innsmouth

    Innsmouth Rookie

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    Yeah, I have actually. I even purchased ORELA's "comprehensive study guide" that contains all the main topics that will be covered on the test. It's about 21 pages of material! I like the idea of being able to complete the test successfully in the short amount of time that you've mentioned, but based upon the study guide it might take a bit longer. It's really unfortunate how I have forgotten to work a lot of these basic chemistry problems. The good news is that yes, it does come back rather quickly.
     
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Dec 13, 2014

    Start, and see how it goes; since ORELA's computer-based, you should be able to shift test dates backward as appropriate. I believe Khan Academy has sprouted a science section; you might see whether the videos there are any help, or Google for lesson plans/videos on the topics that have you goggle-eyed right now.
     
  6. Innsmouth

    Innsmouth Rookie

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    Alright, will do. Thanks for the input. I am thinking a lot of the questions on the exam will be very basic and not so tricky.
     
  7. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    I'll phrase it slightly differently: there will be tricks, but the sort that someone with a basic knowledge will know. Have you ever been in a setting where you could tell someone wasn't an insider because they weren't using the terminology right? It will be something like that.
     
  8. MacGuffin

    MacGuffin Companion

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    Dec 21, 2014

    Because everybody knows the best way to show off your chemistry knowledge is with multiple choice tests! If you mix A and B, do you come up with C or D?
     
  9. Innsmouth

    Innsmouth Rookie

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    Dec 21, 2014

    I'm not sure what you're getting at, but I'm actually glad the test is multiple choice, haha. Easier.
     
  10. MacGuffin

    MacGuffin Companion

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    Dec 23, 2014

    Just a worthless joke, since all the fun in chemistry is the hands on work. But yes, passing is always easier with multiple choice. Do you know, are all of the ORELAs just multiple choice? Any essays anywhere or other goodies?
     
  11. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Dec 23, 2014

    These days, all multiple choice except for (a) whatever writing task is part of the EAS basic-skills test and (b) one question each on the three World Language tests (French, German, Spanish).

    Up until a few years ago, Oregon used CBEST for basic skills, homegrown-and-localized ORELA tests for elementary education, administration, and student/civil rights, and Praxis for all secondary areas. The ORELA elementary test and the administrators' test somewhat resembled most CSET exams in having more than one subtest and including constructed response components. Praxis exams were strictly multiple choice.

    A few years back, ORELA abandoned its own elementary test and most Praxis offerings in favor of Pearson's NES Profile series, which is a program of nationally applicable teacher tests - and, except for the World Language tests, these are multiple-choice only. Of the remaining ORELA tests, the student/civil rights exam is unchanged - it never included constructed responses - but the administrators' exam has shed its constructed response questions.
     

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