chatty kids

Discussion in 'Second Grade' started by lillebe, Sep 7, 2007.

  1. lillebe

    lillebe Rookie

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    Sep 7, 2007

    I need some help. I just finished my 4th day of school and I have cried every single day. My class is SOOOO bad, they don't listen, or do what they're told. I have tried so many different things in the past 4 days and nothing seems to work. We are unable to get through a single lesson/ Everytime I try to teach a lesson we must stop every 2 minutes to get the students attention and to stop them from talking. I have some kids who sit there and do no work at all, and the parents are not cooperative.
    I have tried postive reinforcement, and everything. I'm already the teacher that screams, and I don't want that (especially after the 4th day). I feel like I want to give up.
    Any advice???
     
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  3. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Sep 7, 2007

    Pull the most chatty kid out of the area and away from friends (time out but looking at you/working).

    Tell the kids your expectations at the beginning of EVERY class period before you start along with the consequences. Warn them once. Then start a tally board. If the students earned less than 10 tally points for the day, they earn 5 or 10 minutes of fun time on Friday (this can be educational stuff showcased in games, etc).

    Use proximity and body posture consistently.

    Stop your lesson and don't say a word. Wait for them to notice.

    Be consistent in everything you do. Be proactive and watch what they are doing. Excercise preventive maintence. Look for clues on what this group responds to.

    Remember it is the beginning of the year and you have to train them to get in the habit, know that you mean business and stay with it so they don't think everythings hunky dorey later.
     
  4. lillebe

    lillebe Rookie

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    Sep 8, 2007

    Thanks for the advice. I just keep hearing that the first day of school, or even the first week sets the tone for the year. So I feel that since they are still acting like this after the first week, my year is shot and I'm going to have a year from hell! I just need to keep trying new things to see what works with them. I just don't know if that is going against the whole be consistent thing?
     
  5. looking in ct

    looking in ct Rookie

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    Sep 8, 2007

    This is my first year too and I have very chatty kids as well. I've already moved the desks around several times. I have also sent one student to work at a round table by himself several times. He chats ALL the time, to himself, to others, its ridiculous.

    2 of my very chatty students sit right next to me when we sit at our meeting area.

    I have also practiced a bunch of times, how to line up without talking. I send my line leader and then quiet groups. The second I notice them talking in line, it's back to their desks we go and we try again. It's resulted in some late arrivals to specials and lunch but I don't care. This is much more important right now.

    I also spent Friday morning talking about my expectations again. I modeled how to walk into the room without talking etc...

    The same thing with taking out folders, etc.. and books from our desks. The second I notice them chatting or slamming things on the table, everything goes back into the desk and we try again.

    I felt like things were unraveling as the days progressed so I took these steps to tie things up. I think it made a big difference yesterday. At the end of the day, I complimented them on their hard work, following rules, etc....

    It's a pain in the neck and you feel like you are accomplishing nothing academic wise, but its important and sets the stage for the rest of the year.

    hope this helps!
    good luck!!
     
  6. S Dubb

    S Dubb Comrade

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    Sep 9, 2007

    One word: stopwatch

    Buy a stopwatch and keep it around your neck. I got a cheap one at Target for $5 and it works just fine. Whenever the kids talk, start the watch. When they stop, stop it. Don't tell them you're doing it. Just quietly start it and wait.

    Write how much time they have wasted on the board, and then at recess the class needs to owe you that time. If they waste 3:00, then you send them to recess 3:00 late. While owing you that time they need to be perfectly silent (you might be surprised how quiet they'll be during this time).

    Just make sure that you explain to them that since they have taken your time, you are taking theirs. May sound a little cruel, but it'll certainly get the point across and they should see the fairness in your statement if you present it right. Good luck.
     
  7. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Sep 9, 2007

    I like it!!!!
     
  8. jl2teach

    jl2teach Rookie

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    Sep 9, 2007

    I also teach 2nd grade and have a VERY chatty group this year, as do the other 2 teachers. First thing Monday I would meet with the class and explain your disappointment in the talking last week and tell them the new procedures. Let them know this is a fresh week and hopefully everyone got their talking out last week.

    I am using a FROG management system similar to card turning that allows them to move back into our frog pond during the day if they get their act in order. It seemed to be effective with my most chatty kids last week. I would tell them that I would watch them closely during the next lesson and if they showed good behavior they could move back in. I saw a big improvement during the week.

    Good Luck with whatever changes you make this week.
     
  9. LAH2

    LAH2 Companion

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    Sep 9, 2007

    You could try taking away either recess or any kind of free time if you have it. Try writing the word on the board or using magnetic letters to make the word, and every time you have to stop for the class you take a letter away. Each letter represents a certain amount of minutes they have lost. You could also try a game called "Beat the teacher." Write "Class" and "Teacher" on the board. Every time they get too noisy you get a point, and every time they are working quietly they get a point. See who wins by the end of the day and you could offer some kind of incentive.
    I'm not sure how your desks are arranged, but I also give out group incentives. Whether my students are sitting with their desks in groups or rows, they work together with the other students in their group or row to be the quietest or the best listeners. Last year each group got a small container at their desks and I would walk around and give out pennies to the groups that worked well and take pennies away from noisy groups. This worked very well because they really wanted to earn those pennies. Each month when I moved desks (or even every week if you need to) I would count up the pennies to see which group one. If you make the prize good (a pick from the prize box, lunch with the teacher, a homework pass, etc.) it gets them motivated. Good luck!
     
  10. MissHunny

    MissHunny Comrade

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    Sep 9, 2007

    Last year i had table group incentives. Each table of 4 kids had a cup labeled for them. After every activity or transition I would put a pom pom in the cups of the groups who did work quietly/transitioned well. It got the good ones in each group to really push the others to do the right thing...they would even help each other out when getting out supplies and packing up. On Friday each group would count their pom poms and the table with the most won a prize or had a lunch bunch with me.
     
  11. sundayn

    sundayn Rookie

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    Sep 9, 2007

    I tell the class they can earn 15 minutes of extra recess on Friday. Every time I have to sit them back down for being too loud, taking too much time to do something, etc. they loose a minute from the board. If they do something really well as a class they can earn minutes. The incentive that it is up to themn if they want extra time on Friday. This works well. You can also change it to time off of each days recess.
     
  12. bdteach

    bdteach Companion

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    Sep 9, 2007

    Have you tried establishing procedures?

    Everything I've read and everyone I've spoken to has said you don't teach lessons the first week, but rather spend the time discussing and rehearsing procedures. Though your students are in 2nd grade, they are still new to being students, overall, and this is the first week of school. They need to be reminded of how to behave in school, and to be taught how you will run your class.

    Of course, my class did this the first week and everything was runnning smoothly, but by the end of week three, I'm finding we need to spend some more time going over the procedures again. This happens.

    The important thing is you need to teach them and have them practice how they should behave. Show them examples of what not to do, and then what TO do. They have fun with this too, which makes it more memorable. But you must be consistent or they will never take you seriously.

    One book an administrator gave me was A Salamander is not a Fish by Jim Fay . I've found it very helpful.

    Good luck!
     
  13. bdteach

    bdteach Companion

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    Sep 9, 2007

    Sundayn - the only problem i have with this is that the good kids can't control the kids who don't behave and therefore they're losing out. I'm very curious to see how you (and others) feel about this. I've heard plenty of teachers using whole class incentives and discipline, but I just can't find a way to justify doing it. I know some kids will be affected by others being upset with them, but this year I have one who simply doesn't care about ANYTHING. No one being upset with him is going to change his behavior. Please explain it to me. :)
     
  14. twincheryl

    twincheryl Rookie

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    Sep 9, 2007

    bdteach... i have only used group or whole class incentives once in 16 yrs of teaching... i feel the same way you do... and when i was in school 100 years ago, i can remember always doing what i was supposed to do and being "punished" for what the rest of the class did wrong... i didn't like it at all... so i won't do that to my class now... i remove kids to time out, have a "sign in" log or turn a card system... it does depend on how many offenders you have... move the desks around often and reward the good kids with some kind of incentive... some years i pass out little tickets and draw several at the end of the week for extra computer time or other things they like... doesn't bother me at all to have a negative consequence for someone who doesn't "care"... just make sure that kid is ABLE to comply and there isn't something else going on that needs addressing...
     
  15. Noeliatx

    Noeliatx New Member

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    Sep 16, 2007

    Hi everybody,
    I also have a very chatty group of 20 kids. This is going to be the 5th week of school and I saw very small progress. I tried almost all the suggestions you said, I will try tomorrow moving kids around and taking some recess out that seems the only thing that keeps them quiet at times. I walk around them all the time, using proximity. I am very consistent, and I am adding minutes on the board that I will take away from their recess.When all 2nd grade (4 classes) are outside for recess, my class is in line for 2-5 minutes waiting to play. My concern is, if I could have problems with parents or administratives for doing this almost everyday? Would be one day that this won't happen? My observation (PDAS) day is approaching (2 months) and I am afraid the class won't be ready.
    Noe:(
     
  16. buck8teacher

    buck8teacher Devotee

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    Sep 16, 2007

    I had rowdy bunch in second last year. Something that worked for me was a points system. I had a tally chart in the room on the board it was labeled Miss Buck8teacher on one side and Room 409 on the other.

    The kids got points for following the directions exactly, transitioning well from one activity to the next, particpating in the Phonics Dance, staying on task, not chatting, etc. However, I got points when they didn't do those things. When the class or myself got to a certain number of points, there was a reward involved. If won, it was cursive practice. If they won, they put ideas in a jar and I picked one.

    It worked well, because I was able to emphasis desired behaviors often and example why I earned points.
     
  17. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Sep 16, 2007

    Noeliatx....Try to think of classroom management as a series of solutions rather than one big solution that will solve your dilemma.

    Work on figuring out if the class environment is contributing. Is the seating working for you? What about transition times. Is it set up for success for this particular group of kids? Is there a particular type of lesson or a particular time of day that seems to set them off more? Really get to work on analyzing the issue throughout the day and work from there. You want to set it up so that any other solutions you design have a chance of working because you are helping them reduce temptation. Don't forget to analyze what is actually working.

    Then set a classroom (or even invdivual) reward/consequence plan such as that listed above. Don't stop there though. Go with class management techniques directed by you. For example, walk around the room and linger closer to those who are chatting too much as you keep your lecture going. Stop talking altogether and look at the group who is talking. Raise your hand and wait for them to raise them back (sometimes works). Call on the person who is talking the most. Tell the person who is doing well that you like that they are paying attention (call by name). There are many subtle techniques like these. Most of all, show them who is boss. Be confident. It's all in the delivery.
     
  18. awp0718

    awp0718 Rookie

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    Sep 18, 2007

    When the kids really get to talking keep going and tell students to do something such as write down their favorite color and bring it to you. Reward the kids who do it with a treat. Tell the whole class that from time to time you will reward the students who listen. If they want the reward bad enough I imagine they'll pay closer attention next time.
     
  19. Chevygirl97

    Chevygirl97 Companion

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    Sep 22, 2007

    Same boat

    Mine are VERY loud as well and I have come home crying. I've tried the table points--and it worked. For those tables that didn't need it. I tried the take away their time for wasting mine. Didn't work. What worked for me (finally--today after 3 weeks--) was to put them in an arrangement with the "E-backwards E with an aisle" formation and tell them they were "red team and blue team."

    With half the class competing with the other, it seems to be working. That and benching people at recess (my new secret weapon...!!)

    Music works too. They LOVE music. I have it going on while I'm teaching the whole day, just softer while I'm talking.

    I don't think I mentioned that I have 35.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2007
  20. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Sep 22, 2007

    This seems to be a common among most teachers in every grade level. I know my sister teaches 2nd and she says that they are chatty!!
     

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