Chatty freshmen

Discussion in 'Secondary Education Archives' started by Science_in_NC, Oct 6, 2005.

  1. Science_in_NC

    Science_in_NC New Member

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    Oct 6, 2005

    I am a first year lateral entry teacher. My 4th block class is mainly freshmen, and they are loud and chatty. I have moved students 3 times and am contemplating another move. I have to settle them down every time I turn my back to write on the board. Even when I stand facing them they will continue with their own conversations. Only when I threaten a phone call home do they quiet down. Some of the other students even try to tell the class to quiet down because they are trying to pay attention. I have tried explaining to them that they are being disrespectful and wasting time that they need to learn, because the chatty ones are not doing as well as they think they should be and complain to me when they get a poor grade. I need some ideas as to how to get them quiet and how to keep them quiet. Is it possible?
     
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  3. Mrs. Toby

    Mrs. Toby Rookie

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    Oct 10, 2005

    I too have a very chatty 4th period. It must have something to do with lunch. I teach U.S. History that period and I have resorted to calling and e-mailing the parents. If you say you are going to call you need to do it, if you don't your students will think that they can do whatever they want to because you won't follow up. I too have seen the talkers complaining about their grades and there is only so much you can do if they want to mess around and then blame you for their grade.
     
  4. Mrs.Bick

    Mrs.Bick New Member

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    Oct 10, 2005

    chatty grade nine

    I too teach grade nine and have found that chatty students need to verbalize their learning.Early on in the year we talk about what types of discussions help our learning and what types hinder it, setting limits for discussion. I then build in opportunities for them to talk about the topic being taught by asking them to verbally brainstorm or share an idea or answer with a neighbor This small thing takes away my frustrations and gives them an oppotunity for thinking aloud. I might say "Have a discussion with your neighbor for 1 minute about..." then I ask them to share their responses. If you listen in on the conversations and ask for specific feedback the students get that you mean business when it comes to meaningful talk in the classroom.
    The biological predispostion to communicate with others is too powerful to fight so we have to create ways to use it to our advantage. Good luck.
     
  5. dehabel

    dehabel Rookie

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    Oct 11, 2005

    I am also a first year teacher. I teach English to all Freshman. They are chatty, chatty, chatty - and so am I. What a dreadful combination. I try to connect things that are important to them to the texts we are reading, however it gets out of hand way too often. If anyone has a magical cure, please share!
     
  6. Mrs. C.

    Mrs. C. Rookie

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    Oct 11, 2005

    not talkative enough!

    I have the opposite problem with my predoninately freshman group. They are too quiet - most of the time! I have to drag answers out of them. The principal evaluated that class today and I think he was very surprised at how quiet they were.

    I would rather have a little more chatter then nothing at all!

    I will add - my fourth hour - after lunch - is far too rowdy.
     
  7. wiccachyk

    wiccachyk New Member

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    Oct 12, 2005

    One idea that has worked for me is to write a Talking IS... list and hang it in a prominent place. I got this idea from another teacher website and it has worked pretty well. The premise is that sometimes teens don't realize they are "talking" (yes it sounds stupid but I have argued with enough chatty girls for it to make since to me). The list should go something like: No talking means do not answer your finds question, do not ask your friend a question, whispering is still talking, etc. If I can find the site again I will post it.
     
  8. danabell

    danabell New Member

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    Oct 12, 2005

    We have an excellent assertive discipline plan at our school and most of my friends in other school systems have borrowed this.
    We have 6 basic school rules.
    1 Obey all ETCA rules (found in handbook)
    2.Be seated and working when tardy bell rings (unexcused tardies are not acceptable)
    3. Have supplies, homework, etc...
    4. Raise hand to speak or leave seat
    5. Leave room clean, organized
    6. Be respectful and courteous to others at all times.

    Every teacher has a
    BLUE BOOk in classroom.
    If a student is not following assertive disc. plan they must sign the blue book and record violation.

    first signing is a demerit and warning
    second is demerit, detention, phone call home
    third is demerit, detention, call home, and N on report card
    fourth is demerit, detention, call home, U on report and out of extracurricular for 6 weeks
    fifth is automatic referral to office.

    demerits are cumulative not based on type of offense.

    Flagrant behavior is auto to office.

    I have no ongoing discipline problems. I don't even have to say more than "you will need to sign my blue book" Our admin, including athletics is 100% supportive.

    STudents start with clean slate at new 6 weeks.

    We also have online grades, etc... so I can post every signing and send email to parent and carbon copy to my principal.

    Actually many students walk in the room and say "Mrs. Wade, I need to sign the book, I forgot my homework....."
     
  9. kayakay

    kayakay Rookie

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    Oct 23, 2005

    I just learned of this technique and plan to try it on Monday. I have chatty Sophomores and Juniors. We had a teacher's conference. The teacher claimed that when he played Frank Sinatra C.D.s or any other music he enjoyed that wasn't to the liking of his students, they would become quiet and he would stop the music. Sort of a reverse psychology technique. I am gathering some Nat King Cole and a bit of Mantovani for tomorrow!!!!
     
  10. kayakay

    kayakay Rookie

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    Oct 23, 2005

    I liked the idea of lowering your voice when they raise theirs, and waiting for them to become quiet. They cannot stand silence, and when the waiting becomes excessively long they become agitated. I also use bells and whistles. The whistle is a permanent fixture on a lanyard around my neck. The bell is on my desk and will bring the class to order. I have stopped fights in the hall with my whistle, as well as public displays of affection (PDAs).
     
  11. Mom2Sarah

    Mom2Sarah Rookie

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    Oct 30, 2005

    Have you tried time for time. This works really well for High schoolers. What you do is get a stop watch. Then everytime they are talking and you can't teach you simply start the time running. When they stop talking stop the watch. If they start again later you start again later. See where I'm going? Then they have to stay that long with you after class, after school, at lunch, you decide. This way there is no paperwork, no charts, no discipline reports just a stop watch. My kids HATE IT! Also you don't have to say a thing you simple push a button!
     
  12. DRBenjamin

    DRBenjamin Rookie

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    Nov 10, 2005

    I think these are all great ideas. I talked to my fellow staff members about my chatty kids problem and told them what I wanted to do. Every time I had to stop and wait for them to listen, I would quietly watch the clock. Wait. Watch. At the end of the period, when the bell rang, I held them in my class for however long they wasted of our class time. Within a week, they were much better. I asked my fellow staff members to give them unexcused tardies and to help me in that manner. They all agreed and voila! You need to establish that there's a time for them to talk, a time for you to talk, and a time for quiet so that they can listen. I'm a talker; but, I also know that it's *rude* to speak while someone else is talking. The sooner you can get that across to them, the sooner the whole school and college professors will be able to appreciate the benefits. Hang in there! :)
     
  13. kayakay

    kayakay Rookie

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    Nov 12, 2005

    Correcting the chatterers?

    I tried the time thing with my "chatties" but I became a record keeper. Another online suggestion was to use a stopwatch. Yet one more suggestion was to play music they don't like. I tried, but they liked all the alternate music I played.....even the accordion polkas that I played along with on my classroom accordion! There was one more technique I employed, but it is too gruesome to mention here. It was something visual using my overhead projector and a staple remover.
     
  14. Beau1

    Beau1 Rookie

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    Nov 14, 2005

    Lowering your voice as they raise theirs works well in the classroom. 9th graders are inquisitive by nature and rely on the gossip line for their infor. Any voice they here they try to derive information for their social circuit from it. It works well while coaching also. I would highly reccoment this technique.
     
  15. BMoreCityTeach

    BMoreCityTeach Rookie

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    Nov 14, 2005

    I can relate. I have the freshmen from HELL. I've found that I can change some seats to keep some of them quiet.

    Mostly what I do-and granted, this is really mean-is I'll stop what I'm doing and wait. Sometimes I will ask them to share with the class-and will not continue class until they do; other times I'll embarass them and say "I'm sorry that your education is interfering with your personal life; by all means, continue. I'll wait." That usually shuts them up. Other times I'll call them out and tell them, "Look, you're already failing my class, you cannot AFFORD to be talking. Shut up and pay attention."

    Keep in mind, I teach in the inner-city, so this is "tough love." I don't LIKE doing it, but even veteran teachers (we're talking over twenty years experience) in my school cannot control these kids any other way. Otherwise we just end up spending the whole time disciplining kids and the good kids don't end up learning anything.
     

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