Chatty 9th graders!

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by daisy04, Feb 28, 2007.

  1. daisy04

    daisy04 Rookie

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    Feb 28, 2007

    I'm in my first year of teaching, and I have the joy of teaching 9th graders. There's just a touch of sarcasm there. I enjoy the kids, but I have many who never stop talking!

    If they're talking while I am, I'll usually stop and wait until they quiet down (sometimes in mid-sentence even). I start talking again, and they resume their conversations. I get really tired of stopping when they don't seem to care!

    I've seen all kinds of cutesy ways to manage behavior with little kids, but what about high schoolers? Anyone have ideas they'd be willing to share? Some days I just feel like things are out of control!
     
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  3. Mrs_Goatess

    Mrs_Goatess Comrade

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    Feb 28, 2007

    I have a couple periods that just don't stop; I teach mainly juniors. (They'll get it down to occasional mumbles, but that's a good day.) Honestly, I've modified my lesson plans for those two periods to include as little lecturing as possible. If I can give them something to read, do, or discuss among themselves, I will. I'll have them discuss among themselves and then summarize their thoughts in a paragraph for grading. Honestly, I'd rather work around it than keep banging my head against the wall.
     
  4. smilingteacher

    smilingteacher Rookie

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    Mar 1, 2007

    I'm a sub so I have this problem sometimes. Have you tried to move them? I remind them its rude to talk when I do.

    I ask them if there paying attention. I also tell them how long I will be talking. 5-10 minutes. Discuss. I also offer them the abilty to talk the last minutes if they do not interupt me. Any more suggestion? I would love to hear from the rest of you.


    John
     
  5. daisy04

    daisy04 Rookie

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    The bad thing is, I don't lecture very much anyway. I'm beginning to think that maybe I should. Any time I ask them to work on something, I have to keep prodding them along to keep them on task.
     
  6. rdpega

    rdpega Rookie

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    Mar 7, 2007

    I saw a post on another website where a sub used this technique for middle schoolers, and I think it could work for a 9th grade classroom too. He put two straight backed chairs in the front of the room, within his eyesight. Misbehaving students were warned once, then if the behavior continued, they were moved to the chairs. After 5-10 mins in their new seats, they were asked if they were ready to return to their desks. This teacher claimed this worked nearly everytime! Good luck
     
  7. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

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    Mar 11, 2007

    Typical age...give them 3 warnings and if they don't comply send them out into the hallway to "cool down". Also, pause and create suspense. Give out the "teacher look" along with it.

    Sending them out in the hallway- signals to them that you mean business, gives them alittle bit of time to think and will only harm that person on what they are missing.

    How long are your periods? Have a talk with the group that is causing the trouble and see why they can't seem to keep quiet for an hour.

    NEVER THINGS:

    Showing anger and frustration. This does nothing to help the situation. In fact, it may make the talker anxious and nervous-and cause him/her to talk even more.

    Saying things like "Shut up" or "Keep your mouth shut."

    Interrupting class to reprimand.

    Attempting to belittle or shame the talker, or being sarcastic.

    Punishing the entire class or creating peer pressure.

    Making rules and regulations for the entire class because of this one student.

    Assuming classmates are disturbed by the talker-or acting on such an assumption. Classmates might not even hear.

    Reacting inconsistently-and punishing irrationally.

    Overreacting by immediately rearranging the seating chart or issuing threats or ultimatums.

    Isolating this student. The talker's need for attention or security will not allow his/her personality to take isolation.

    Becoming so frustrated that we say and do things we'll wish we hadn't.

    Failing to look for reasons behind the constant talking.

    Assuming the talking is directed against us personally or against class work, or that the student is uninterested, or that the talking is intended to be disrespectful.

    Assuming there is a short-term solution.

    Allowing talkers to visit after finishing lessons for the day.

    Restricting the talker to the point at which he/she isn't making a contribution at any time.

    Trying to humiliate the talker, calling attention to the behavior, or trying to get the student to be quiet by placing emphasis on the behavior.
     
  8. Nelson

    Nelson New Member

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    Mar 12, 2007

    Ok I'm a teacher of ninth graders as well, and have seen a real lack of impulse control - talking is one of the areas where this is manifest. I like the list from CLZTEACH on what not to do, but I have noticed that not reinforcing my authority causes more students to begin to mis-behave. I have been told that I must have firm and consistent consequences for mis-behavior. As I have tried to do this, it has gotten better. (This is my second year teaching).
     
  9. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

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    Mar 12, 2007


    I am now a first grade teacher, I student taught for 2 years in high school. They really do have lack of impulse control....

    Sometimes you can reprimand without making a big fuss on it by saying phrases like....

    "So-and-so, Are you done?" (this is signaling to the student to get working and really asking them if they completed the assignment. If they did not then they know to get working!)

    "Lets go!" (telling the student(s) to get a move on it in a nice way!)

    "Lets try number 1 together." (getting the student back on topic in a secretive way.)

    "Do you all understand what we should be doing?" (signaling them to get on task.)

    Or you can just say a simple phrase like "Focus" "On task, please"

    You'll be surprised how well they respond to these 'phrases'! ;)
     
  10. koocat008

    koocat008 Companion

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    Mar 13, 2007

    ClZTEACH, I really do like the list of what not to do....I'm in my first year teaching 7th grade, and I seem to be hitting all of the "not to do" stuff. I will have good days and bad days with them..Today being a really bad day.

    I am running out of ideas. Sometimes I'll be in the middle of repremanding, and I'll literally think to myself "am I overreacting??" I think I am losing patience and it is showing on my face and my attitude, and I hate that!! I mean being a teacher is all about being patient, but I don't know where mine is most times with this class. This week is ISAT testing, the kids are crazy after that is done, and I am going crazy myself!!!! arghghghg, I'll notice other teachers not reacting as would I in a given situation, and it ends up backfiring. My problem is not knowing when there really is an issue, or if I am just losing my patience for no reason.....I need an anti-anxiety pill:p (Although I will end this by saying I do love the kids, they are fun and great, most of the time;) )
     
  11. smilingteacher

    smilingteacher Rookie

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    Mar 17, 2007

    I was at my wits end. I am substitute teacher. I taught am a special education English right after lunch and 9th grade. Barley any of the students were doing there work. Many were being disrespectful and not listening to me and talking mid-sentence. One student was jsut taunting another student; I moved him. They still were not doing there work. In a calm assertive tone I finally said. "Ladies and Gentleman, may I have your attention please. I really feel you are disrespecting me. I am working very hard. I will not give up; but I will not tolerate this disrespectful behavior! Now do your work." It worked the students silently read and no more problems. Obviously because its special education they would read get a break and then move on to other activities.

    Sometime you have to let yourself be know and you do not tolerate any crap.
     
  12. trina

    trina Companion

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    Mar 21, 2007

    If your problem is that the whole class is chatty, not just a few that you can target, then you and I share the same problem. I have an 8th grade class that talks- all but 3 of them- constantly. I do something that I think I learned on this website. I draw a box on the board and write above it "Minutes you are staying late for talking" and then when they get too talkative, I just walk over and write .5. If they keep talking I erase and write 1. I've never had to go over 2 minutes. We change classes but in this small school they still have plenty of time left to get to their next class.

    We also have a demerit system, so sometimes I've just buckeld down and written out demerits for everyone who talks. It took a long time but the impact lasted for along time- a week or two. They would get quiet with just the reminder that I have the demerit book on my desk open and ready.
     
  13. daisy04

    daisy04 Rookie

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    I've thought about holding them after class, but they only have 3 min. between classes anyway. They can't afford to lose any time! If I keep them, I'd probably upset other teachers by sending kids in late.

    Plus, even though it is the majority of my kids, I still feel bad punishing the few who always behave themselves.
     
  14. Major

    Major Connoisseur

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    Mar 27, 2007

    These kids aren't just "talking," they are being rude and disrespectful..... No teacher should tolerate rudeness or disrespect... Give them a warning..... one which they understand.... then if they continue with the bad behavior remove them from your classroom.

    Major:)
     
  15. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Major Hunt good advice. What I do is if they start talk as I am teaching or when another student is talking I stop; then I wait for them to stop talking. I will wait for ever and just tell them that whatever time they waste which was supposed to be for classowork will now have to be done at home; I also add in anyone who does not complete it will be written up. This usually stops the talking and if they continue talking just write them up one again.
     
  16. 4thgradewowie!

    4thgradewowie! New Member

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    Hi--I teach fourth grade--and they are chatty too. It's the nature of the beast--so to speak.
    The best way is to just have a procedure for everything and teach the procedure--if they don't do it correctly--have them re-do it until they understand it.
    Works for me great--besides all the whispering--good grief Charlie Brown!
     
  17. Anyalee

    Anyalee Companion

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    What do you do when it is the WHOLE class misbehaving, not just one student you can send into the hallway?
     
  18. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

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    Just simply stop whatever you were doing, and sit back at your desk until everyone stops whatever they are doing. Wait about 2 min until they get the picture. The moment of silence will make it awkward.
     
  19. 4monthcountdown

    4monthcountdown Comrade

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    Yeah, I agree. Just refuse to continue until you have their attention and respect. You're the boss, not them.
     
  20. Anyalee

    Anyalee Companion

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    Mar 29, 2007

    That doesn't work at all....they just keep talking...louder and louder!
     
  21. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

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    Really? How old are they? . . .
     
  22. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

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    How is your seating chart?.......maybe you need to rearrange it.
     
  23. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Mar 29, 2007

    I have been known to find the one or two kids who are doing exactly what I want them to, and reward them somehow, very quietly... a sticker, a "thanks for istting quietly," letting them go to centers, something that's appropriate for the situation. When I do that with my kiddos, the rest of the tend to straighten up right away.

    of course, i teach 3 year olds, so...
     
  24. 4thgradewowie!

    4thgradewowie! New Member

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    Sometimes it seems like nothing works this time of year--they are very ready for summer--it seems like they know we're tired. LOL
    When I taught high school English--the best thing I could do was reward them with 15 minutes free time at the end of the period if they used all appropriate procedures.
    Anyone and I mean anyone (start with one--always start with one or two then work your way to everyone--they catch on about the 5-6'th one) that breaks procedure--say "I'm sorry you are not following the procedure for working--please sit down and work with no talking. I would hate for you to miss your free time at the end of the period. Just keep doing this for the whole week--they'll catch on. At this age, they try to wear you down--just keep calm and repeat procedure.
    BE at that door when they come in--only let them come in ONE at a time--and don't let anyone come in till they are quiet--send them out one at a time if you have to--it's easier to set the mood this way.
    Let one in and make them sit down and start on the assignment RIGHT THEN with no talking-keep letting them come in one at a time this way and you will be fine in a week.

    Hugs!
     
  25. Anyalee

    Anyalee Companion

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    Mar 29, 2007

    free time

    I tried free time at the beginning of the year and they abused it. The classroom next door complained about the noise during free time. The principal suggested I try something else- but didn't give me any tips. I think I will try the one in the door at a time thing. These are 8th graders. My 7th graders are SO much easier to control. I am in a Junior High (7-9) so that might have something to do with it. This is my first year and I keep giving detentions- but that doesn't seem to do any good.... I find myself showing a lot of educational movies so they will be quiet!
     
  26. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    I had a middle school teacher who would give us time to write notes at the end of the period. When I was in middle school, that was about ALL anyone wanted to do, so she used that as a "reward." It's quieter than free time. ;)
     
  27. Charab33

    Charab33 Rookie

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    Apr 1, 2007

    I am having the same problems. I am in my student teaching, and my two classes of ninth graders can/will not be quiet. I know it is the arrangement of the classroom, but I'm not really sure of how to fix this because the classroom is so small, and these are classes of about 30 students. The students are at tables, about 3-4 students per table. It is hard for me to expect them to be quiet in this type of situation, but I am unable to teach. They don't listen or pay attention even when they are quiet. I wish I could do something to get them motivated. Any suggestions????
     
  28. Anyalee

    Anyalee Companion

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    It's the weirdest thing. My classes were all pretty good on Friday. I hope they're not crazy tomorrow.
     
  29. smilingteacher

    smilingteacher Rookie

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    Do you have an activity they have to do at the begining of the period? I teach English; I have them do SSR. I have alot of activities they have to do independently and will not let them get off track.
     

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