Charter school and teacher credential

Discussion in 'General Education' started by montanadreaming, Jul 24, 2012.

  1. montanadreaming

    montanadreaming Rookie

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    Jul 24, 2012

    I was looking at applying to a charter school in southern CA. I was offered a position but something is making hold back on accepting. Here is why - when I started researching the school a little more, I discovered that about 1/4th of the teachers there had no credential.:confused:
    This is concerning me as I thought charter schools had to have credentialed teachers the same as other public schools. Can this school be shut down for this???? I would hate to leave my current position only to have the new school shut because leadership hired uncredentialed teachers.

    ANy insight or guidance would be helpful
     
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  3. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Jul 24, 2012

    In Texas, it is common for charter schools and private schools to hire teachers who are not certified. They are not required to do so. Here, that's seen as kind of their point. By that I mean that people are choosing to leave their public school systems because they are dissatisfied (rightly or wrongly) with how the "professionals" are doing it. The charter and private schools have the freedom to hire the person they feel knows the content best rather than someone who has gone through a teacher's education college prep program.

    Understand, I'm not agreeing or disagreeing with this position! I'm just stating the reason behind hiring non-certified teachers and why it's not only legal but expected in many of these schools.
     
  4. CFClassroom

    CFClassroom Connoisseur

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    Jul 24, 2012

    I would be concerned. Are you unhappy with your current position?
     
  5. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jul 24, 2012

    I don't think the teachers there are necessarily required to have a credential. This is true for private schools at least. Is there someone at the school you could speak with about that aspect? You would probably be an asset to them then by actually having your credential.
     
  6. montanadreaming

    montanadreaming Rookie

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    Jul 24, 2012

    Here is what I found on the CA credentialing state site "Certification for Teachers and Other School Personnel
    Since January 1, 1999, all teachers in charter schools are required to hold either a teaching credential or other document equivalent to that which a teacher in other public schools would be required to hold issued by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing. The statute also provides that it is the intent of the Legislature that charter schools be given flexibility with regard to noncore, noncollege preparatory courses. Teachers in core or college preparatory courses must hold a valid credential equivalent to that which would be required of a teacher in a non-charter public school. The statute does not affect the qualifications for any service personnel (administrators, counselors, librarians or others) employed by the charter school."
     
  7. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Jul 24, 2012

    In Michigan charter school teachers must be certified. If they can't find a certified teacher, then the school must go through some hoops to hire a non-certified teacher. Looking at what montana posted, it sounds like teachers at charter schools must also be certified, in California.
     
  8. TerriInCa

    TerriInCa Companion

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    Jul 24, 2012

    I will be working at a charter in CA. They are hiring people WITHOUT credentials providing they enroll in a credentialing program upon acceptance of the job. They must show proof or enrollment. But they are very excited to see people like me apply who already have credentials.
     
  9. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Groupie

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    Jul 24, 2012

    This would set off alarm bells for me. It could be that teachers are viewed as technicians to run canned programs, and not top professionals who are expected to use their judgement.



    Favorite Teacher Blog:
    http://ed-is-life.blogspot.com/
     
  10. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Jul 24, 2012

    Sometimes schools hire people, say, with a degree in math who don't quite have their credentials yet if its a hard to fill field. Othertimes, sometimes the data just looks skewed. For example, you might have someone teaching a mild-moderate Special Education class that's got a credential for moderate-severe, or a teacher certified in Chemistry teaching Biology. They might not have proper credentials so maybe they count it as uncredentialed. Check.
     
  11. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Jul 25, 2012

    I could understand if they were hiring interns who were enrolled in a teaching credentialing program or were just about to get their credential, but 1/4 of the staff seems too high for this.

    I don't think it's against the law, but I wouldn't say anything about a good environment to be working in. Being in a school where 1/4th of the teachers don't know what they're doing sounds like a stressful work environment.
     
  12. ddb23

    ddb23 Companion

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    Jul 26, 2012

    Depends on the district that is authorizing the charter. However, it's a pretty big red flag (in my opinion). When I made the jump from CA unified district I considered:

    - charter operators with multiple schools
    - charter operators with schools that had successfully undergone the charter renewal process
    - charter operators with schools who next renewal dates were staggered
    - charter operators that participate in STRS (pension)
    - credential status of the teachers
    - financial health of the organization

    I was moving to a district level position, so it may be different if you're looking in the classroom. It took me over a year to get my head around everything (and I'm still learning more).

    I quickly eliminated operators that made me think twice. Some of them seemed to be "playing school" as opposed to the well oiled big districts...

    Hope that helps
     

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