Changing a child?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by grothgirl, Jul 28, 2008.

  1. grothgirl

    grothgirl New Member

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    Jul 28, 2008

    The school board of our private school is looking at updating some of our preschool policies... What are your feelings about changing a child if they have an accident? Is it acceptable for a teacher to go with the child into the bathroom to help them clean up? Should a parent be called to come and help the child? What is inappropriate for a teacher to do within the school building and/or day? Looking for some help...
     
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  3. sarypotter

    sarypotter Comrade

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    Oh, goodness. Some days I feel like half my job is changing children. I don't think it's inappropriate for a teacher to do this; if we had to wait for some of our parents to show up, the kid would be wet for hours -- and we would be calling parents practically every day!
     
  4. TampaTeacher

    TampaTeacher Comrade

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    At my elementary school, teachers send the child to the nurse to be changed when there is an accident. However, the kids aren't preschoolers, so there aren't lots of potty mishaps.

    In college I worked at a preschool, and we were expected to help children change out of wet clothes. But then, our school went from infants to pre K, so diapers, potty training and accidents were part of the job.
     
  5. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    If a child in my class has an accident, I give them clothes and they clean up themselves. But these are older kids 7 +

    I just taught preschool this summer. I never had a kid have an accident during that time (amazing!) but the kids changed a lot for swimming. I helped as little as possible- almost not at all, unless a little girl got twisted up in the straps of her swimsuit or something. These kids were 4-5 years old. I think if someone had an accident they would still be able to help themselves. I worked in a toddler room before and the kids needed diaper changes.... so obviously it has to be done.

    Also, the bathroom doors of the classroom are usually open and I found kids would use the bathroom with the door open. They also changed in front of each other without batting an eye. They were very immodest. The room had about 15 minutes of nakkie butts as they changed their swim clothes each day. I think the policy would be a disaster. What if a kid had some BIG accident and it was going down the legs and stuff?? I wouldn't want the kid WALKING to the nurse with it dripping down the hall! You would have to take care of the problem where it happens!
     
  6. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    Here, public school is lumped into a different category than preschool/daycare, even if we are dealing with kids of the same age. And the rule in public schools is that the child must change him/herself, or the parent must be called (this for for kids who don't have a disability or medical condition that would make potty training or self-cleaning impossible). It has to do with insurance and liability, if I remember right. Kids with IEPs or 504s that reflect a disability or medical condition usually get the services of a health aide who gets special training and even special immunizations because they'll be dealing with bodily fluids. We have 2 health aides at my school that deal with about 6 kids.
     
  7. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    I think it's important to help a child become independent so they can change themselves. That said, if a child is unable to change themselves, what are you supposed to do? Let them sit in the bathroom all day and not change? Something's wrong there.

    Helping a child change is a learning experience for the child just like everything else is. Preschoolers are learning how to be independent and how to change their clothes.

    I don't think in any case we should do it for them, but we can help them to do it for themselves, because that's what's developmentally appropriate. :)
     
  8. teach_each1

    teach_each1 Comrade

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    I did school district pre-k for 2 years. We served children 3-5 and you did not have to be potty trained. We would assist-change-wipe with the bathroom door open so that the other adult could be seen as "in view" incase there were any questions.
     
  9. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Accidents happen. :) If they are able to change themselves, then they do, but if they need help then they get help. If it is someone that typically can do it by themselves but poop is in the mix, then the child gets help just to keep from getting poop everywhere, but they do dress themselves after cleaned up.
     
  10. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    As a mother, I can tell you there would be h*** to pay if I found out that my preschooler was forced to sit in peed/pooped clothing while I was called, disengaged myself from work and got to the school. Even working 5 minutes down the road, it can take 30 minutes from the time of the accident to get a parent there. That's insane and borderline abusive, not to mention embarrasing for the child.

    Preschool is a whole different ballgame than school age, and the abilities change dramatically from pre-school to kindergarden. I think its absulutes asinine that we would be so afraid of being sued that we will not take proper care of children.
     
  11. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Now I have seen school aged kids that had "accidents" on purpose, their parents were called after a while.
     
  12. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    That's something else entirely...and school age kids, barring any handicaps, should be able to clean up after themselves. Preschoolers are completely different.
     
  13. Zelda~*

    Zelda~* Devotee

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    At Head Start we kept the bathroom door open (co-teacher could see to cya) if they needed help changing. Otherwise, we let them change themselves with the door closed.
     
  14. Ghost

    Ghost Habitué

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    I work in special ed. and my policy has always been to have the child do as much of the cleaning themselves before I step in. If they are wet, no problem. If it's a BM, then I usually step in early because it's less messy. I have called parents for diarrhea and vomiting because of the health hazard to the others, but other than that I have called parents twice: once when we ran out of diapers and once when the child wet through his pants and I couldn't find any large enough to fit him. I feel as a teacher, I am the child's pro-tem mom and it's just part of the job.
     
  15. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    Unless the child is special ed, the children in our classrooms are supposed to do it all themselves. Mind you if they truly don't know what they are doing, I've helped them, but I guess I'm making myself liable when I do this. I always try to keep the door part of the way open and make sure another adult is in the room.
     
  16. MsWK

    MsWK Habitué

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    Well, I work with infants and toddlers, so I have to laugh at this, since I change a million diapers a day. When I was in public schools, we just left the bathroom door open & helped as needed, while encouraging the children to take care of themselves. That said, I've never had it happen on my watch with a child older than 5, so I'm not sure what I would do!
     
  17. futureteach21

    futureteach21 Habitué

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    At my daycare, we aren't allowed to help them. If a child pees their pants, they get clean clothes and are sent to the bathroom to change and clean themselves. It's ages 5-12 so usually they can manage.

    If its #2, parents are called immediately to come get them. We don't do anything else.
     
  18. alilisa

    alilisa Habitué

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    We try to encourage the child to change themselves. If they need help and it is a child of the opposite sex, I try to find another adult to be near by and in view of me, so there are NO questions.

    The only time I call parents is when it is dirrahea and to messy to clean up. If they are sent to the office and the health clerk is crabby-she will call the parents to come and change their kids so they can go back to class. It is just easier for us to do it ourselves in our classroom. That is why I have supplies (clothes, etc.) in my backroom.
     
  19. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    The thinking here is that if a child cannot manage a clothing change, they aren't ready to be in a public school setting. We have had multiple parents claim their kids are completely potty trained, only to have them come to school and have up to 5 accidents in the first couple of days, and we are only a half day program. I certainly wouldn't have a child sit in soiled clothing - I'd have him/her attempt to change and clean up. A wet accident is usually no problem, but a messy accident usually does require a parent to come and do the more detailed cleaning. And, in the case of children with multiple, repeated accidents...we want the parent to be disrupted at work, so that they take the potty training thing more seriously and we can all work together to get the child to the point of NOT having these accidents!

    And then on to the clothing issue - I teach 4 and 5 year olds. Barring a disability, almost 100% of them can manage to pull down elastic waist pants and underwear, remove them, and put new ones on. If the parents didn't insist on sending them in overalls or pants with belts, not only would be have considerably less by way of accidents, the child would also be able to change themselves with no issue at all. And I tell each parent to send a full change of clothing with their child every day. Many do not. So if a child has an accident, I'm the one expected to provide him/her clothing. I do go to Goodwill each August and buy more than a dozen pairs of pants and underwear, in various sizes, and when a child who has no extra clothing has an accident, they borrow my clothes. By November, I am all out of clothes. No one returns them. So, if I didn't call the parent, what would I have the child wear??

    Realistically, I have 20-22 students and one aide. If one of us is changing a child's clothing 2-3 times a day...there is only one adult then responsible for overseeing the oter 19-21 kids with no help. And if it happens during an instructional time, when I am teaching a lesson and so is my aide...then the whole class is losing learning time (and I'm losing control of them) if I were to go into the bathroom and help a child change. Pre-K isn't mandatory here, nor is it an entitlement. Not every child gets to come, and not every parent wants to send their child. We have, in the past, had to ask children to leave our program because they weren't fully trained. We hold their spots for 2 months, and they can return at that point if they are fully trained. (not my rule, it's our board of ed's.).

    Sorry, I guess you can tell I've had issues with this in the past!:eek:
    Kim
     

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