Change to in-home teacher, anyone have experience with this?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by logicrules, Aug 11, 2007.

  1. logicrules

    logicrules Rookie

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    Aug 11, 2007

    Hi, guys...strange thing happened. I received an offer to teach a NON-sped position and with school rapidly approaching, I took it. Unfortunately after the principal offered this to me, the supt. said she couldn't hire me; because I had yet to take and pass the approp. state exam (even though my degree and transcripts would have considered me "highly-qualified" without the passing of the test).

    So I accepted a different position; in-home trainer/ for parents of children with autism spectrum disorder. I have had little experience (directly) with this type of student so will have a lot to learn. Does anyone here teach in an in-home setting (training the parent, not homebound teaching) or have extensive knowledge of strategies to use for children with autism? I would be eternally grateful. I sure hope this is the last time I have to shift gears. So frustrating to be bounced around like this, but I'm excited about the opportunity to learn and work with these children. I'm considering it an adventure; challenging for sure but know I'll learn a lot.

    Advice, anyone?
     
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  3. tchecse

    tchecse Companion

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    Aug 11, 2007

    If the children are young, there is a great book-Teaching Young Children with Autism-that is easy to read and practical. It was written for reg. daycare providers to understand and implement within their day, so this should be easily modified for the parents to.

    I think the first thing to do is talk with the parent and ask what they want help with. Start with asking what the easiest times of the day are, and then the hardest. Ask the parents what their goals are. I used to work in early intervention (birth-three) and this was all done in the home environment. Parents will work hardest on what they want fixed, so keep that in mind.

    Also, think about simple ways the parents can work with their kids within their family's routine. For example, if the parents give the kids meal choices, have the family take pictures of preferred foods/drinks, put magnets on them, and have them on the fridge. Teach the parents to use this visual display with their kids to communicate.

    Hope this helps...
     
  4. logicrules

    logicrules Rookie

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    Aug 12, 2007

    tchecse: this is wonderful advice. I *think* I'll be working primarily with secondary students with autism (or, rather, the parents of secondary students with autism). I especially like the food images on magnets; what a great way to help them communicate.

    From my recent reading about adolescents with autism much of their struggle lies in the normal 'tween' issues that confront many students of non-autism spectrums. Such as puberty, social peer pressure, etc. I will know more about my caseload in the coming weeks as I start new teaching training tomorrow.

    Thanks again for your advice. I will definitely put this on my 'to-do-or-consider' list.
     

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