Chances of getting hired when pregnant?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Darkhorse, Nov 8, 2009.

  1. Darkhorse

    Darkhorse Companion

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    Nov 8, 2009

    Hi everyone! I haven't posted on here in a while, but I have a question and I was hoping for some advice.

    I won't go into specifics, but the atmosphere at my school has completely gone down the tube. The P and VP seem to be targeting people for no good reasons. Teachers and staff are getting in trouble for the stupidest things and everyone feels like all we are doing anymore is watching our backs and covering our behinds. I was told that there is only one person in the building who is happy this year and even the janitor is looking for a new job. It is incredibly disheartening because I used to love working at my school and now I dread going into work everyday.

    After a recent meeting with the VP where she said things to me that I really could file a grievance about, I have decided I will not be back next year. In fact the only reason I didn't walk out right then was because I feel I am there for the children and not the admin.

    With that in mind I just found out I am pregnant and due at the end of July. If I were staying at my current school this would not be a problem, but now I am very concerned about finding a job somewhere else. All the schools around here start at the beginning of August so I would be on maternity leave right at the beginning of school.

    What do you think my chances are of getting a job with me being on mat leave when school starts? There is quite a bit of competition around here so it is concerning, however without the maternity leave issue I feel confident I would be able to get another job fairly easily.

    I know the easiest thing would be to stick it out another year, but there is no way that I can do that with the current situation and I know for a fact that there are at least five other people who will be leaving with me.

    Any thoughts and ideas would be appreciated. Thanks!
     
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  3. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Nov 8, 2009

    We have hired pregnant teachers at least four times that I can recall.
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Nov 8, 2009

    I have no idea, but would it be possible to switch to a different school within the same district? Would that help things at all?
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Nov 8, 2009

    Could you not resign from your job until you get a new one? Were you planning on taking maternity leave into the new year?
     
  6. janlee

    janlee Devotee

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    Nov 8, 2009

    Where is your union if the teachers at your school are so unhappy? If you feel uncomfortable speaking with your principal stop the meeting and call in your rep to be with you. There is no one to go to bat for you if it is only you and the principal. Many people say unions aren't good. But in cases like this they stand behind you. I belong to one of the most influential teacher's union and they have been there for my colleagues and me many times, not just our local but the state as well.
     
  7. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Nov 8, 2009

    I think here it would depend on the grade level. They moved a teacher down a grade who was already working for us and would be on maternity leave because it was a testing grade.

    We interviewed a woman this summer who was going to have the baby induced about 3 days after the interview. They really considered hiring her but went another way because of lack of experience-the maternity leave part didn't bother them.
     
  8. Darkhorse

    Darkhorse Companion

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    Nov 8, 2009

    Thank your for your replies.

    janlee - My district does not have a teacher's union. We have an association, but it doesn't have much influence. It was actually the ex-president of the association (she stepped down last year) that told me I should file a grievance. So I really have no support unless I want to make more waves and go to HR. We were actually wondering how many teachers it would take to make complaints before something would be done, so we are looking into that possibility.

    Alice - I'm not sure if it would help to switch schools since it is the Superintendent that is ultimately responsible for the atmosphere in my building. He is putting extreme pressure on all the principles in the district causing them to come down on us. I know of another building in the district where teachers have actually walked out this school year due to the P and VP there attacking people as well. But I have wondered the same thing and I will definitely look into it.

    czacza - I am not sure I understand what you mean. I would prefer not to quit until I get a new job, but that may not be possible so we will see. I would be on maternity leave when the new school year begins for 2010/2011 so I will miss the first few weeks of school.

    Kinder and Ima, thank you for your insight. It helps make me feel a little more hopeful.

    Any other opinions would be very helpful.
     
  9. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Nov 8, 2009

    What I mean is sometimes a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush...If you need/want to keep working, it might be best to not resign from your current job until you have a job offer. The market is competitive at best, and with the current economy it's quite difficult to find a teaching job-even with experience. Missing the first few weeks of school could create some further difficulty in securing a new position- it's not about you being pregnant, it's about the students not meeting/knowing/getting in the groove with a new teacher for the first month of school. The first weeks are so important in establishing classroom community.
     
  10. Darkhorse

    Darkhorse Companion

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    Nov 8, 2009

    Czacza, I agree with you completely. I really need to have a job right now both for the money and the insurance. DH's job alone won't support us and his company's insurance is worthless. I really don't want to quit before finding something else, but at this point unless the P and VP change their attitudes, I can't stay in this environment. The stress is so bad that it has begun affecting me physically and I am worried about possible issues with the pregnancy now too.

    I also agree about being out at the beginning of the year. The timing of all this is less than ideal, but I am trying to find the best solution. We may be able to have my DH take time off so I could go back sooner, but again we would have to see.

    I am just so frustrated, because we have been trying for this baby for so long and I should be excited that it finally happened, but instead I am freaking out about what to do. Murphy's Law at it's best I suppose. That's why I appreciate any advice to help make this work out somehow. Thank you again!
     
  11. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Nov 8, 2009

    First, relax. I would suggest you go ahead and resign. After the baby is born, you will really want to stay home as long as possible with the baby. Families find a way to manage, no matter how little they earn.
     
  12. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Nov 8, 2009

    I think you should stay in this position while looking for another one. If you find another one, great! Accept it and let them know that they'll need a LTS to cover the first several weeks or whatever. If you don't find a position, stay where you are.

    If your family needs the income and/or insurance coverage, and it sounds like your family does need it, you need to continue to work. I think it would be irresponsible to leave a position that gives you a guaranteed income and insurance. It's not enough to say, "Oh, it'll all work out!" You have to make it work out, and very often that means that you have to work so that your family has enough money to pay the mortgage and buy food. If your spouse makes enough money and carries the insurance, then it's another matter and you might consider resigning. But you've said that he doesn't, so this isn't a viable option for you.

    To answer your original question, theoretically the chances of landing a job while pregnant are the same as getting a job when you aren't pregnant. Pregnancy isn't something that employers can consider when deciding to hire you. They're not allowed to ask about your pregnancy in an interview, even if you are obviously pregnant. In practice, I can see situations where a principal might not hire you due to your pregnancy. While that would be illegal, it would be hard to prove, since the principal could simply say that you didn't seem like you'd be a good fit or whatever. You might consider asking for phone interviews so that principals can't see that you're pregnant. You're not obligated to tell them until you are hired.
     

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