Chances of getting hired? (Rather desperate questions)

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by bluishblackbird, Jul 20, 2012.

  1. bluishblackbird

    bluishblackbird Rookie

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    Jul 20, 2012

    This is my last year of college. I'm an anthro major but am 100% sure that I want to teach high school social studies (however, I am also open to English). I should be graduating with a high GPA (3.7-3.8) with a bunch of history credits under my belt.

    I would really like to teach in CA so I want to pursue alternate certification there. I'm wondering ---

    1. How hard is it to get into CA's alternate certification programs?
    2. What are my chances of getting a job after I am certified? Is it actually possible that it is ... impossible? I have heard of some people not getting hired but I figure that if I apply to enough schools, it should happen eventually -- right? :/
    3. Will my chances improve if I apply to inner-city schools?
    4. Is there ANYTHING I can do during my last year of college to improve my chances of finding a job?
    5. Lastly - I'm conflicted on opening my search to other states, because my goal is to live in CA and I don't want to get certified in a different state if it won't transfer. Any thoughts?

    Sorry, that was a lot of questions but I don't know where else to ask them. Thanks everyone!!
     
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  3. 3littlemonkeys

    3littlemonkeys Comrade

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    Where in CA are you looking? I left southern CA in spring '11 because it was simply impossible to get a public school job, even though I'd been at a private school for a few years. This was elementary, but high schools weren't much better.
     
  4. bluishblackbird

    bluishblackbird Rookie

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    Jul 20, 2012

    Northern Cal for me!
     
  5. 3littlemonkeys

    3littlemonkeys Comrade

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    Also, regarding certification...I'm not sure what options you want to look into, but I know that LAUSD stopped taking interns altogether for awhile. Usually when schools are reluctant to hire, the first people they stop hiring are the ones without credentials, or with emergency credentials, etc. I remember when I was looking, most of the jobs were inland, in places a lot of people didn't really want to live--the more populated areas, inner cities included, were overrun with applicants. I don't mean to be discouraging, but considering so many people in my program were unable to get teaching jobs afterwards...I hate to see someone target an area where it's really hard to get in.
     
  6. mathteachertobe

    mathteachertobe Cohort

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    Jul 20, 2012

    I'm in the SF Bay area. Not many districts are hiring via alternative routes, as there are generally credentialed candidates available.

    Oakland Unified recently advertised for dual LA/SS, so I think getting both would help. I suggest checking out EdJoin to get an idea of the market. You can search by county and see what shows up, though not ALL districts use it, San Francisco Unified, for instance, doesn't.

    Generally, intern programs have been used for hard-to-staff subjects. I think a 5th year credential program might be a better option for you rather than hoping to land an intern spot. See if your school, or a nearby one, offers such a program. Cal State East Bay did, as of 2 years ago. Taking the CBEST and as many CSETs as you can manage will help, both for the internship route, as well as applying to credential programs, so that might be something to start planning for now.

    The job market is very tough, and part of why I recommend the credential program route is that your student teaching experience will help you both with practical experience, as well as job networking.

    Good luck.
     
  7. bluishblackbird

    bluishblackbird Rookie

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    Jul 20, 2012

    Hey thanks for the advice. Not what I wanted to hear but it's helpful that I know.

    Alright, thanks for the tip about a 5th year program! Not sure if I can swing it financially but I will definitely take a look.

    Does anyone have any input on:
    -Hard hard alt cert programs are to get into (e.g. The New Teacher Project)
    -Is there anything I can do during my last year of college to improve my chances of finding a job??
     
  8. 3littlemonkeys

    3littlemonkeys Comrade

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    I got my BA at CSULB :) I got my credential in a year and a half as well, through the Cal State system--but through their CalStateTEACH program. Since I was working at a private school, that counted towards student teaching somewhat, and I was observed each quarter by two different observers. I think if you work as a sub, though, while in a program like that, it'd be even better--you'd be seen and hopefully have an "in" at the school if they had openings. I never did get out of the private school--hence the move. And as for the tests, I had to pass the CBEST to enroll, but just had to complete the CSET and RICA while in the program.
     
  9. bluishblackbird

    bluishblackbird Rookie

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    Hmm, I'd really REALLY like to avoid going with a university-based certification program because of the expense :(

    HeartDrama (sorry the board won't let me quote you) --- So you're saying that other alternate certification programs are difficult because of the hiring part? (As in, it's hard to get the certification because you have to get hired first, and getting hired is difficult without the certification?) Or are they hard to get into in the first place?

    Thanks!!
     
  10. 3littlemonkeys

    3littlemonkeys Comrade

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    You need an intern credential to be able to be in a classroom, and to get that, an employer has to basically sponsor you...it's my experience that no school will need to "resort" so to speak to intern teachers when there are so many out-of-work experienced teachers in the area. And without being in a classroom...you can't do the program. Even here in Texas now, where the market is (slightly?) better, nobody wants to take alternative cert. teachers.
     
  11. bluishblackbird

    bluishblackbird Rookie

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    Oh okay ... darn it!!! Thanks for the advice. Looks like I will have to look into cert programmes then :/
     
  12. 3littlemonkeys

    3littlemonkeys Comrade

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    I really don't want to be discouraging, I just saw firsthand how hard it was, saw an intern teacher stressing over possibly losing her job (and therefore her ability to continue on the path to her credential) when her district started laying off (interns = first to go)...it's more expensive to go the traditional route, but safer, and will almost certainly lead to more job opportunities. It does all depend on your area, so definitely look at which districts in your target area seem to be hiring, but many might even say on their websites they're only taking applications from this or that type of candidate...I just think the more options you have the better, down the road.
     
  13. bluishblackbird

    bluishblackbird Rookie

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    Oh I totally understand that you don't mean to be discouraging or negative! It is just the reality of the situation I guess. Based on what you're saying, I'm thinking about graduating a semester early so I have some extra $$ to pay for the cert -- so that was very helpful advice, thanks :)
     
  14. 3littlemonkeys

    3littlemonkeys Comrade

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    Wow--I was going to tell you about the APLE program (they help pay off your student loans if you commit to teaching at certain inner-city or rural schools)...http://www.csac.ca.gov/doc.asp?id=111 ...but it appears they're not taking applications. Maybe something to keep checking on though? Or else I've been out of the state too long and they're doing away with the program.
     
  15. bluishblackbird

    bluishblackbird Rookie

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    Nooooo ..... that is like exactly what I would have wanted to do haha! I will keep checking there, gracias. I'm also open to AZ, CO, or WA if you know of any similar programs in those areas :)
     
  16. tonysam

    tonysam Comrade

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    Jul 21, 2012

    Don't consider the field, period. I am being brutally honest with you. There are few or no jobs, and the working conditions are terrible. Do you want to risk wasting thousands of dollars in money for a "career" that you can be kicked to the curb for no reason, regardless of obtaining "tenure," and never get hired in the field again? I think not.

    By the way, there are many of us who did the grunt work of traditional certification and can't get jobs. What makes you think you are so special that you don't have to go through that or a post-bach teacher/master's degree program?

    Social studies and English are the two toughest secondary jobs to crack, by the way. It has always been that way, and it will always be that way.

    Don't bother with K-12 teaching.
     
  17. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jul 21, 2012

    Bluishblackbird,

    Check out some of the other posts by Tonysam before taking any of his/her advice. You can find those other posts by clicking on his/her name.
     
  18. bluishblackbird

    bluishblackbird Rookie

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    Haha thanks for the heads up, I had gotten a little depressed there!

    I'd love to pay $400 a semester but I doubt I'll get much fin aid unless they consider me independent from my parents! :/ Sounds like a good deal though, wow.
     
  19. chasisaac

    chasisaac Comrade

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    To add in on here and try not to repeat to much.

    Read the job stuff here. Not lots of jobs and lots of people looking.

    P speaking, Why would I ever think of hiring you as an alt. cert. teacher when there are tons of others around. They will take less work on my part and you are a roll of the dice at best.

    Read the OP on http://forums.atozteacherstuff.com/showthread.php?t=161645

    My suggestion at this point is find a private school that will hire you. Get actual XP and earn your real (not alt) cert in the process.
     
  20. bluishblackbird

    bluishblackbird Rookie

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    Thanks for the advice. I definitely understand why a principal might be reluctant to hire me! I'll look into private schools when the time comes.

    And thanks for the link to the other thread, those tips were quite helpful :)

    Does anyone have any idea on where the best job markets for teachers would be? Would it help if I looked in very rural or very urban places? Are there any specific states that have a better outlook?
     
  21. teach42

    teach42 Comrade

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    You could try looking into urban teacher residency programs (just google it), which will help train you and give you a stipend while you are going to school. This is in exchange for commitment to teach for a certain number of years, usually 3 years, in that city. They are normally for high demand areas like STEM or special education but there are some looking for English. They are quite competitive but not impossible to get into. The other option is Teach for America, which I do not like for various reasons but that's another alternative.
     
  22. TeachTN

    TeachTN Comrade

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    Not until you are 24 (born before the Jan 1 of the year mentioned on the fafsa) or you can answer yes to any of the questions on the fafsa. When you are a graduate student, you are independent, but then you will only qualify for unsub loans from the federal government - not sure if CA offers anything to grad students.
     
  23. 3littlemonkeys

    3littlemonkeys Comrade

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    Jul 22, 2012

    My teaching credential program was not considered a grad program; it was considered a 5th year/undergrad program. I was able to get financial aid in the form of grants (I think a Pell grant as well as a university grant) that covered the entire cost of the program. Not sure what CA's financial aid budget is now, but in 2007-2008, I had the entire cost covered without any loans.

    I was also able to get myself declared independent while still in college at age 19 or 20, but that was due to other family circumstances that would likely not apply to most people :)
     
  24. bluishblackbird

    bluishblackbird Rookie

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    Thanks, I looked into the UTRPs and they look really good. No idea how competitive they are, but it's good to have some options to look at!

    Darn it, I'm 3 years too early! Alrighty, thanks for the advice though :)
     
  25. 3littlemonkeys

    3littlemonkeys Comrade

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    Well I guess that means my decision to leave L.A. was a good one. My experience at CSU schools was awesome...great education for under $1000 per semester. I guess no more huh? SAD.
     
  26. Xidous003

    Xidous003 Companion

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    Jul 23, 2012

    I will try to be real with you here...

    Secondary social science (general education) jobs are hard to land anywhere...especially in CA. There are teachers with multiple licenses/credentials, with many years of experience, who can't obtain jobs. Getting a job through an alternative route is bleak at best...especially in secondary social science or English.

    Here is my candid advice. Go the fifth year/credential route. Look for jobs all over the United States (not just CA). I have found that there are no teacher 'shortage' areas. Some markets are more saturated than others.

    Your best bet your first 1-4 years is working in a private or charter school. Less pay and benefits but you can build experience. Good luck!
     
  27. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

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    I'm in Illinois, not CA, but our states financial situation is just as bleak, if not more so. I was not able to find a social studies job (without coaching!) anywhere near an urban area (or suburban), and applied to over 100 schools. I was disappointed, but then began applying to rural schools, some 4-5 hours away from any Urban area. This worked, and I got a job within a month of applying to such schools.

    I've taught there ever since, and don't really mind it anymore. I enjoy the school and community. I had to move, but stayed in-state. Jobs are out there, they just might not be in your ideal location.
     
  28. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Out of State students pay more in other states then their citizens do. Most require you to live in a state for over a year before qualifying for in state tuition and you have to have moved there, not just stay in a dorm during school. Private Universities don't typically charge out of state rates but they are already way more expensive.

    Personally, I went to community college 1st and found a school that granted a full scholarship to anyone with a GPA over 3.8.

    You probably will find that if you want the 4 year school right away, the tuition will still be cheaper in CA than paying out of state tuition in other states.
     
  29. TeachTN

    TeachTN Comrade

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    Oh yes, when it is an undergrad program, that is great - so long as you don't have your Bachelor's degree yet - once you've earned it, you don't get Pell anymore, even if you are coming back for a 2nd BA/BS.

    As for independence, I've worked in financial aid for 4 summers and I've heard a lot of special circumstances stories, some are just downright awful - with proof to show what has occured.
     
  30. TeachTN

    TeachTN Comrade

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    Best bet is to talk to an admissions officer about this. Sometimes just the student moving won't make a difference if they are under 24 because they will look at the residence of the parents. Different schools will have different policies.

    My university charges about $11-12K per semester for an out of state student :dizzy:
     

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