Challenging my Higher Level Readers in Literacy Stations

Discussion in 'Third Grade' started by randi, Nov 15, 2009.

  1. randi

    randi New Member

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    Nov 15, 2009

    The highest reading level for a grade three class in our school is Level P. There are 2 students at this level. The rest of the class ranges from A-K.
    I am looking for ideas to challenge these 2 higher level students in literacy stations.
     
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  3. jday129

    jday129 Comrade

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    Nov 24, 2009

    Do you have I can lists as part of your stations? Add 1-2 activities at each station that are challenging. Require your highest students to do x number of challenge activities/week.
    If you list your stations, maybe we could help come up with some ideas.
     
  4. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Nov 24, 2009

    What do your literacy centers look like?

    Mine are pretty open ended - so my weak ones (level G) can handle them, but my strong ones ( N-P) can extend them. Everyone can work at their level.
     
  5. HeatherY

    HeatherY Habitué

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    Nov 24, 2009

    What do you do in your literacy centers? We have a pretty short reading period and I have been thinking about doing centers. Any suggestions for the basics?
     
  6. schoolteacher

    schoolteacher Habitué

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    Nov 25, 2009

    Here is what I do:

    1. Listening center with books on tape. Then a sheet to fill out in which students describe the beginning, middle and end of book, would you recommend it,etc.

    2. Letter tiles or wikki sticks for word study: they spell out their spelling words, or just make any words they can, writing down the list of words they made on a piece of paper.

    3. Games: a variety of educational games, including playing cards, and Boggle Jr.

    4. Puzzles

    5. Art center: draw a picture and write a caption of several sentences underneath it.

    6. Folder activities - various language arts skills in folders, this being mostly for the higher groups.
     
  7. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Dec 12, 2009

    One I've started recently that I love (and the students love) is a comic station. I used white out to get rid of the words in comic strips, and the students make up their own conversations by filling in the speech bubbles. They read the pictures of the entire comic strip before they can start writing so that the conversation matches the pictures. They absolutely love it!
     
  8. MissHunny

    MissHunny Comrade

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    Dec 12, 2009

    I love the comic strip idea!!!
    I follow the Daily 5. I do Listen to Reading, Read to Someone, Read to Self, Word Work (they have an I must list then I can bins), and Guided Reading. My kids love the Daily 5 and are so awesome at it. It is totally differentiated because they are working with their reading groups and using higher level texts. It also allows for students to have a say because they can select activities and their own books.
     

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