Challenging, intelligent four year old in Pre-K

Discussion in 'General Education' started by otterpop, Oct 8, 2013.

  1. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Oct 8, 2013

    Hi. I recently started teaching in an all day preschool/Pre-K classroom. It's a super challenging class. Nearly all boys with lots of energy and little ability to manage their own behavior or follow directions. We're working on routines and they have gotten a lot better.

    I am having a problem figuring out what to do with one boy. He is four years old, smart, and totally a handful. He just flat out tells me "no" when he doesn't want to do something. For example, when everyone is taking naps (a program requirement), he won't lie down. In fact, he enjoys doing exactly the opposite, and it becomes a kind of game for him. Worse, he makes noises the whole time, and I am afraid it will wake the other kids up if I don't address it. If I tell him he needs to sit at a table to calm down after he hits someone in the head with a block (we can't say "time out", but that's what it is), he says "no". I feel like my consequence options are limited. I can't put away all the toys for all of the kids because one student isn't using them right. But if I tell him he isn't allowed to use blocks anymore because he threw one, he ignores me. If we're lining up and all of the other students are (finally!) quiet in line, and he is running around the classroom climbing on shelving, I can't wait for him to "naturally" decide to come and join us because the whole rest of the class will start to misbehave. Does anyone have any ideas? I've talked to his parents and they are supportive, but there is only so much control they have over him when they're not in the classroom. I asked them about nap time today and they told me he doesn't have problems with bedtime at home, but that's because "he knows there will be consequences". This is just as much as a venting post as one asking for advice, so thanks for reading. Any tips are appreciated!

    (Oops. This should probably have been in the preschool section I just found.:sorry:newbie move. But this thread is as much about my frustration with a lack of usable consequences as it is with the student, so I would still love to hear any replies.:) )
     
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  3. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Oct 8, 2013

    This is a child who is testing you to see if you mean what you say. For nap time, you might try sitting beside him and putting him back on his mat each time he gets up. I once had to put up a screen to keep one child from seeing the other kids. He would get so bored that he would fall asleep. If it is not too rewarding for him, you might try holding him at nap time. You might have to send him into another room to nap.

    At line up time, you could hold his hand, keep him close to you.
    Keep reminding him, don't let him get away with anything. If you keep working on it, you will get him to cooperate. Good luck and keep checking in with us.
     
  4. 1cubsfan

    1cubsfan Companion

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    Oct 9, 2013

    Have you talked with his parents? Can you set up some sort of consequence system with them so they can follow up at home? Do you have anywhere else you can send him for his behavior? Resource teacher, principal, other teacher? Can you have a conference with his parents and the principal and set up a behavior plan for him to use while at school?
     
  5. Melanie Therese

    Melanie Therese Rookie

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    Oct 9, 2013

    If his parents are supportive and are comfortable doling out the consequences at home, perhaps you could start sending him home with a little mini-report on his behavior each day. Mock up a form with a list of things you'd like him to do and give each a 'yes' and 'no' check box. This way everyone involved will be able to see his improvement (or lack thereof) and you're not the only one who is following up with your student.

    I agree with the previous responses regarding his testing you and your needing to be persistent as well.

    Good luck! :)
     

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