Challenges Teaching Upper Class Students

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by isabunny, Oct 12, 2011.

  1. isabunny

    isabunny Comrade

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    Oct 12, 2011

    I was just wondering if there are any challenges that teachers face that come from teaching in high income areas/schools. I am writing a paper about how the community influences your classroom teaching, and because the area that I am writing about is mostly high income, I haven't been able to come up with much data. Of course there is lots of parent involvement, community sponsored school events, and lots of gifted and talented students. Are there any negatives? What would those challenges be? Thanks for any input! Much appreciated. ::confused:
     
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  3. Unbeknownst

    Unbeknownst Cohort

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    Oct 12, 2011

    Google "helicopter parents."

    You're welcome :)
     
  4. kme93

    kme93 Companion

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    Oct 12, 2011

    I teach in a private school where there are many wealthy children. You mentioned many positives, but I can give you some negatives :)

    - Some parents work too many hours and never see their kids or go to Europe for weeks and leave their teenagers at home "alone"
    - Major entitlement issues - "my daddy paid for this, I can do whatever I want."
    - Kids don't care because their parents will always bail them out and act like an ATM
    - MAJOR pressure on kids to do well so that they will get into Harvard, Princeton, Cambridge, etc.


    There are positives and negatives to teaching in each socioeconomic status, it just depends on what you want to deal with.
     
  5. Reality Check

    Reality Check Habitué

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    Oct 13, 2011

    A friend of mine teaches in a high-income school district. One of the things that constantly gets under his skin is the fact that the kids he thought he was building a rapport with all year long tune him right out and ignore him in the hallways after they got the recommendation for college they wanted out of him.

    He tells me that they also spend a lot of their energy "lying in the weeds" so to speak, analyzing every word and action of the teachers to see if they have an opportunity to run to the administration to complain about something.


    :mad:
     
  6. isabunny

    isabunny Comrade

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    Oct 14, 2011

    Thanks! I appreciate your comments.
     
  7. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    Oct 14, 2011

    Yup, so students end up in AP classes starting as a freshman and as a junior will often have 3 or 4 AP classed and many, many hours of homework per night. Which is in addition to whatever activities they're in, since good grades alone won't get them into a good college. There's a lot of stressed out students.

    Drugs are also a bigger issue in affluent schools since the students can afford to buy them.
     
  8. KatherineParr

    KatherineParr Comrade

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    Oct 14, 2011

    I think one element not yet mentioned is the affect on your classroom teaching.

    These students take advanced classes, they often use the summers for college programs (like Cornell's pre-college summer school), and they travel extensively with their families.

    Combine that with their work ethic, and what you have are students who will eat your lunch if you're not an expert in your subject. They absolutely disdain anyone they perceive as inadequate or incapable of challenging them.

    Of course, I love that about them, but your mileage may vary.
     

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