certified in one state, but want to teach in another

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by muxziem, Sep 28, 2015.

  1. muxziem

    muxziem Rookie

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    Sep 28, 2015

    Is it very unusual to get certified as a teacher through a program in one state, only to pursue a job in a different state? I am planning on getting certified in California, but I want to teach in Washington state. I know that each state has different requirements and tests and everything, even though I know there is also some reciprocity.
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Sep 28, 2015

    It's not unusual, but it can be a lot of extra work. Why are you going though the trouble of getting certified in CA if you're not planning to teach there?
     
  4. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Sep 28, 2015

    Washington will certainly accept CBEST results for the basic skills requirement, at any rate. You'd probably have to take Washington's subject-matter test in your credential area, though chances are good that you could obtain a temporary license and have a year or so to get through that.
     
  5. zoeconfetti

    zoeconfetti New Member

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    Sep 29, 2015

    There are any number of reason why this might be. Sometimes people are married to someone in the military and want to get certified even though they'll be stationed elsewhere eventually, for example. Or the nearest teacher certification program for them is actually in a state neighboring the one they live in.
    I know several teachers who got their certification/started their careers in one state and ended up in another. We're a very mobile society these days. The best thing to do is to check the website for the Department of Education in the state you're interested in working in. There will be information on out-of-state certification.
     
  6. ArtTeacher22

    ArtTeacher22 New Member

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    Sep 30, 2015

    It is definitely not unusual to become certified in another state. I obtained my certification in New Jersey and moved to New York shortly after. In my case, I needed to apply for reciprocity and follow New York's teacher certification process. It wasn't terrible. I had to take three exams, fill out a lot of forms, and pay a few fees. This was back in 2009. It seems that every year, there are more and more requirements for certification. Good luck!
     
  7. Helicase

    Helicase New Member

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    Oct 3, 2015

    Not really. I'm certified in 3 different states due to moving around. I attended a university in one state because they were nationally recognized in that subject. I decided I didn't particularly care for that state, so I got certified in a state that I liked and had a significant teacher shortage in my subject area. More recently, I moved back to my home state and was certified there.

    It hasn't been much of a hassle to me, its been more of a cost matter in some cases. Check out if the state you want to move to (Washington) has reciprocity with California for anything. Exam, class, and fingerprint reciprocity will all save money in the long run. Some states will accept certification from others without any additional exams or coursework, whereas others are very limited in their reciprocity to out-of-state applicants.

    I would encourage you check out their website and if anything seems murky, to contact a certification representative at the Washington State Department of Education and explain that you're going to be certified in the state of California (standard, provisional) and are moving to Washington and wish to become certified there. They'll let you know if full or limited reciprocity exists, if the website doesn't already spell it out.
     
  8. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Oct 6, 2015

    I got my certification in one state and a job in another. It was a pain. But doable.
     
  9. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Oct 6, 2015

    DEFINITELY research your new state's requirements before you leap. I failed to do that when I moved to Ohio and hadn't taken the PLT, which wasn't needed in my home state. If Washington's Department of Education website is tough to comprehend, pick up the phone.
     
  10. Boba

    Boba Companion

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    Oct 10, 2015

    Yes and no. I've lived and worked in CA, NV, and HI.NV and HI are DESPERATE for people in education and will be fairly flexible on the length of time it takes for you to actually get licensed. Others will not even look at you until you have the license AND are living in the area.
     

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