Catholic school pays WHAT?!?!?

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by sks72, Jun 13, 2012.

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  1. mcqxu

    mcqxu Comrade

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    Jun 14, 2012

    Last year I worked at a Catholic school Mon-Thurs that paid 15K, no benefits. It was really tough, but I did it so I could get my graduate practicum in on Fridays and still get some experience along the way. When they offered me a second year with the same exact contract, I turned it down.

    My current Catholic school's salary schedule starts at $34,000 with a BA, but the tuition is higher than most schools. This teacher pay is still around 10k less than area public schools, and the salary steps are much lower, but the school also pay for materials, professional development and graduate tuition.
     
  2. sks72

    sks72 Rookie

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    Jun 14, 2012

    Agreed...
    I don't have a rich husband! Can't afford that salary!
     
  3. sks72

    sks72 Rookie

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    Jun 14, 2012

    If that school offered me $34k along with those benefits, I would definitely consider it. They're willing to make trade-offs and yeah...it's awesome to have real experience on your resume!
     
  4. sks72

    sks72 Rookie

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    Jun 14, 2012

    I do consider fairness to be a part of it, regardless of circumstances. I just can't show myself respect (and food on the table) with that salary. So, I leave it.
     
  5. sks72

    sks72 Rookie

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    Jun 14, 2012

    Those contingencies are only true for government loans. If you have a private student loan, all bets are off.
     
  6. sks72

    sks72 Rookie

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    Jun 14, 2012

    Yeah, it comes down to the cold, hard facts. Even if it was "kinda" similar, I would consider it.
     
  7. CCinIL

    CCinIL Rookie

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    Jun 14, 2012

    It's not just the Catholic schools. I was recently offered the opportunity to interview for a private-non-denominational Christian school, but had to decline because of the salary (a good family friend is on staff at the school). The starting salary was $20,000 (in Chicago, VERY high cost of living. I have an MA, so would start at $56,000 in public school. It was nearly a 2 hour commute from my house, so I would have spent the whole salary on gas and tolls. My friend told me people working there fall into a few categories:
    1. New teachers with no experience looking for a smaller applicant pool so they can gain experience
    2. People with kids they want free tuition for (the salary difference covers the tuition they would have paid)
    3. People who for whatever reason have a problem with the public school system, and have a significant other who carries a good salary and good benefits.

    It's all a matter of choice. The pros are: much less paperwork, more freedom in lesson planning (although, this is debatable, especially in certain subjects), a smaller and often more supportive environment, smaller class size, etc.

    I don't think the schools are hoarding the money away, I think that is really just what they are able to offer when the budget's balanced. But the teachers who work there have to have a reason to do so. I would consider it just for the experience (not 2 hours away though...). If I end up subbing, I would still be making around 20,000 a year if things go particularly well.... and LOTS of those subs have advanced degrees and student loans. Unfortunately, no salary promises are made when you get a degree.
     
  8. Miss84

    Miss84 Comrade

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    Jun 14, 2012

    Yep! Most private schools do not have attractive salaries. I started my career teaching in a private school for about $600-750/every 2 weeks. No benefits, and there were stipulations to get paid on holidays. It wasn't an elite school, and I had the same student demographic/behavior problems you would find in a typical urban school (along w/ students with IEP's). I wasn't certified at the time so I took the job to have some teaching experience under my belt.
     
  9. ChemTeachBHS

    ChemTeachBHS Comrade

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    Jun 14, 2012

    Unfortunately it's very common but I think 18k is low. My husband works a 4/5 position at a Catholic school and gets paid per diem. No benefits or paid days off. It comes out to about $22,000 per year. He sometimes subs on the 5th day and works the after school program for extra money. He makes less than half what I do as a public school teacher but it's a teaching job. He teaches art and computers so public school jobs are almost impossible to come by so we don't complain.
     
  10. teacherwithlove

    teacherwithlove Comrade

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    Jun 14, 2012

    A nearby private Christian school starts their beginning teachers at 50k with really, really good health benefits. Of course there is only 1 opening per year and possibly 600 applicants to 1. It's the ultimate goal to teach there.
     
  11. TeachTN

    TeachTN Comrade

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    Jun 14, 2012

    Correct. When I work in financial aid each summer, I try to advise students to avoid private loans at all costs.
     
  12. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Jun 14, 2012

    I went to a Lutheran Private school in 8th grade, and I found that most of the teachers who were there either:

    a) had a child attending the school there, and wanted to be constantly monitoring said child.
    b) were well supported by a spouse
    c) received retirement pay and did the job as a supplement
    d) were simply wealthy and did the job for pleasure

    or some combination of any above said items.

    Very few teachers would become a career private school teacher (or teacher in general) for the money, I think.
     
  13. bizzbeth125

    bizzbeth125 Rookie

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    Jun 14, 2012

    I work at a private school and love it! I'm not religious, but the school is. It doesn't present any problems! Unlimited funding for materials, 2 teachers in the classroom at all times, prep periods, small class sizes, parent involvement,freed coffee, tea, snacks, sometimes lunches, no pink slips!!, no salary freezes, benefits! I could go on. There are down sides but it really isn't that bad considering the perks! I have. Ever taught at a public school so I'm probably biased haha
     
  14. Teacher Chele

    Teacher Chele Habitué

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    Jun 14, 2012

    I taught in Christian schools for years and would dearly love to go back, but who can afford it?
     
  15. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jun 14, 2012

    There are about 120 people in my school, and another 80 or so in my husband's, who are doing it without issues.

    We're not exactly wealthy, but we're managing 7 nights at the Beach Club in Disney World this summer.
     
  16. msmullenjr

    msmullenjr Devotee

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    Jun 14, 2012

    This topic comes up a lot, I think for sure it depends on the school. You can't lump a type of school into good or bad, anymore than you could say 6th grade teachers are mean. Some are, some aren't. Some privates pay well, some don't. Some public schools are amazing, some aren't.

    I couldn't live off of 18,000 but maybe that job is a good fit for someone else.
     
  17. Ross

    Ross Comrade

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    Jun 14, 2012

    One of my early jobs paid $11,000 and that was in a high cost of living area.

    However, this job gave me valuable experience which later translated to other job offers and ultimately much higher pay.

    If you have a job offer in a field that is of interest to you, consider the offer as a stepping stone to other opportunities.
     
  18. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    Jun 14, 2012

    I can think of 150 at my current school and we only lost 1 full time teacher and a part time teacher who is a missionary and was only back in the country for this school year. There are many public school openings so our teachers must be living ok.
     
  19. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    Jun 14, 2012

    In Oklahoma private schools don't have to hire certified teachers, so they don't try to compete with public schools. They pay 15-30% less than public...and Oklahoma is 49th in the country in teacher pay.
     
  20. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Jun 14, 2012

    I definitely think it depends. I worked at a Catholic school this past year and the pay was very low. They have a high rate of turnover (for many reasons but definitely including the pay).

    That being said, I would work for my alma mater, another Catholic school, in a heart beat. They are much more competitive in pay and offer advantages that the public schools don't!
     
  21. dizzykates

    dizzykates Habitué

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    Jun 14, 2012

    I hear you! I applied for a montessorri position and they offered me 17k a year and I almost laughed. I just told them no thank you and moved on. I was making more working for $11 / hour as a teaching aide and I didn't have ot write lessons. That didn't include benefits and the horus were longer. There was no way, it wasn't worth it to me. I ended up with a ft position teaching kindergarten for 29k and took it. I still had to live at home, but mangaged to eek out a car payment and later, rent. I only recently crossed into the 40k realm and that's after getting my masters and working for one distrit for 5 years. Good luck. It really depends on what you want to do and how you want to go about it.
     
  22. timsterino

    timsterino Comrade

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    Jun 14, 2012

    You guys are making 18K a year?
     
  23. timsterino

    timsterino Comrade

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    Jun 14, 2012

    What parent in their right mind would want to send their kids to a school with uncertified teachers?
     
  24. Geauxtee

    Geauxtee Comrade

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    Jun 14, 2012

    It really depends. I worked at a public school with a great salary and benefits. BUT... I didn't have a printer (umm, they could find any cords for them?), had 33 plus students in a class, at least 5 students per class were SPED or had behavior disorder, had 7th grade materials but rarely a student reading on level, the principal wouldn't suspend students because they were on some special program with the government and that would make them look bad, students bragged about trying to make me quit, only a thousand copies monthly and saw 160 plus students daily, worked an extra 20 hours weekly in order to differentiate the lesson plans to my students, took a sick day and principal complained.

    Quit a little over a month. Was not worth there grandiose money and benefits (considering I was shelling out at least 15 dollars weekly for copies!).

    And, it might be a regional thing since it all happened Louisiana too.

    Got a job at a Catholic school, and so much better and worth the pay cut. I have copies! I have a class size of 23! I am treated humanely! Discipline actually occurs!

    So, I am with ChemTeach and from this point forward will only teach in private schools and will only send my future children to private schools.
     
  25. charlottesome

    charlottesome Rookie

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    Jun 14, 2012

    I once interviewed at an behavioral alternative school that offered $28,000 to start. That is very low for my area (I'm certified in ELA). However, the best part was when they told me I'd be required to drive a van to pick up and drop off the students each day! :dunno:
     
  26. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Jun 14, 2012

    Same question! ;) That would be difficult, I imagine.
     
  27. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jun 15, 2012

    Me???? No, well more than 4 times that. But I do teach in a Catholic school.

    These are the words to which I was rssponding:
    I was answering her question: that I teach in a Catholic school and can afford to do so.

    And, for the record, private schools don't have to hire certified teachers-- that doesn't mean that they choose to do so. EVERY SINGLE teacher in my school is certified, the overwhelming majority of us with Masters, even though the state doesn't mandate that we be so. It's about the choice my administration, and many other administrators, make when it comes to hiring time. Like many employers, they choose not to accept the barest of qualifications mandated by the state. I think a lot of candidates are surprised to find out how difficult it is to get a job in my school. We receive hundreds of unsollicited resumes each year from some very well qualified candidates. But we seldom have many openings except when, like this year, our increasing numbers make hiring new teachers necessary.

    My point is that, like most generalizations, the image of the poor, unqualified Catholic school teacher who isn't good enough to get a job in a "real school" teaching "real students" is an easy, though frequently untrue, way of looking at the situation.
     
  28. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    Jun 15, 2012

    THANK YOU

    My school only hires cerfitified teachers. They will not even consider someone who is not certified. I am paid a salary very close to area public schools. Like Alice said, I make more than some but less than others. Our salary scale is based on the average of the 4 surrounding parishes (counties for non-Louisiana folks). We are paid 99% of the average. Two of the parishes are among the highest paid and two are medium paid so I probably make more than the public school teachers in the same parish as my school but a little less than the public school teachers in the parish that I live in. There is no major private school in the 4 parish area that hires uncertified teachers. There are some smaller church based schools that will hire uncertified and pay poverty wages but that is not the norm. I would have never considered sending my children to these schools just like I would not have sent them to public school. Private schools where I live are very competitive for both teachers and students. They have to attract students who can afford to pay the tuition. You cannot make generalizations about any school. Would I have sent my children to a public school? In Louisiana, NEVER. would we consider it elsewhere, I do not know because they would not have attended a substandard private school to say they were in private school but if there would have not been a private school in the area to fit our needs, then a boarding school would probably have been used instead of a local public school but that is a personal choice.
     
  29. timsterino

    timsterino Comrade

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    Jun 15, 2012

    I understand. However, based on what I have heard in the past and what the original poster stated they were offered, your school is not the norm. I would even venture to guess that your school is in a major metropolitan area.

    I also understand that most private schools have high standards. However, one person stated that a school did not have certified teachers. I can not imagine why a parent would decide to have their child in a classroom with an uncertified teacher. My best guess is that they have no idea that the teacher is uncertified.
     
  30. msmullenjr

    msmullenjr Devotee

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    Jun 15, 2012

    I agree that Alice's school is not the norm, but I also think that the few schools described here are not the norm either. Two examples on opposite sides of the spectrum, IMO
     
  31. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    Which three states? This term is used in many places. Around here it means Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri. Can you be a little more specific?

    I taught at Catholic schools for over a decade, but the salary I received even as a new teacher was at least 5K more than that. When I signed my most recent contract the salary was just over 32K. That is still about 10K below the public schools, and I know someone fresh out of college could be hired for what I was making with 12 years and 19 graduate hours. 18,500 is crazy though.
     
  32. tonysam

    tonysam Comrade

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    Jun 15, 2012

    Don't laugh at the parochial school salaries. This is where public education is headed, if people here would actually read the newspapers all around the United States. "Tenure" is under assault; teachers are being laid off, seniority rules are being undermined, veteran teachers are being harassed out of jobs or fired outright for petty reasons, TFAs are being put into jobs when they are not qualified to do any kind of teaching whatsoever so districts can save on pensions and health insurance benefits, online schools and charters are being allowed to flourish, and so forth. The public education system in the United States is being destroyed for ideological reasons; this is not paranoia but fact a simple Google search will indicate.

    I really feel this site is in a time warp. A lot of the advice here would have been good ten or fifteen years ago, but it's largely irrelevant today.

    I always tell would-be teachers to go into something else, for they will NEVER be able to make a career out of public education with the trends going on...this is NOT--repeat NOT--a case of the pendulum swinging one way in hopes it will go the opposite way or that things will turn around "when" the economy turns around. This is a permanent, fundamental shift, and it is terrifying because a public service, education, is being perverted by the elites and their political hacks in both parties to be used as a for-profit enterprise.

    Education is no longer seen as a public good. Run as far away from it as you can if you are not close to retirement age.

    Ten bucks an hour, no benefits. THAT is what a "teacher" likely will be making in the brave new world of education if the jobs aren't actually outsourced to China or India with distance "learning." Sure, some people are waking up, but they are up against very powerful interests.
     
  33. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    How exactly do we know what the norm is? What's the norm in public schools??

    Most of what I read here is hearsay.
     
  34. sks72

    sks72 Rookie

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    Jun 15, 2012

    True--the people I know who accept Catholic school jobs usually want free tuition for their kid. So, I can see that motivation.
     
  35. sks72

    sks72 Rookie

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    Well, public teaching payscales are public and published in school board meeting minutes.
     
  36. sks72

    sks72 Rookie

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    That was very intense, but I do agree with this coming down to a matter of class warfare.

    However, public school teachers DO still make more than poverty level salary. And I don't think any teacher (even teachers who aren't me) deserves poverty salary.
     
  37. sks72

    sks72 Rookie

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    I live 1 hr away from Philadelphia and 1 1/2 hrs away from NYC. Very populated area--$18,500 would mean I'd have to have two full-time jobs
     
  38. sks72

    sks72 Rookie

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    Thanks for relating to me from a practical standpoint! It's the truth.
     
  39. sks72

    sks72 Rookie

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    THANK YOU.
     
  40. sks72

    sks72 Rookie

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    Sounds pretty awesome!
     
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