Catching up long-term absent students

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by S Dubb, Sep 22, 2010.

  1. S Dubb

    S Dubb Comrade

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    Sep 22, 2010

    I've had a student out for over a week now and we've moved into new territory in all subjects. This child is very well-behaved, but she isn't really one where I could tell her what pages we've covered in her (X) book and then she'd be good to go with what's going on after reading them on her own.

    What do you tend to do in situations such as this? Assign the reading at home and tell the parents about it, hoping they will help the child at home? Exclude the child from the in-class assignments, but still give the homework? It might sound selfish, but I simply do not have time in the day to catch this girl up with all of the work that she has missed. I don't want her to be completely lost either!
     
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  3. alschoolteacher

    alschoolteacher Companion

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    Sep 22, 2010

    It depends on why she was out. If it was a family vacation, I would send all of the work home and give her a deadline to be ready for the tests that she missed. If it was an illness, then I would exempt her from non-essential work and try to find time every day to help her catch up on a subject. Hopefully, by Friday you could get her somewhat on track knowledge wise. I have two that will be out all of next week for family vacations. I took several hours planning, copying and organizing binders that they are to take with them and have completed when they return. They should also be ready to test when they return.
     
  4. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Sep 22, 2010

    Depends on the reason.

    If it was due to illness or something, then catch the student up on all essential work during free time and perhaps before school/after school if you can
     
  5. UVAgrl928

    UVAgrl928 Habitué

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    Sep 22, 2010

    Is there another class on the grade level that hasn't covered everything that you have? I had a student last year that missed an entire math unit, but the teacher next door was a week behind. So my student was able to go next door for part of math and get the lessons she missed.
     
  6. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sep 22, 2010

    If there's potential for REAL long term absence, she may be getting a tutor from the district.

    If it's mono/strep/surgery/something similar, I think you need to give her lots of time. The recoveries tend to take a while, and the kids try to get all caught up at once. Not only is it frustrating, but it's simply not realistic.

    Keep your eye on the big picture: not what you DID, but the material you covered. So, no, she doesn't have to do the grammar activity that the kids enjoyed, but she does need to know the grammar.

    But make it more of a long range plan. Thirty or so hours of school is a LOT to miss; she won't be able to make it up in a few days.
     
  7. S Dubb

    S Dubb Comrade

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    Sep 22, 2010

    Thank you for all the suggestions here.

    I think my colleagues are pretty much on the same lessons that I am so I don't know if placing her with another teacher would work in this case, but I do appreciate the suggestion.

    I always give my students two days for every one day missed when making up assignments (and I'm very flexible on this...especially with illnesses), so she should have plenty of time when she returns. From what I've gathered, she's been out due to an illness.
     

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