Career Switcher-And Wanting to Sub

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by mrsteach, Jul 30, 2014.

  1. mrsteach

    mrsteach Rookie

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    Jul 30, 2014

    Hello all! I am new to this forum. I am a career switcher. I have a Master's in Accounting. I am a CPA and CFE (Certified Fraud Examiner) I do teach a couple night classes at a local for-profit college. But I have gone back to the local university to get my teaching certificate. I will be getting certified to teach High School Business. When I was in college working part time at the bank, my major was actually elementary education, but I ended up changing majors to a business related degree. Now I am ready to get back to teaching, but I want to use my business degree and have decided I really prefer the older students to younger ones.

    My dream job would be with the district where I live. My son grew up in and graduated from this district. My daughter will be going through this district soon. (Yep, my children are very far apart in age.)

    I actually did sub in this district for one year, well over ten years ago. (I remember my very first day subbing was 9/11.)

    This all leads to a couple questions:
    1. Do I have a chance at getting hired? Being a little bit older and a little more expensive (based on salary schedules I have seen) than someone younger with a bachelor's degree, I don't know if that is a factor to many school districts. Essentially, will I get the "Your overqualified" argument?

    2. I am thinking of subbing again to become more familiar to the district. Should I sub in just this district or should I sub for other local districts in the area as well? Can one sub for more than one district?

    Thank you for any input!
     
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  3. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Jul 30, 2014

    I'm not sure why you would be so expensive. Around here, you only get credited years taught in a public K-12 school. And I'm not sure if a master's degree in accounting would count for MA on the scale. I know you said you want to teach business. It would probably depend on the actual district.

    Personally, it would depend on how they work. When I first subbed (2005), I worked for two districts and ended up withdrawing from one. They always called me when I was working at the other district. I had to turn down a lot of jobs and I really think it hurt me. When I subbed again for a month this past January, the districts switched to an outsourcing company (same district). I was able to sub for about 20 districts and they all used the same system (Aesop). So if I subbed at district A, district K would know that I was booked. It was wonderful. I was easily able to sub every single day. This was not the case back in 2005-2006.
     
  4. DressageLady

    DressageLady Comrade

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    Jul 30, 2014

    I was a career changer as well. I graduated with a degree in Elementary Education when I was 49, turned fifty that summer and was just hired for my first teaching position at fifty-one.

    It can be done. But I am going to be honest and tell you that it is harder, in my experience, to get hired as a teacher when you're older. I was very proud of my education prior to returning to school and I was certainly proud of my work experience (which was related). I had dates on my resume, thinking that my age would be a benefit.

    I ended up scrubbing every date off my resume. The only dates I included were related to my credential and endorsement. And I got hired. I know there were other factors: I was interviewing better this year and I had a whole year of para-professional experience to help shape my answers in the interviews.

    Just keep working at it. Don't stress your age in interviews. Learn to neutralize the age issue, while at the same time highlighting your experience. In the end, we are all first year teachers, regardless of our age. That is where I focused my attention.

    Good luck! I think we are fabulous additions to any school!
    Sheilah
     
  5. mrsteach

    mrsteach Rookie

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    Jul 30, 2014


    Here, the salary schedule is based on education level. There is also credit for prior years of service. But the salary of a brand new teacher with a bachelor's vs a brand new teacher with a master's will be lower to start with. My adviser at the university told me my Master's would count in that salary schedule. So that is where I got the "more expensive." And actually some districts have a schedule which includes a category of Master's plus 30 hours (which I will have when I am done) so I would be even "more expensive" to start with.
     
  6. mrsteach

    mrsteach Rookie

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    Thanks for the encouragement! I will remember these!
     
  7. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Jul 30, 2014

    Mrsteach,
    You may not be eligible for the Master's Pay. It would have to be in Business Education to count in most areas. They are very picky about it being directly in the field. I hope your adviser is right, because I know in the public schools I taught in, you wouldn't be given the Master's pay or the Masters +30 (you can't count your certification courses towards the plus 30.)

    I hope your adviser is right.

    I started teaching as a second career (before career switchers) and was pleasantly surprised at how positive principals were about being a bit older and more mature. It gave me an edge over the other applicants, and when it was my first year teaching, everyone just assumed I came from a different school and had no idea I was a first year teacher.

    Good luck! :)
     
  8. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Jul 30, 2014

    That is a better worded version of what I was trying to say :)


    Here, we typically have BA, BA +15, MA/BA+30, MA+15, and MA+30. Different districts give credit for different things for a variety of reasons. Last year, despite 6 years of teaching, I wasn't given any credit. New district this year. I was given 5 years of credit. I had to prove that it was in a public K-12 school. They made it clear that private or charter experience would not count. Basically, every district does things differently.
     
  9. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Jul 31, 2014

    What they do is also sometimes dependent on what you are bringing to the table and how much they need what you have to offer.
     
  10. mrsteach

    mrsteach Rookie

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    Thanks all for the heads up about the pay. So if that is the case, then maybe at least I won't have to worry about the "cost" factor going against me getting a position. :)

    Hopefully subbing will help out too!
     
  11. schoolteacher

    schoolteacher Habitué

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    Jul 31, 2014

    I believe that school districts would find you very appealing as a candidate since you have business experience and have your CPA and CFE. This is something that would definitely set you head and shoulders above other candidates and impress employers. Good luck!
     
  12. tired.mom

    tired.mom Companion

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    Aug 2, 2014

    I can speak for Texas--not other states--but a master's degree is a master's degree to most districts, so you'd get the pay. Interestingly, there are now studies out that state teachers are no better educators even with advanced degrees, so some Texas districts no longer pay additional for advanced education. I find that bizarre!

    Texas, in most cases, just looks at the degree--BA, MA or PhD/EdD--in determining salaries. There isn't so much focus on +15, +30 and such. And I have also seen first year teachers hired with master's, so it happens...and that first year teacher is still less expensive than a 10-year bachelor's-level teacher (the MA additional pay is usually like $1000 or less...:().

    I am also older--49--and try to "mask" my age/dates, but the truth comes out when applications ask for specific dates of degrees and such. Ageism? Possibly, but I don't know a way around it, and just have to keep trying. :/ With that said, my old district DOES hire mature teachers, so I don't think that's a concern. Just hang in there!!!
     
  13. UCLACareerChngr

    UCLACareerChngr Comrade

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    Aug 3, 2014

    With your background, and if you are interested in teaching business, I think your age and experience will actually be an asset. I was also a career changer and teach business at the high school level. My previous work experience gives me ways to interact with the students that other teachers might not be able to as easily. I know when I interviewed it was my previous business experience that helped get me the job.

    Also, as a business teacher, if you are interested in advising the FBLA (Future Business Leaders of America) club that will help too...good luck!
     
  14. mrsteach

    mrsteach Rookie

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    Aug 5, 2014

    Thanks for the additional replies! I am hoping my background and experience will only help me when it comes time for regular job hunting. In the meantime, I have gone ahead and applied to sub at the district I eventually hope to teach in as well as another one nearby. So I will see how it goes getting a sub position in either location.
     

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