Career Options Outside Of Teaching

Discussion in 'General Education' started by MyFinalYear, Oct 28, 2013.

  1. MyFinalYear

    MyFinalYear Rookie

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    Oct 28, 2013

    This might be it was just one of my worst days in 4 years of teaching; I do think about quitting a couple times a year, but I haven't researched very hard like this since my first year. And its been in the back of my mind the last few weeks, but I think after this year, I'm done with teaching.

    Overall, I'm burnt out, I've switched schools and while it is better than my previous in terms of students, there are still a lot more unmotivated and disrespectful kids than not only were at my High School, but a lot more so than my Masters Program ever hinted at. There is more parental involvement here, but not out of the worst students

    My admin has my back, but there is only so much they can do. We can't force them to stay after school for detention very easily, much has to be done to warrant an out of school suspension and expulsion is almost unheard of in the district. The best we can do is ISAP for a day or two and then they're back in class.

    I teach math, my undergrad is mathematics and my masters is teaching. I love teaching, I love working with the kids, but I got into this to help those who want help not to baby sit.

    Here is a list I've complied so far and wanted more suggestions on where to look at come next spring.

    There are a few educational centers around town I can work

    Insurance Companies, Banks, UPS, or other large local corporations: Training, HR or looking at some sort of data, not quite actuary level, but with math and being a teacher, I'm great at analyzing data

    Local University

    Private school - I went to a private high school and I do hear they pay close to our public district, pay isn't so big an issue, and I would consider working at my private school as I know there is a lot more parent involvement and of course they have after school detention and can kick kids out.

    Other suggestions?

    EDIT - I'm not interested in sales, I did that part time during college and left me stressed at times...even books, I wouldn't want to be trying to sell
     
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  3. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Oct 28, 2013

    I'm sorry that it's come to your planning an exit strategy. However, with your background, any insurance, banking, or finance back office would be lucky to have you doing their customer service and / or back office work. That was something I did for years before getting into teaching. It might be an option, depending on where you are.
     
  4. MyFinalYear

    MyFinalYear Rookie

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    Oct 29, 2013

    Today has been better, but the micromanaging of behavior is what is wearing me out. I just wish I could teach and one or two redirects a day instead of each period be it. The lack of motivation from a lot of kids kills me...I'm not a motivator in that sense, If it was up to me, I'd just boot them out to an alternative school or something, this is your job and if you're not into it, you should be fired
     
  5. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Oct 29, 2013

    Yes, if only we could have very well behaved students at least MOST of the time! But, it doesn't always work that way. Sorry you want to end your career after only 4 years. How about distance learning teaching from home?

    Good luck in finding something else!
     
  6. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Oct 29, 2013

    I left education for a career in college administration. I absolutely LOVE it, and wouldn't change a thing. I do not miss teaching at all-in fact, I still have plenty of interaction with students (and these are students who WANT to be here), and I can teach when I want to. But, I am treated like a professional (I know this is not the case for everyone here, but I was tired of being treated like nothing more than a disrespected worker bee), I have a professional level salary, and I feel like my voice is heard. I now sit on committees, boards, and task forces because I am valued for my knowledge and experience and what I CAN contribute-rather than chastised and belittled for what I DIDN'T do well enough.

    In short, I am happy that I experienced teaching for as long as I did, but I'm so much happier now.

    Look at community colleges, JuCo, private universities-often hiring in various positions.
     
  7. StallionMessiah

    StallionMessiah Rookie

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    Oct 29, 2013

    "We can't force them to stay after school for detention very easily, much has to be done to warrant an out of school suspension and expulsion is almost unheard of in the district."

    I just want to point out to you that these are all coercive methods, and they generally do not work, especially with students that have behavior problems.

    I am a new member, otherwise I would post a link to an article that I think you should read. The article is by Brendtro, L. and is called From Coercive to Strength-based Interventions: Responding to the Needs of Children in Pain.

    There are also a number of good books to read on the subject like "Teach Like Your Hair's on Fire" by Rafe Esquith. It is short and sweet.

    The bottom line is that regardless of whether you quit this year, you still have much of the year left. Work on building relationships of trust with your students.

    Anyway, that is my two cents. Hope it helps a little to get through the year.
     
  8. MyFinalYear

    MyFinalYear Rookie

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    Oct 30, 2013

    They worked at my school, I am of the opinion that you start hitting their personal time, and their family's wallets, like not getting full free and reduced lunch benefits if grades are not up to par or behavior isn't up to par. Or on third suspension = expulsion and must pay to send the kid back to school.

    That's my opinion at least
     
  9. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    Oct 30, 2013

    I'm so sorry you're dealing with this frustration and may I just say that I'm in your boat...but for different reasons. I'm not liking the path that education, in general, is heading.

    Regarding your comment "I'm not a motivator".. but in a way, we teachers ARE motivators. We sort of have to be. Maybe it's just a matter of trying different strategies until you find one that works with your class/group/student. And each class/group/student will require a different strategy. That is what I call "The Teacher's Toolbox"...you'll develop this with more years under your proverbial belt.

    Regardless of your future, I do hope you'll come back and let us know how you're faring. I wish you the best of luck!
     
  10. teacherguy111

    teacherguy111 Cohort

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    Oct 30, 2013

    I am enjoying this year and want to keep teaching for a little more. I think if I were to leave it would be for a job at a college or university. I loved the atmosphere of the college I went to (a very small christian private university) and think I would like to work there.
     
  11. The Fonz

    The Fonz Math teacher (for now...)

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    Oct 30, 2013

    Before quitting all together, try a private school.

    I worked private school, then left for a year to go to public for a considerable amount of more money. I hated it, but I would have stuck it outfor the money if we didn't move to Virginia. So now I'm back at a private school.
     
  12. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    Oct 30, 2013

    My Aunt got her teaching degree, but is an editor of a magazine.
     
  13. schoolteacher

    schoolteacher Habitué

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    Nov 1, 2013

    This is an excellent article. Thanks for pointing it out.

    Here is the link: http://nospank.net/brendtro.pdf
     
  14. MyFinalYear

    MyFinalYear Rookie

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    Nov 4, 2013

    I am thinking about looking into it. I'm finding out the two all male high schools play relatively close to what the public schools do.

    I know we have to be a motivator in some ways, but when a kid is failing most of his classes if not all, has a 40%, you move him around, contact home, talk with him about the importance of an education, trying games (but most kids aren't interested in fully participating) and they still just look at the work and don't care...I just don't know. I should be motivating to get kids to get A's B's instead of C's and D's to give it their all instead of trying to motivate them from F's to D's

    The system is what has caused a lot of these kids, they haven't been held accountable until now and they don't think they are held accountable. I kid in my grade was held back when we were in 4th grade because of grades, parent didn't need to approve it, it happened. No one wants a 16 year old 8th grade, so they get pushed to high school with math and reading levels on par of a 4th grader. I wasn't good at math until high school, but my 4th grade self knew how to add, subtract, multiply and divide better than a lot of kids I have now who are in high school.

    On top of the system passing them along, there is all this state testing, accountability scores, little wiggle room with curriculum and large class sizes combined with a society that just doesn't seem to value education as much as it once did, it is making for a poor system that is scary
     
  15. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    Nov 4, 2013

    But to me it's still a success if I can motivate my "F" student to reach a D+ or C-. Sure, it's not an "A", but it shows me (and more importantly him) that he is quite capable and maybe it's that small spark that ignites a larger fire.

    Just my :2cents:
     
  16. MyFinalYear

    MyFinalYear Rookie

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    Nov 4, 2013

    I understand, but that isn't my personality, these kids who need a major kick in the butt to get them jump started need someone who is all about that....the lowly motivated kids need more of a Type A personality and I'm more Type B...I know most of these kids CAN do it, that is what drives me nuts, one kid who is failing every class is very smart, he doesnt do work, doesnt turn in work and just sits and stares at his test....if he was in a class of 10 I could just hound him and make him work, but in a full class, I can't devote that time to one student
     
  17. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    Nov 4, 2013

    Ah, I understand.

    Best of luck to you.
     

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