Career Advancement

Discussion in 'General Education' started by whizkid, Apr 7, 2018.

  1. whizkid

    whizkid Cohort

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    Is anyone else looking to advance his or her career in the future, maybe to K-12 administration, college administration or perhaps professor?
     
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  3. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    I worked as an Education Coordinator, where I went out in the field training and monitoring Head Start sites. I can see myself doing that again, but don't like driving around town all the time. I'd rather have a desk job in one office, 8-4pm or even 30 hrs a week, and eventually --- No Kids! I just come in and observe, help teachers with questions, talk to a few parents, and then fill out papers, and go home. Maybe sub for a class during trainings or occasional absence. I would help others work with kids, but less wear and tear mentally and physically for me. That's my goal.
     
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  4. Always__Learning

    Always__Learning Comrade

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    I'm curious what type of job in education has those parameters - 8-4, no kids, observe teachers, answer questions, talk to parents and fill out papers?
     
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  5. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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    Sounds like a department supervisor position to me, though I dont think many of them stay until 4.....more like 3/3:30 most days.
     
  6. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    In Head Start, there are many administrative positions that don't work directly with children. There is a Family Support person who is responsible for going out to the field and doing some well-being/home visits checks. I don't care too much for those. Did my share as a teacher. They also work with the community to find resources for parents, such as potential employment, health clinics, and housing programs.

    Nurses are employed as Health Coordinators. They check the children's medical records, follow up on missing forms, set up referrals for counseling with obese children and children who have low weight and other health issues. They also set up free dental screenings with traveling dentists that come to the school, or have a van/bus that is a rolling dental clinic. The same applies with vision screenings.

    Mental Health Coordinators are usually people trained in social work or psychology. They work with severe and profound behaviors in the classroom, and help get the services for the children and parents before they transition to kindergarten.

    And, I already described my former (future) job - Education Coordinator. That person makes sure the academic policies and Head Start standards are followed. The also provide training and monitoring for the teachers.

    Some people work as consultants. They make sure the school is ready for NAEYC (National Association for the Education of Young Children) accreditation. That is a big deal. Parents look for this seal of approval. Additional, we need people to keep the director and administrators on their toes. Several inspectors come out and irritate :mad:(I mean check) us on a regular basis. The city, state and federal and funding site send representatives to check if our water is hot, and the playground is safe. All of this goes on while we are teaching, and the kids are running wild because they see we are distracted. They quiz us on CPR and First Aid standards, and ask where the nearest fire extinguisher is. Sigh...yeah, we are supposed to know this stuff, but I hate being tested while my class is in session.

    These workers have traditional office hours because most parents work or attend school, and you need to work late in order to meet with parents. You also need to work past 3 p.m. to go out in the field and meet community members. These companies and agencies are open all day, so you need to work around their schedule. Most preschool programs run between 6am and 6pm.
     
  7. FourSquare

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    We have central office positions here that are pretty cushy if you can keep them. They vary from teacher coaching, to professional development, to curriculum design, to progress monitoring program implementation. Unfortunately, they are also some of the first to get cut when budgets are bad. A classroom position is less desirable, but more stable in my district. I don't ever see myself working with just adults in one of these jobs. I think I'd go crazy.
     
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  8. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    Yeah, adults..it's hard going back dealing with them all day! I see these jobs as being in your own cubicle, running out to meet a few parents, 2 hour lunch - uh that is appointment with local librarian and then lunch. ;) And when you get tired of looking at your computer, drop in on class, play with kids - and come back to your desk!!
     
  9. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

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    Does your program run all day /6am-6pm?!

    How would you get a job as a consultant?
     
  10. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    Yes, we operate from 6-6. But technically my session is only from 9-3pm. I mainly serve as supervision and I can usually get away with doing paperwork after snack time.

    Most people who are consultants have worked as Master Pre-K teachers, or Education Coordinators. You would have to present yourself to potential schools to see if they have an interest. Consultants offer their services to child care sites who are eager to meet NAEYC accreditation requirements, or Federal reviews, or even sites that need to open an additional classroom, but don't have the time or a clue where to start.

    Some agencies will offer consultant jobs to you. I interviewed for a lead teacher job at the Y, and they told me another candidate was selected. A week later, they called me back and asked if I would be interested in working as a consultant on a short term basis, in order to help them with NAEYC preparations. I declined because it was rather far away, and I needed something stable with benefits.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2018
  11. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    I don’t know if I will because I am already maxed out on the teacher salary schedule (furthest column) and with my tutoring money (27k/year currently) at step 13 (100k) I will be making more than most principals, so I don’t see the benefit economically. I did entertain the idea for a while, but I weighed my opportunity cost and determined teaching is the better fit for me.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2018
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  12. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    Me too. :oops:

    In fact, I specifically went back to teaching because I had an initial teaching certificate. In order to move up to the standard certificate, I had to have 4 years of teaching. So I left my Ed. Coord. job to go back into teaching.

    I make more than everyone in my building. :confused:
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2018
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  13. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

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    The Head Start program here runs from 8:45-3:15 for full day and 8-11:30 & 12:30-4:00 for half days.
    I couldn't do 6-6!

    LTSing for the district here pays so much more. I'm going to have to figure something out to get out of public school but still make just as much
     
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  14. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Just LST then!
     
  15. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

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    Yeah that's the problem.
    I won't see any TRS funds unless I work here for at least five years, but we don't plan on living in this state for that long.
    And I won't see any SS because I'm in the public school. It's like a lose-lose.
    I'll have to apply for a refund
     
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  16. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Wow, you’re screwed regardless of what you do! :(
     
  17. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I have zero interest in moving into a university setting.

    I'm not at all interested in moving into administration in my district. If I did, I'd be aiming for a central office job in curriculum development or something like that. I don't want to be an administrator at a school site.

    For now, I'm happy where I'm at.
     
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  18. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    I work from 8:30-4:30. The center is open from 6-6!! :p

    You can skip a 1/2 year and take a break, pull your money out and go back to subbing. That would be my suggestion. I subbed for two years, long enough to use time towards earning my standard certificate.
     
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  19. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Very clever! Great thinking on your part.
     
  20. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

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    Oooooooo interesting! I'll discuss with H
     
  21. whizkid

    whizkid Cohort

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    Apr 9, 2018

    This
     
  22. Always__Learning

    Always__Learning Comrade

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    I don't think people should go into administration or academia because of the money. In most locations, administrators do not make much more than teachers when you consider hours worked and responsibility. Where I am going for a "District" job is not a permanent thing - for teachers or for administrators - the expectation is that they take the experience and bring it back to a school after a period of time.
     
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  23. whizkid

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    Imo, that's exactly why most do. We can sing the "we have a vision, we're here for children" game all day, but in the end, it's mostly about the money. I mean, we should just be upfront about it. That's a major reason for me because, well, I want to do better in life and I've worked for it. I can still affect student achievement given the right position, but I'd be disingenuous if I didn't just acknowledge that I'm looking out for my own financial well-being. Like my health, no one is going to look out for it but me.
     
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  24. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    It’s okay to go into a career for the sake of money. I love teaching mathematics but I also love making money. There’s nothing wrong with that. Many people go into careers all the time and base their decision on the amount of money they can make.
     
  25. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Exactly.
     
  26. whizkid

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    And given the cost of living (even in a small area), one would be naive to not consider income or potential income growth.
    Sorry, but I don't want to be one of these people who choose between medication or paying the rent. I don't want SS to be my sole or even main method of paying for living expenses. And I certainly want more than a pension. My own retirement + pension + SS makes me comfortable. I want the option to work after retirement and not have to just to live.
    As such, I would rather the pension of an administrator than that of a teacher in my living area. I have a degree in business management and a degree in school administration, so if I'm going to remain in education, then yes, I have to make the money. $70K and up is what I've worked for and I'm going to get there. Don't get me wrong, one can live and retire comfortably around here at $50K and even less than that, but I've put in the work to make more.
     
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  27. Always__Learning

    Always__Learning Comrade

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    If you are going into administration for the money, you would be better off financially to work summer school or teaching BEd courses at a university or a hundred other jobs that are available in education on a part-time, add on basis.

    My point is that if you take the number of hours administrators work and divide them by their salary, they do not make more than teachers in most locations.

    I also philosophically don't think people should go into administration for the money (just like I don't think people should go into teaching for the summers off).
     
  28. whizkid

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    Haha, well, I'd gladly give up the summers for the right payday. ;)
     
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  29. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    This is why school-site administration is so unappealing to me. I have no desire to work the kind of hours that site-based administrators work, especially the lower-level admins who are working their way up the ranks. Their base pay is not all that much more than mine, and in some cases it's less. Even with higher salaries, they are working much longer hours than I do, often well into the evenings and over breaks. No thank you, please. At this stage of my life, time is more valuable to me than money. Maybe when I'm older that will change.
     
  30. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    I worked in a childcare site on a college campus. What I liked about it was the innovating designs, great materials, and constant movement of student teachers. We all had a role in developing and supporting students.

    That’s something I might consider again. Campus-based child care. You are in a bubble all day. Everyone is watching you. Less chances for lazy co-workers and violent children to make your life miserable.

    There’s seems to be less scrunity... You have field based teachers and student teachers all the time. They are learning from you! Nobody is trying to correct you all the time. You have a school year with few disruptions, ( no i.e inservice days and report card/parent conference days.) Good pay & benefits, as well as flexible schedules. Because some sites are open evenings, I’d take the night shift, and have my days free!

    I think college & university staff are exempt from pensions. Only the faculty would fall under that drama of no social security benefits.
     
  31. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    I’m curious, how long have you been a teacher and how much do you make? Are you dissatisfied with what you make currently and do you see yourself becoming an administrator?
     
  32. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    While working on my Masters, I found many people go for the position of dept. chairperson in high school, and supervising teaching in elementary. Master Teacher is about as high as you can go in early childhood. This was the basis for many of cohorts returning to school. When you make these moves, you get more $, and usually achieving your MA/M.Ed. makes you a serious contender for the job.

    That's about it. No corner office, or bigger desk. Same hours and same location. You don't boss people around. You just get more work. You are expected to lead and get people on board with school-wide, district ideas - but that never happens.

    I believe many of us are content where we are, and some of us strive for higher pay and more flexibility in our work. What is important to note, is that there are other opportunities out there, and many do not require direct involvement with children. You are still impacting the lives of children, without the day-to-day issues of the classroom. Maybe health conditions may warrant a change of scenery as well.

    My brother has his doctorate degree. He is a research specialist, and focuses on improving education for all children. He travels to different schools and puts on workshops. As much as we have different opinions in business and family life, I value his work.

    Moving ahead or moving on is a personal choice. Money is not always a principal motivator.
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2018
  33. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    In my district DCs don't usually make more. Sometimes they get an additional prep period to take care of DC business, but that's not even a given.
     
  34. ChildWhisperer

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    Are they different from regular daycare centers? Since it's child care, arent they open year round and all day?
    How good is "good pay"?
    The nearest University to me doesn't have a child care site unfortunately
     
  35. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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  36. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    Salary varies on area, but also depends on education & experience. Not all sites open at night. Most run 7-6pm. You can work full or part time. They follow college schedule- no school means no child care. Junior and community colleges also have on site child care. Lots of one-sided mirrors for observing. Professors & college students in and out all day. Othen than that, basically same as any preschool program.
     
  37. ChildWhisperer

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    Any more than 7 hours I'd say it's all day!
    The community college here pays their child care center teachers a low hourly wage. Their director position was open not too long ago and advertised $11.25 / hour :eek:
     
  38. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

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    The pay and treatment of Early Childhood Educators in this country is beyond abysmal. There are some very expensive, fancy private preschools in my area, and of course wealthier families send their children there, deepening the divide children then bring to Kinder and beyond.

    A 25+ year veteran teacher just accepted a position in one of the highest-paying districts in the state, maybe the country. I don't fault this person one bit, but I do fault a system that doesn't encourage teachers to stay in the classroom or in their home districts because of the vast inequalities in our schools.
     
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  39. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Fault the school and school district that lost that veteran teacher for having a poopy salary schedule.
     
  40. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

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    Our salary schedule is on par with other districts in the area -- the other district is in an extremely wealthy area (tech $$). I take issue with the fact that one district is always going to be able to attract and retain the best, most-experienced teachers, while another is going to struggle to hire anybody, just because of the tax base in the area. So a student's education is essentially determined by their zipcode.
     
  41. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    That’s life. There will always be a separation of the classes and people will almost always follow where the money is because it makes fiscal sense to do so. To demonstrate, let’s say at district A the base starting salary is $50,000 and the teacher salary schedule maxes out $80,000. Now let’s say in district B, which is on the opposite side of the same town, teachers start out at $60,000 and the schedule maxes out at $100,000. Why would anyone, especially people who have advanced degrees, want to work at district A starting out or at all for that matter, assuming all else is equal?

    To most people, including myself, money = prosperity and a good life. The more, the better.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2018

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