card colors behavior management

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by teach4christ, Jul 27, 2009.

  1. teach4christ

    teach4christ Rookie

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    Jul 27, 2009

    Right now I'm trying to make a minimalist behavior management plan. In my school kids who really need a plan will end up having their own and typically the others don't need a formal plan at all. Mostly, I'm hoping for a way to inform parents quickly as to their child's daily behavior... I have an assistant who can add any specific notes as needed. Has anyone used this variation of the card colors (when students switch their colors based on misbehavior)?

    Students all start on green at the beginning of the day. Yellow cards would be moved as a warning, then red cards as a more extreme or persistent problem. The new idea I read about, was including a purple card to allowing it to be earned for an exceptionally good day. Have you tried it? Has the "bonus" card been effective and helpful? The description I read mentioned that many behavior problems may be corrected if another child gets to earn their bonus card, serving as a reminder to the child making poor choices (that may not work where I am, but it's worth a try). I like the positive management spin it adds this way. I'd love any thoughts or feedback on this or other ideas.
     
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  3. lucylucy

    lucylucy Rookie

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    Jul 27, 2009

    I definitely encourage creating a way for a child to move up and allowing for positive reinforcement. A good friend of mine is a second grade teacher and students begin their day on the middle color in her room. There is room for students to move both ways on the scale. I think that whatever you decide to do, allowing kids the chance to receive positive feedback with the management system is crucial. Good luck!!
     
  4. mom2ohc

    mom2ohc Habitué

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    Jul 28, 2009

    the bonus card sounds like a good idea, for exceptional behavior, but what about that kid who follows the rules quietly and sweetly, - do they get the bonus card? I am just trying to imagine using it - and it for me, seems like it might make soem kids feel bad that they were not exceptional. kwim?
     
  5. spunkyteacher

    spunkyteacher Rookie

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    I don't do cards but we move crayons down the board as they get in trouble. They all start out in the bright box, as they break a rule, they have to move their crayon down to the next box it goes from warning to missing all their recess. If they didn't have to move their crayon all day, they get a reward (a sticker, line up first for recess, etc.) They also get a smilie face on the behavior sheet to take home. If they have a smilie face for everyday of the week, they get choose out of the prize box. This is how I use positive reinforcement in my room. It works for the most part.
     
  6. teach4christ

    teach4christ Rookie

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    Jul 28, 2009

    Would you all agree that once a color change is made, there is no "going back"? Part of one description I read, said that if a child had a difficult morning and changed to yellow, but then improved during the afternoon could go back to green. I disagreed with that, as I think parents should know about the events of the day including poor choices, although a note could be added (as I often did) that the child improved throughout the remainder of the day.
     
  7. mom2ohc

    mom2ohc Habitué

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    Jul 28, 2009

    I never change back.
     
  8. wcvetwife

    wcvetwife Rookie

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    I don't change back either. Children need to learn that there are consequences for their actions - good or bad. I wouldn't change back, but I would give verbal praise to let them know I was proud of the good choices they were making. In the beginning I give small treats at the end of the day and then gradually move to treats at the end of the week. I would hate to know that a kid who came in acting horribly and then was well behaved after lunch got the same treat as a child who chose great all day. I would remind them that if him/her that if he/she continued the next day with great choices then he/she would receive the treat.
     
  9. teach4christ

    teach4christ Rookie

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    Jul 28, 2009

    I know Lakeshore sells a really nice pocket chart with cards provided... has anyone used it and found that it is more durable than one you could make? Does it last a couple of years to be worth the cost?
     
  10. backtoK

    backtoK Rookie

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    I agree with not going back. The parents need to know about the behavior. I bought a pre-made color, behavior chart. To make it last longer, I laminated the color cards. I put a label over the child's name to add a new name. I have used the same chart for at least the last 3 years. It doesn't look bad at all.
     
  11. MsX

    MsX Companion

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    Jul 28, 2009

    Personally, I'm not a fan of card systems or color systems. I've used them and they don't really work for me. I think the issue is that I have a hard time being consistent with them (because with some kids if I truly turned a card at every misbehavior, they'd be on the last color every single day). Also, I find that it doesn't differentiate between different misbehaviors. To me, hitting someone is very different than calling out a few times (both are problem behaviors, but one, I think, is more serious than the other). But with a card system, I found that students who called out too much were having the same consequence as a child who hurt another one. Also, I found that the students who are most "difficult" tend not to care if their card is turned, therefore making it somewhat ineffective IMO. I know there are people out there who love their color systems, and if it works for them, great. I'd just consider these things before implementing one.

    Also - if informing parents is your concern, I might suggest having a take-home behavior folder. I'm pretty sure I got this idea from here, but I don't remember whose idea it was! I give each child a laminated manila folder. On one side (laminated in) I have a behavior key... I list behavior expectations and then give each one a letter of the alphabet. So, "listens to directions" the first time might correspond with letter A, "shares with others" might correspond with letter B, and so on. On the other side of the folder I have a calendar. When a child has a difficult day, I put the letter of the corresponding behavior on that calendar day. That was parents can easily see which areas their child needs to improve. It's really helped my students to know that I communicate with their parents and parents like it because they know more specifically what their child was doing (when I had a color system my students would always forget what they did that got them in trouble!).

    Good luck finding a management system that works for you! I know it took me a couple of years to find something that I liked and I'm always tweaking it!
     
  12. wcvetwife

    wcvetwife Rookie

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    I don't even use color cards. I use push pins that they add to their name card on a bulletin board. No pins = A day; 1 pin = warning; 2 pins = satisfactory day; 3 pins = needs to improve day and 4 pins = unsatis. day. 2 or more pins removed and there is no play or free center time. I have a chart on my homework sheet to check behavior and I am able to give short note why. All I just say the child's name and tell them to push a pin. They put it on their by themselves and I quickly ask why expecting a short sentence as their response. It doesn't take away a lot of class time and works great for me. I have tried the light system and just didn't think it was effective for me. You just have to find what works for you.
     
  13. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Jul 29, 2009

    This sounds like a lot of work, but I like it. I agree with every point you made against the color system. I used it last year, and it wasn't very effective, difficult to keep consistent, etc. Plus, like you said, you both FORGET what they did wrong in the first place!

    Would you be willing to send me your behavior key? If so, just PM me. Thanks!
     
  14. MsX

    MsX Companion

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    Jul 29, 2009

    It's really not much work actually. I just try to make sure that I get out a child's folder when the time is appropriate (ie before I forget). Once the folders are made, you only have to change the calendar once per month and you only have to mark it when their is a problem - i tell parents that a blank calendar day was a good day!

    I pmed you - I'll send you my code if you'd like.
     

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