Cant get an interview

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by m1trLG2, Jun 10, 2011.

  1. m1trLG2

    m1trLG2 Companion

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    Jun 10, 2011

    Anyone have any ideas on how to even just get an interview? I have been applying like crazy but can't even seem to land an interview. I have had my resume and letter of application reviewed by lots of people including job seeking firms and our employment center on campus and they all say it looks great. However, I can't even land an interview. I have heard things like, "hand deliver the application and ask to introduce yourself to the principle." However, every single school out here says to not do that on their website. They just want you to send in your application using their online form. I'm feeling very disheartened here. I know I'm highly qualified, I have great experience and skills and I can't even land an interview. Here are a couple of things I had questions about if anyone can help.

    First, I have 2 undergraduate degrees (B.A. and a B.S.) and some graduate school (6 credits). I have this all listed on my resume and I am wondering how this factors into things. To me it seems like this would be an asset however, I'm starting to wonder if schools are worried that I will cost them too much? I have heard a couple of people say that this would put me at a higher pay scale. To be honest, I don't care about pay and I just want to teach. Should I take my other degree and classes off my resume and just leave my El. Ed one on?

    Second, are there any things I can add to make myself more marketable. I am planning to go back to school in the fall to finish my Reading endorsement but I really can't afford to do this without getting a job first. I do have listed on my resume that I plan to complete this by the end of this calendar year though.

    Third, I have a general question. I haven't had to address this yet on any of the applications that I have filled out but would be good to get some input on. I had a job at a youth shelter that I was "let go" from. The official reason stated was that I wasn't a good fit for the position. Unofficially, I put my foot in my mouth. I took the job because it had higher pay but essentially in terms of responsibility it was a step down from my previous job as a counselor. I was only there a month and did not know the politics of the office yet and a situation occurred in which a particular member of the staff did not follow protocol correctly. I came from an environment where this was drilled and enforced so I corrected her mistake without even thinking about it and went about my business. This is how we handled it where I was before, kind of a "I'll scratch your back if you scratch mine" environment. No biggie. Anyways, my boss saw that I had corrected a few of her logs and confronted me about it saying that I shouldn't do that. I apologized. It was common practice to come in and read the previous day's logs so that we were up to date with all of the kids in the shelter so I just told my boss that I had noticed that she hadn't been adding certain services for the last few weeks so I was just trying to help.

    Two things happened, a) I didn't realize that this staff was "teacher's pet" and that I had just crossed my boss's favorite employee. b) This place recently was found to be involved in a statewide social security scam and they were purposely not charging for some things and charging for others and I was screwing that up for them.

    Question is, how the heck do I answer the question if I was ever fired and why if it comes up? I don't want to come off as a complicated 'investment' but at the same time, I was not fired because I didn't fulfill my job expectations either. In hindsight I'm glad that I got out of there because they are now under investigation but I'm not sure how to answer this question if and when it arises?

    Any help with ANY of my questions would be most appreciated. I'm starting to get an ulcer about this job searching thing. I know if I could just land an interview I'd show really well. I just don't know how to get the interview. It seems like all the schools around here are only hiring internally or friends and family of teachers already there. I have heard this is political but aren't we trying to get the best teachers out there? Not saying I'm the best but I would like a shot at it at least! Please help!
     
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  3. Want2Educate

    Want2Educate Rookie

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    Jun 10, 2011

    First of all take a BIG breath!!

    I'm in the job search thing too and I know it can be so overwhelming. You've gone to school for so many years and thought that being a great teacher would be enough.... Fortunately for the students there are a ton of great teachers out there looking for jobs. Unfortunately for us great teachers there are a lot of great teachers looking for jobs. :D

    So, I know that I hand deliver a lot of my resumes and cover letters to principals but being in a district that says that's not an option I would suggest emailing the principal. I would also say don't email them your cover letter (when they read your amazing email they will go and pull your application which this is already attached to). Instead I would suggest writing an email detailing your interest in their school, why you're interested, and how your strengths and experience will contribute to that school. Don't forget to include you've applied with their district, that they are free to contact you with any questions they may have, and finally say that you are looking forward to meeting with them.

    I think that the more endorsements you have the more marketable you are. Don't worry about that hurting your chances. I had a friend that got a masters before her first year of teaching and had no problems finding a job. The main thing is you are passionate and make yourself a better candidate for the school then the others. If you're a better fit then they will see it as an investment to pay you a little more.

    As to your question about the situation at your previous job I wouldn't talk about it unless they ask you directly. If they do I would explain the situation without placing blame anywhere. Simply state you had done in this situation what you would have at a previous job and that it was a mistake. The main thing is you learned from it and accepted responsibility. Really focus on those two positive aspects so the interviewer will too.

    And finally, if you don't get a permanent position this year - DON'T GIVE UP!!! Seriously think about getting on their substitute teacher list next year so that you will have plenty of opportunities to introduce yourself and show them what an amazing teacher you are. Best of luck! Hope that helps.
     
  4. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    Jun 10, 2011

    In my district two bachelor degrees and few grad credits would not make you more expensive; most districts pay more once you hit a Master's degree.
     
  5. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Jun 12, 2011

    That's fine advice in better times, but honestly: it doesn't matter (unless by some miracle, the district in question is flush with funds.)

    I work in two districts: one very affluent and one middle-class. Both have been pink-slipping for years now. I routinely get complimented on my abilities--by parents, staff, administrators. But all that means jack squat.

    You can sub, and it's good experience in the short/medium term. But I don't think it's the door opener people wish it was... it certainly has not been for me.
     
  6. MATgrad

    MATgrad Groupie

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    Jun 13, 2011

    I have to agree with John on the subbing. It certainly wasn't the door-opener for me. In fact the district I subbed in while going to school NEVER interviewed me but they could sure call me the first day of school to sub and it was for a LTS while they found a permanent teacher.

    Now volunteering on the other hand I think makes you more visible. Admins tend to be at those and you get a better chance for them to see you then opposed to being in a classroom all day.
     
  7. abcxyz

    abcxyz New Member

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    Jan 28, 2012

    can't get an interview

    Being there.... doing that.... you're not alone. i have 21 years teaching experience and 3 degrees BSc BEd and Masters, 2 teaching certificates. teaching is just a tough job to get into these days. i can remember just dropping in a school and getting an instant full time job. your teachables are also a factor. mine is mathematics, science (physics) and computer science. Sorry no advice for you except that you have to realize you are not alone, if that's any consolation.

    these days, finding a full time teaching job is a full time job in itself.


     
  8. elateacher4life

    elateacher4life Cohort

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    Jan 28, 2012

    Don't take it personally. It is just a tough time for prospective educators right now. Stay hopeful and positive and eventually the right job will come along. I went from having no interviews in a year to having 10 interviews, so it can all turn around quickly.
     
  9. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Jan 28, 2012

    As far as getting an interview, I think that's just the market, not necessarily something you're doing wrong. I think others have already covered that. As for the job, you said you were only there for a month. Is there a way you can simply take that off your resume? Regardless of the reasoning behind being let go, is it worth it to list a job you only had for a month? How does listing this job make you a more attractive candidate? My best friend from home worked at a local clothing store and was accused of stealing and fired. I know there's no way in a million years she ever would have done it, and even though she found the receipt that said the "missing" money was a credit transaction and not a cash one, she was fired anyway. She was at the job for about 5 weeks. She didn't list it on her resume and it was never an issue. In her situation, which seems similar to yours in a way, she would have to say that she was accused of stealing, meaning that a)the interviewer might believe she actually did steal or b) if she tries to explain why she was actually innocent, the interviewer might think she's negative, a liar, or someone who can't own up to mistakes. Anyway you slice it, it was better for her to not mention the job at all- it's not like holding a job for 5 weeks would have made her look impressive anyway.
     
  10. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    Jan 28, 2012

    How long have you been applying? It took me 6 months to find a job here. I sent my resume to probably 20+ schools, got about 6 interviews and only 2 call backs.

    Is your resume only one page? Make sure it's concise. No one likes to read a story.
     
  11. tonysam

    tonysam Comrade

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    Jan 28, 2012

    I have never seen a teaching application outside of a couple of districts locally in Oregon where it asks you if you have ever been fired--period. What it MAY ask and will likely ask is if you were terminated or not-renewed, but these are for previous teaching positions. School districts couldn't care less about non-related jobs. And if it were a non-teaching job you were applying for that asked this question, you would put "no." It may be a "lie," but the question is there to screen you out. You never, EVER admit to being fired--it is the kiss of death for any job search. There is no real way for an employer even to find that out unless you volunteer it or you even put the job on an application, which I wouldn't even do in the first place.

    I don't understand why anybody even goes into this field when there is a monstrous number of people who are already unemployed. It is just insanity, and few of the newbies have a clue just how bad the work environment can be in schools. You do hit upon the nepotism problem, and it is one of the worst features of public education.

    It's a scandal that people go into debt for thousands of dollars just so they can work as a temp for years on end while somebody's spouse or kid can get a job right away.

    I hate to be harsh, but find a different field to go into.
     
  12. Auter12

    Auter12 Comrade

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    Jun 28, 2013

    I'm in the same boat. I can't even get an interview in my hometown, in which I've subbed (LT and other) for years. The thing is, I do have experience! I have 13 years in a classroom setting, only 3 of which, though, were my own class. My teaching career is one year at a time - budget cuts: let go; (same school) hired again, they hired someone, but there wasn't a position to hire him for, so they gave him mine (a lot of politics involved); hired in different state - closed the school. Idk how this looks on a resume, but one year at a time, at first glance to me, would look sketchy. I'm a go-to sub for any LT positions, but it seems as though I'm good enough to teach someone else's class, but not to hire for my own. I feel you in the fact that it is disheartening.

    Everybody says youneed to take a paraprofessional job to "get in the door," but I get paid more working as a sub (nearly full time) and can't afford to take the para job.

    Sorry I can't be of any help, but I just wanted to let you know you're not alone.
     
  13. teachinnola

    teachinnola Rookie

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    Jun 28, 2013

    I agree with this. A job on your resume for only a month is bound to raise a few eyebrows anyway, and it's definitely not a long enough time period that, if it were to vanish, anyone would question it. I would just take it off and not mention anything about it, or being fired.

    If you're not getting any bites on the applications you have submitted, maybe it's time to consider broadening your search area. Have you considered relocation?
     
  14. Mommyserenity

    Mommyserenity Devotee

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    Unfortunately, I have done both in my county (specifically at one school that I REALLY wanted to get into full time) and it has gotten me nowhere. I never get interviewed, even when the P knows I am really wanting to get into her school and she has openings, but yet they will call me every single day to sub both short and LTS slots. It's very frustrating. I'm good enough to sub, but nothing else it feels like. I also volunteered all the time since both my kids were in the school. I did everything from helping out in the classroom to helping coach an academic team as a parent. Still it got me nowhere. I was NOT amused!!!! :(
     
  15. mathteacher2

    mathteacher2 Rookie

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    Jul 1, 2013

    Definitely do NOT take off your second bachelor's degree. At my former school (and most that I've seen), there is no step for having two bachelor's degrees. It's usually Bachelors, BA + 30, MA, MA +30. So it doesn't make you more expensive, but it does make you look better. Also I know people who got a job right out of school with a Master's.

    If you think the youth shelter is something that is going to add to your resume, then keep it, but you don't really need to worry about the "fired" part, IMO. Just say it wasn't a good fit, simple as that. Personally, I have not been asked about ANY of my jobs on my resume that are not teaching related. Even back when I was applying without teaching experience. They wanted to know about my student teaching and education, but they didn't ask me about my 3 years as a camp counselor or my one summer as a server.
     
  16. kab164

    kab164 Companion

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    I didn't do a lot of subbing while looking for a teaching job. I saw a few really good, dependable subs never even get interviewed. I also had a few principals tell me they didn't hire good subs because they were too hard to replace! Instead I started working on an LD endorsement because I felt that would help me more than subbing. It took me four years to finally get a job! I do live in a small area where teachers tend to stay in their jobs until they retire.
     
  17. AdamnJakesMommy

    AdamnJakesMommy Habitué

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    :eek: I had two job offers before I finished my internship in December, and was called for interviews by two other schools that I didn't even apply for after I accepted my position, and called for an interview by another school which I had applied to. I'm glad I never saw a post like yours when I was thinking about going back for a grad certificate in education because I probably would've started investigating a new career. Why? Because as a new graduate I would face: A) being NEW teacher B) I have no family/friends/or nepotistic connections at any school C) I incurred student loan debt from undergrad PLUS what I incurred in grad to get my license---which all sounds like putting the nails in the coffin of being someone without a permanent position...

    Now that I'm looking to switch districts at the end of the school year (due to wanted to work closer to home) I am finding it MUCH MUCH harder to land interviews. I've only had two, and I've applied to at least 20 different positions. I am still waiting to hear back on both of them, but if they don't make an offer/break my heart soon, I'd just as soon take them off my radar--my current school/district might be a long drive but it is a great place to work at.

    So, in my experience, it was much easier to land interviews as a midyear hire than the end of the year. Not sure why this is though...I guess they have a TON more applicants, and probably randomly choose from a stack of qualified people?? Or perhaps, they already have their people in mind. Guess the middle of the year, they are less likely to have people in mind or have much, much fewer candidates to choose from.

    ??
     
  18. Teacher Gii

    Teacher Gii Companion

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    Jul 2, 2013

    I am in the same boat as well!! I have had ONE interview for this school year so far. I've done almost everything short of hand delivering my resume and credentials (which I actually plan on doing very soon). But I have sent numerous emails to try and jump start the process getting my name out there, and subbed, and work as a TA. It is a very frustrating process...I agree, especially when you see other teachers who are obviously less than par, and you go, "Really? They got a job and I didn't..there is something wrong with the system."
     
  19. Rainbowbird

    Rainbowbird Groupie

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    It's very hard, but keep trying.

    I wouldn't list that job. And, your degrees should only help you. Most districts don't pay extra til you get that M.S.

    TonySam is right in that this is really not a great time to become a teacher, for so many reasons. But since you are already in it to win it, and you've got your degree, you can't give up now. However, you may need to cast your net wider, get a second endorsement, consider relocating, etc.

    Don't think that it is you. Many have already posted about how they've been able to land jobs easily in the past, but now it is a different story. I've experienced the same thing. Got a contract in a very competitive district right out of college on my second interview in 1990. Got hired again in another competitive district on my first interview in 1995. After staying at home with my kids for 8 years, I was shocked to find out that even after listing all my volunteer and committee work, plus workshops I had taken while staying at home, I couldn't find a job. Well, I could have had one at a sketchy school that was losing teachers left and right, but I passed on that and did a LTS at my old district. They ended up having no jobs. So I took another LTS the next year, again, perhaps stupidity skipping over a probable offer from another school that seemed a little weird in the interviews to me. The 2nd LTS school has no jobs either, but on the other hand, I don't really want to go back there. They had some serious issues there.

    The good news is that the LTS jobs and the corresponding references I obtaining while doing them have opened the door to interviews for me. I have been called for every job I've applied for thus far this year (only 3 but still 100%).

    So subbing can help, even if it doesn't get you a job in that district.

    Since you are apparently young and single, I would def. take the opportunity to relocate if at all possible. That gives you a distinct advantage over older teachers like me, with kids in school and homes that we love, and spouses who cannot leave their jobs.

    Good luck!!!!!!
     
  20. teach42

    teach42 Comrade

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    Jul 3, 2013

    If you are not tied down to one place, I would expand my search to other areas of the country.
     
  21. RedStripey

    RedStripey Comrade

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    Although I agree that it is definitely hard to get a teaching job, it's tough to get a job in almost every industry right now. And I've even seen nepotism happen at retail jobs I've had in college (it happened in my favor once actually, I got a job only because my sister worked at the same place!). It doesn't only apply to education jobs. It's just how it is unfortunately. It's not fair at all, but we have to live with it.

    Like others said, consider getting a second endorsement, relocating, or anything else you may need to do. There's not one single secret for everyone to get a job. If there was, everyone would have jobs and it wouldn't be so hard :p. It's going to suck and you may have to do another job on the side for some time, but someone, somewhere will want to hire you for YOU and not because you're the superintendent's kid. Many of us are in the same boat as you and know what you're going through. It's hard but you have to stay positive. Best of luck to you :)

    Also..NETWORK!! I even told my hairdresser that I'm looking for a teaching job. You never know who someone knows.
     
  22. Mommyserenity

    Mommyserenity Devotee

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    Jul 3, 2013

    :yeahthat: I can honestly say I've had some job leds come up thanks to people who know I am actively looking.
     

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