Can you make a living being a substitute

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by BrownEyedGirly, Oct 24, 2007.

  1. BrownEyedGirly

    BrownEyedGirly Rookie

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    Oct 24, 2007

    I am in grad school getting my master's in childhood education. I have 2 years to go with my last semester doing student teaching. I worked in a catholic elementary school when I was in college which was about 3 years ago. To date it was the only job I actually loved. Right now I am stuck and that's how I feel, working in finance as an admin and I hate it. I sit there yawning all day, bored, staring off into space, as soon as I walk in the office on Mondays my whole mood changes. I recently did observation and spent a week in a school. Well it was like I was a different person. I was upbeat, felt good, loved being with the kids and other teachers, didn't yawn once lol and slept straight through the night before considering usually during the week I sleep horrible. It's probably psychological bc I know that I will be unhappy returning to work the next day. I'm not married and live on my own by choice, so I do need a decent salary as I have bills and other expenses. I make good money at my current job but my happiness means so much more. I have been considering to apply for subbing and quit this job completely. Thing is, I don't think subbing could be a set income for me. What else could I do to make extra money? Waitress, take an evening or weekend part time job? I just really, really, want to work in a school or with kids before I am ceritifed. I can't be an aide or work in a nursery school bc I can't live on 25-30k a year. But I also know there is no way I will make it working in corporate america another 2 years. Any suggestions?
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2007
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  3. Focussed

    Focussed New Member

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    Oct 26, 2007

    If you can't live on 25k-30k/yr then subbing is not for you. The only way to make more is to definitely get a second job at night, like a waitress.

    Also, if you do plan on subbing make sure that you register with as many school districts as you possibly can. If you do then you have a better chance at working everyday. If you're only registered in one school then there is a chance that they will only call you once a month.
     
  4. Honey1021

    Honey1021 Rookie

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    Oct 26, 2007

    In Iowa I think you can. Subs get ~$100 a day here and housing is cheap in my area. A lot of it just where you live. Tutoring and piano lessons are also a nice way to make extra cash since you can usually charge $15-$20 an hour for those. Two tutoring sessions a week used to pay for my gas.
     
  5. Learner4Life

    Learner4Life Cohort

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    Oct 26, 2007

    If you can't live on 25-30K are you sure TEACHING is for you? First year teachers here in MT only make 25K and while it is one of the loweset rates for teachers in the country it's still livable to a certain extent. Think of it this way... if you try living on a lower wage it will help you relate to those parents of your future students that are living off of less than you AND trying to raise a child! I have to tell myself that everyday with my 12K a year wage!!!!
     
  6. Honey1021

    Honey1021 Rookie

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    Oct 26, 2007

    I saw her location was New York though so I'm assuming the cost of living there is insane. If you're in NYC is it even possible to find a place to live that doesn't cost that much in rent/
     
  7. Mr. D.

    Mr. D. Rookie

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    Oct 27, 2007

    Tutoring is a great side job. In Cincinnati the rate is 40-50 bucks an hour. If you sub and tutor, you might be able to make ends meet.
     
  8. Turtle321

    Turtle321 Companion

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    Oct 29, 2007

    Sure, you can live on a sub teacher salary. Don't forget to enhance it with food stamps, charity, toys for tots, and food pantries. Oh, and don't forget to ask your neighbors for their outgrown clothes for your kids.

    Good luck!

    Oh, and all this will prepare you to be a full-time teacher, because most positions start at 25-30k a year.
     
  9. mstemple05

    mstemple05 Cohort

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    Oct 29, 2007

    Well, here beginning certified teachers w/ just a bachelor's starts @ $39,414? i think. And certified master's goes for $41 something. That's for the school district of philadelphia. Now obviously for the suburbs, they get paid more because it's all done by the neighborhood incomes/taxes etc. I find most teachers rather teach in the city though, because they like that 'challenge'. Now i'm not saying go to the 'hood' and try to do a DANGEROUS MINDS kind of scenario, but i think sometimes you may feel a little more rewarded and appreciated in the inner city, than in the suburbs where these kids are used to getting their way and having everything given to them on a silver platter.

    I also noticed immediately that you live in NY, so I know $25-30k THERE means absolutely SQUAT so perhaps you should supplement with tutoring. Another language? I know i could always do a foreign language tutoring session-ppl seem to always be looking for someone who speaks another language. Check craigslist.org, they always have 'side hustles' and things like that. Tutoring, after school positions, lessons, tutoring ADULTS for the praxis (i know i may need that myself soon). $25-30k here would be a bit difficult, but not impossible where i live, and i live a jump and skip away from a nice suburb. I'm in the 'rural' part of the city. lol. If that makes sense. So the cost of apts, bills etc are much higher out here than if i lived right there IN the city, in the not-so-good neighborhoods where we teach. So if i'd struggle, you probably would DIE. I would say stick it out for as long as humanly possible, keep your eyes peeled too.

    And not just that, look into charter schools. A lot of them still hire teachers who are not yet certified. Myself included. :). Of course i'm actively working on it, but i didn't think about teaching until a teaching job landed in my lap right after i graduated. And that was because i had a degree in the subject and they wanted that because they figured i'd be proficient enough to teach it, and worry about the logistics of the teaching aspect as i continued. Anyhoo... i'd look into charter schools first. And then private schools or even catholic schools. Private Schools you DEFINITELY don't have to be certified. They dance to the beat of their own drum. Of course they pay less too.... :/ and they tend to not pay over the summer. :/ But hey, it's happiness. Charter schools usually offer the same as the school district salary/benefit-wise. And I'm enrolled in the pennsylvania state education retirement system. Other stuff, but i can't remember right now. Some offer tuition reimbursement, others offer sign-on bonuses.

    I left a STABLE position, teaching the same subject i'm teaching now but to HSers. And by stable i mean the school's not in trouble as far as the AYP for the PSSA and all that. But MSers to me are such a lesser headache & struggle. They actually care about school and you can motivate them, they're little enough to 'baby' and call home if need be, but big enough to be independent to an extent.

    I wish you well on your search. P/M me if you want.
     
  10. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Oct 29, 2007

    Here in Texas the state base is $27000; however, my district and the surrounding districts range from $38000-$40000 for beginning teachers...some districts go as high as $46000 for beginning teachers; however, most here require you to be certified first.
     
  11. Budaka

    Budaka Cohort

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    Oct 29, 2007

    I one of the reasons why teachers say they don't make enough money. Out here (boonies) beginning salary is around 23, 000! After about 30 years service and a master's degree I could hope to be making 50,000!
     
  12. skiteach

    skiteach Rookie

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    Oct 30, 2007

    Good Luck

    I totally hear you! I am a certified teacher, formerly a broke, yet happy, aide (in MA) who left because I'm single and need to LIVE and pay the bills and rent on my own, etc. But, I have a job I am not passionate about.
    If you can make it as a sub and line up a couple of part time jobs, go for it. I would suggest sitting down and really thinking about your expenses. Because being broke isn't fun either. But, I'm considering taking the risk and going back to subbing to try to get a classroom job at some point myself.

    Good luck
     
  13. nasimi77

    nasimi77 Groupie

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    Nov 10, 2007

    [F]I was a sub with Los Angeles schools for 5 years. Intermittantly I did have some other jobs, but for a good 2 year span all I did was sub. I was able to "live" off of this because the pay was high. (about $171 daily). Still, it got old fast. I managed to get work from one local school so that helped instead of always relying on being called into a new school each day. My hat goes off to subs...it is hard work but I think invaluable if you want to teach. IMHO[/FONT]
     

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