Can students be put in Resource for behavior?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by Luv2TeachInTX, Dec 16, 2013.

  1. Luv2TeachInTX

    Luv2TeachInTX Comrade

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    Dec 16, 2013

    It is my understanding that students who are placed in resource are two or more years behind academically in reading, writing and math. Or perhaps they are AU or ED and need social skills instruction.

    Our administration seems to believe that resource is the dumping ground, so to speak, for students with behavior issues that the gened teachers don't want to deal with.

    Is this common practice?

    For example, we have two students, one was recommended to go to AB last year but the parent disagreed and has a para with him nearly all day long. Our other student, who has Autism, displays aggressive behaviors as well, is extremely disruptive and has eloped on numerous occasions. He is in the same class with the other student and has the same para support nearly all day.

    The only time they don't have support is from 2-3 and the gened teacher has complained about this all year. We were unable to provide a para during that time until recently, but the principal decided to put them in resource during that time instead. (Without an ARD first, mind you).

    I recently looked over the data of incidents during that time period and there has only been one incident from 2-3 for the entire school year.

    So there is no data indicating that resource is necessary and that they should be pulled from instruction for an hour a day.

    I am very upset about this and would appreciate any thoughts or suggestions.
     
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  3. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Dec 16, 2013


    Definitely common around my district. I don't necessarily agree that it's the right thing to do, but it can and does happen a lot in my neck of the woods.
     
  4. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Dec 16, 2013

    They probably have minutes so sped services written in their IEPs. Those minutes can be met in a variety of ways which could include resource pullout. Why don't you take a look at their IEPs to see if they are getting too many minutes by being sent to resource. If so, you could point out to your administrator that a legal contract is being violated.
     
  5. Luv2TeachInTX

    Luv2TeachInTX Comrade

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    That's a shame that it seems to be common. Our students are the most distractible and need the most help, so how is it beneficial for them in any way to be in a classroom with students that will inevitably take up all of your time managing their behaviors?

    These services are not in their IEPS yet. We are doing this is as a ten day "trial" and then have an ARD to add it in after the break.

    My issue is that there is no data to support the need for these services to be added. So why should I agree at the ARD? There has been one incident from 2:00-3:00 all year long. That definitely doesn't necessitate such a restrictive change of placement just because the gened teacher would rather not deal with them. That is not looking out for the best interest of the child; that is looking out for the best interest of the teacher.
     
  6. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Since a change in placement to more restrictive needs to be made with documentation and team agreement, I'd think that the change is tentative at best. What do the parents think of the change? Do you have a school psychologist who can chime in?
     
  7. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Can't argue with you there...

    After I just spent nearly three hours typing up paperwork for a referral meeting tomorrow, I'm beginning to think that regular ed teachers don't understand the meaning of "data". Data is not anecdotal notes, observations, and interpretations! If the teachers I work with are any indication, clearly very few seem to grasp this, and it sure does make the sped teacher's life more complicated than it needs to be.
     
  8. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Dec 17, 2013

    It depends on what you mean as "resource".

    Some local HSs have "resource" which is study hall built into the day and everyone has it. So, there is no dumping of students with behavior problems into specific resource class. It is grouped by a regular class roster.

    Some local HSs have resource that is a special class for kids on IEPs that need extra help. Some local HSs abuse this type of resource and instead dump, yes dump, students with behavior problems into this resource eliminating the possibility of the kids with IEP from getting any real help.
     
  9. pete2770

    pete2770 Comrade

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    Dec 19, 2013

    Verbal agreements over the phone comply. Not too many parents argue any changes at all...at least that's my experience in sped so far.
     
  10. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Dec 19, 2013

    Phone conversations would have to be followed up with changes to the IEP document. An IEP meeting can be conducted over the phone, but changes in services would be recorded on the document and sent home for signatures.

    IEPs are supposed to include the weekly minutes spent in special ed settings and are supposed to be followed with accuracy (within 30 minutes or so). Students with disabilities such as autism, are supposed to be exactly followed. This is to prevent students from being dumped in a sped setting (as the OP is describing) or conversely not getting enough minutes in sped.
     
  11. Nate

    Nate Companion

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    Dec 20, 2013

    If the parents are willing to sign off on it, it's really tough to fight. Yes, a placement is a team decision, but in reality, the parent is the only person who can put up enough of a fuss to make a difference.
     
  12. ecteach

    ecteach Devotee

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    Dec 22, 2013

    This is a tough one. As a self-contained special needs teacher I have had this happen way too much. The only thing saving me from getting ALL of the behavior kids is my licensure. For middle school, I can only teach the adapted curriculum. I have had a few students who are borderline, and really should not be with me ethically. But, it's okay with everyone involved because those kids are now out of sight and out of mind. I recently got into a full blown argument with a general ed teacher about a student WHO DID NOT BELONG WITH ME ON ANY LEVEL. She stated, "All he does is disrupt the classroom." I stated, "And that's the SAME thing he will do with me." She said, "Well, you have smaller numbers." It went on, and on, and on. I wonder why it's okay for my sweet babies to be exposed to this child, but not the "regular ed" students. This child is still pending. I am 80% sure he will end up with me. But, hey, I tried. We are fighting a losing battle at times.
     
  13. kevo2005

    kevo2005 Companion

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    Dec 24, 2013

    Is there not a behavioral support class?

    We have Behavioral Intervention Class (BIC) in which the students have to earn their way out. Then they have allotted time each six weeks in case they need it.
     

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