can one room school houses still work ?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Mr.Milton, Jan 31, 2013.

  1. Mr.Milton

    Mr.Milton Rookie

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    I am planning on opening my own private school one day in the very far future, and then I thought maybe i could start it as just a one room school house and then let it grow from there. Maybe only have grades k-5 at first and expand as the students do. Just wanting some opinions. :rolleyes:
     
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  3. knitter63

    knitter63 Groupie

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    I think it would be very challenging with today's common core standards. That is an awful lot of planning to do!
     
  4. Ranchwife

    Ranchwife Companion

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    We have a one room school in our district - it is the top school in the entire district. The teacher is amazing and teaches grade k-5. She is excited about including the common core because the standards are the same for grades k-8 but build in complexity. She said it will actually be easier for her. She has taught there for abut 25 years and is truely a master teacher. It can be done, but the teacher has to be amazing.
     
  5. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Yikes! I can't even begin to fathom a one room school. It's difficult enough teaching one single grade-level and trying to differentiate for everyone.
     
  6. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    I would do some heavy research into Open Classroom models (I stumbled upon this earlier today while searching for something else). It is feasible and can be very successful, but it has to be approached correctly.
     
  7. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    We have a one-room schoolhouse in my district. I think it's grades K-5. The students seem to do well there. I'm sure it's a lot of work for the teacher, though.
     
  8. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Is that like where you have lots of classes (each with its own teacher) in one large space? Or is there a single teacher, like in the traditional one-room schoolhouse model?
     
  9. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    I would think it depends on which model is used. I've seen Open Classroom applied to the point that the school had NO walls and students built their individual curriculum based on inquiry. I've also seen schools where students have their own cubicles (all in one room) and work on projects as if they were in the workplace.
     
  10. Rox

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    I'm a special ed teacher, and I teach 3rd-5th grade. It's quite a challenge to teach all the different levels. I have to find things that I'm okay with my paraeducator teaching, so that she can teach one group while I teach the other group. Or find independent work for the kids to work on while I rotated groups.
     
  11. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    I think it's very doable, but will requite a TON of research. I mean, a TON. You have to not only look at how you want to run the school, but also the laws, business apsect, money, resources, etc. My friend and I were looking into just starting a computer tech summer camp. My mind was swirling with just the BASIC stuff that we had to look into and figure out, such as insurance and licensing. Anyways, I decided this isn't something I'm ready for at the moment.

    But if this is something you really want to do and are passionate about, then go for it. Just be realistic about the amount of work you will have to do.
     
  12. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    All the SDC teachers within my district either teach Kinder-First or 2nd-5th.

    Personally, I don't know how they do it.

    A close friend of mine teachers the 2nd-5th group, and although she has a full-time aide, she's always stressed out!
     
  13. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    JaimeMarie taught in a one room school....varied grades...but it was a district school, I believe, not one started independently.
     
  14. GemStone

    GemStone Habitué

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    Half the world attends one-room schoolhouses, usually without electricity or books.

    I don't know how well it would work here, though
     
  15. Mr.Milton

    Mr.Milton Rookie

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    thanks for all the feedback

    I'm from a very poor county in the Appalachian mounties and was hoping to start a private one room school house to help give back to the community. do you think it would be possible to run on just donations and be tuition free ? when i gradate I will be qualified to teach pk-8 do you think one teacher could handle k-8 ? :) :thanks:
     
  16. GemStone

    GemStone Habitué

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    Will your school be as good as or better than the public ones? I got a great education in a poor Appalachian mountain town's public schools.
     
  17. Mr.Milton

    Mr.Milton Rookie

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    I too have got a good education from my towns public school system, to an extant any ways. It was all good till they started closing down the schools small class rooms with one on one attention work best. It will have a maximum class on 20 students after that level is passed i might open another school. So in my opinion it will be better.
     
  18. First School

    First School Rookie

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    Are you planning for establishing school in rural area, then you can think of it. Otherwise, in this tough competition and standard it would be very difficult to run the school successfully. I would there for suggest you to take a second thought.
     
  19. FuntoLearn

    FuntoLearn Rookie

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    I've always wondered how one-room school houses worked.

    I've always been curious how one room school houses worked, and would love to see one in action, myself! I remember reading about some of the details of how they worked (at the turn-of-the century, at least) in an older children's book. The students were grouped with others based on their proficiency in a subject, not according to their age or grade. They didn't really have grade level "labels". Students could move up quickly if they worked hard. They might be in different levels for different subjects. The students would be doing seat work and the teacher would call up the different groups one at a time. I guess it is sort of similar to having group rotations for reading or math, but with a wider variety of ages! I always thought that sounded like common sense. Your typical public school parents probably wouldn't go for not having a grade level designation today. However, those willing to send a student to a non-traditional public school in the first place aren't looking for the typical public school educational experience, anyway, so they might! How were you planning on handling the different ages all together at once?

    Have you ever thought about marketing this one-room school idea to homeschoolers? I know that many homeschoolers don't really care about grade level designations and public school "norms." Many homeschool curriculums are actually designed to teach to different ages at once (esp. content oriented subjects like science and history) because many homeschool families teach all the kids together--so they are used to the idea of a mulit-age level "classroom".

    I used to be a home educator and I taught at a 2 -day- a-week "tutorial service" that was really a 2 x a week school with lots of "homework"! You might find home educators wiling to pay you for a two- or three-day a week "school". You could alternate and do younger ones on Tues. and Thurs. and older ones the other 3 days. (You might not be able to teach a homeschooler 5 days a week and have it still be considered "homeschooling" in your state- I'm not sure.But if it was considered "homeschooling", that may avoid lots of bureacratic regulations.) If it was only part time for each student, it would be more affordable for the families. You would just need more total families to add up to full-time pay for you! Just a thought, fwiw.

    There are also many people looking to pay someone to "homeschool" their kids "full-time" (which I'm not sure if that is technically legal to be called "homeschool" in some states). I used to see those requests come through our homeschool email lists all the time. So perhaps that sort of person would be open to your one-room school house idea. I would have loved to send my kids to one it if it was inexpensive enough, well-run, and I thought the education and teaching was great!

    There are many of these hybrid schools (part homeschool, part school) springing up all over the country, btw. Many, if not most, of them follow a classical, Christian education philosophy, however. I don't know if you are familiar with classical education, but it is a growing movement among private and homeschools (and even public charter schools) with a very strong appeal to many parents. The education in this country during the hey-day of the one-room-school house WAS really classical education. (My 94 year old mother-in-law even HAD to learn Latin in her public, small town high school!) I really believe in the general principles of the classical education "trivium", but I disagree on one point---I think learning Latin in this day and age should be optional, not required!

    Bottom line--as a former homeschooler, I know that there are lots of parents out there who are not satisfied with a typical public school education or environment and I'll bet that you could find many willing to consider sending their kids to a one-room school house--especially if the price is affordable and they like the educational philosophy.

    Best wishes in your endeavor.
     
  20. Mr.Milton

    Mr.Milton Rookie

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    Feb 3, 2013

    I too have done alot of research into this. when i first started about a year ago i was shocked to find out that some one room school houses still existed in the U.S. today. can you remember the name of that book ? I am debating very strongly about how much technology to put into the room but if i decide to go with the one laptop per a child idea i have been thinking of it would make multitasking between levels of understanding much easier, for example while kids x,y, and z are studying about ancient egypt or rome, i could be teaching kids a,b,and c their abc's. But i am afraid of how much of a destricaton this could become. There was once a "home school" like the one you just mentioned in my county not to long ago, it is now closed but it was the last private school in the county. So that would be a good way for me to start out I think. I also think making it a christian school would also help attract student and parents. I think the hardest part about doing this is going to be finding the money to do it with. any ideas on where some one could go to get funding ?:haha:
     
  21. TeacherGroupie

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  22. FuntoLearn

    FuntoLearn Rookie

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    Some more thoughts, fwiw...

    Hi, Mr. Milton. I didn’t mean to imply that I HAD done research into one-room school houses—just that I have always wondered how it worked and how they were run! The book I referred to in my earlier reply is Understood Betsy, by Dorothy Canfield Fisher—first published in 1917, but still in print. It probably doesn’t have the detailed explanation you are probably looking for, but it is a great fiction book for girls, even today.

    Your plan made me think of Marva Collins--have you heard of her? She’s an educator who got fed up with the public schools and started her own school with very poor, mostly minority students in inner city Chicago. I think she started out basically as a “one-room” school. Her students did so amazingly well that she became well-known and they made a tv movie about her back in the 80’s. She gives seminars on education now- you can google and find her site.

    Since you mentioned that you might like to open a Christian school, I would bet that you could find a church willing to rent you space for a modest sum or even for free—they might consider it a ministry. I know of churches around here that do just that. Since you want to set up the school in such a poor area, I imagine that there might even be Christian organizations that would help with funding and consider it a ministry.

    There are many churches around here that have set up very small schools --so small they fit the students into one or two classrooms—but it might not be the kind of “one-room” school house you envision. They primarily seem to use the ACE (Accelerated Christian Academy), self-teaching, curriculum (they use self-paced workbooks called PACES). Have you heard of these? Some people and students really like ACE schools and thrive with it, but others don't care for them. Some schools that use them do add in other types of supplemental classes and lessons, though.

    Alpha Omega Press also has “Switched on School House” which is a computer based, self- taught and graded (quizzes and tests on the computer) curriculum that is much better, imho, than ACE. I remember reading an article about someone who did use Switched on Schoolhouse (SOS) very successfully in what was basically a secular, private, one-room school for kids with bi-polar and similar issues. (I think the link was on the SOS website.)

    K-12 is a yet another self-taught online kind of curriculum that could help with the "teaching load". It is actually used by public school districts in some states for remote students and for homeschoolers (the public schools provide the curriculum and some supervision and then get to keep the students on the books as enrollees to get more funding!)

    Another quick thought: both A Beka and Bob Jones University Press (major Christian school publishers) have information on their websites on how to set up a small Christian school using their materials and/or online or DVD courses.

    Best wishes. Hope this helps give you some ideas.
     

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