Can I vent for a second about discipline and ethnicity?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by miss-m, Jan 19, 2018.

  1. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    I've never met anyone of Haitian descent around here (the Central Valley). We've gotten an influx of Black students lately from Stockton & Oakland, though.
     
  2. viola_x_wittrockiana

    viola_x_wittrockiana Comrade

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    Case in point, zero tolerance policies. The university I attended was in the city that birthed zero tolerance. My classroom management professor was a P in the district at the time of the incident and I ended up student teaching there. The incident took place at an intra-city football game and there ended up being a massive fight in the stands. Some students were suspended, others expelled. Someone got it into their head that the reasoning for different consequences was because some students were black and others white. Jesse Jackson got involved and the Klan threatened to show up (just what a district with a pretty even racial makeup needs). In response, the district came up with zero tolerance in order to avoid inciting further scrutiny. If anyone had bothered to look into the truth of the matter, the incident started with black students as part of a gang-related feud. Gang-related violence is grounds for expulsion, whereas fighting is suspension unless it's a repeat offense.

    In that case, people jumped to conclusions that it was a racist motivation without looking at the details, and we all ended up with zero tolerance as the "fix" that clearly hasn't fixed. The real problem is that virtually the entire district is low SES, which we know is a risk factor for gang involvement, drug use, and dropping out, and there were no programs in place to mitigate the effects of poverty.
     
  3. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Zero tolerance causes more problems than it solves. I do see why your administration chose this route, but not everything that looks one way is the way it truly is. Motivation and intent comes into play in many cases.

    Case in point, the student who shows up in boy scout gear but forgets to take out his pocket knife is very different than the gang member showing up at school with a knife intending and looking for a particular student to assault. Should they both get the same punishment?
     
  4. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    I went to a 100% white (literally) title 1 elementary school. I heard "ax" all of the time growing up. I have distinct memories of trying to tell my friends from down the street how to pronounce "ask" in Kindergarten. My mom, who was a teacher, later told me that the polite thing to do was repeat the phrase correctly rather than calling it out as wrong :smile:. "I seen" was also incredibly common, even from educated adults. That one drove me nuts as a kid too!
     
  5. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Nothing else to say besides the usual “cry racism” comment, eh? :rolleyes:
     
  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    From the Midwest, not much dialect, per se, but I remember my 4th grade teacher stating that if we could show her the "r" in Washington, then she wouldn't correct us. That teacher made a real impact on me! Many years later, and although I am now on the East Coast, still no "r" in my pronunciation of Washington, and I have problems (personally) when "r's" that aren't there are added, as well as ignoring "r's" that are there. I have spent my married life somewhat bugged when "Linda" is pronounced "Linder" and "arbor" is pronounced "ahbah". My son now works close to Washington and I am the only family member besides my son who doesn't add an "r". (Yeah, teacher mom had some influence).

    As far as ax and baphroom, I am less annoyed because it is often a developmental thing. I simply repeat those words correctly without calling them out on the mistakes, hoping against hope that exposure to the correct pronunciation will slowly sink in. When I answer the phone for my husband's business, I often get the comment that I don't sound like I was raised here, and I always think "Thank you, Mrs. Hartley"
     
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  7. viola_x_wittrockiana

    viola_x_wittrockiana Comrade

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    That's why I referred to it as, "the 'fix' that clearly hasn't fixed." My point was that when we jump to conclusions without looking at things from more than one angle, it's easy to take inconclusive evidence to a conclusion that may not be correct. The expelled students weren't expelled because they were black and the white kids given lighter punishment as it appeared to outsiders. There was another factor of gang violence related to the main factor of no opportunities due to low SES.

    Going back to the OP, it's possible that there is systematic racism going on, but it's also possible that the data was skewed by one or two racist schools or that the real correlating factor was SES or something else entirely. There's data to suggest that racism is possibly responsible for the discrepancy, but not enough to start tossing the baby out with the bathwater by calling the system racist. Right now it's more useful to be self-aware and try to check our biases.
     
  8. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    Since it's almost 40 years of data showing this trend in discipline, I have a hard time thinking it's one or two racist schools skewing the whole thing. It's very possible there is something else going on besides a race issue; I just wonder that in all the years of research not many other correlations have been made. SES is inconsistent as a predictor of office referrals, especially for Black students.
    Personally I think it's cultural too - over 80% of teachers are White, and the field is predominantly female. I think there are a lot of cultural expectations that play out differently in White and Black families and it causes tension between students and teachers when those differences aren't adequately considered when developing discipline, expectations, and even how requests are phrased. My Black coworkers phrase things when they teach in very different ways than me. They're excellent teachers and their students know they care about them, but if I said some of the things they say, it would not be as effective for me. Maybe that's personality rather than race; I don't know either way for sure. But there is a noticeable difference in the way Black and White teachers teach.

    However, I think there's a fine line between teachers ignoring cultural differences and being flat out racist, and some biases start culturally and become racist when left unchecked. There's not a lot of history in America of people actually trying to UNDERSTAND other cultures; we jump straight to "acceptance" or "tolerance" but our knowledge of why other cultures do things the way they do is very limited or based on stereotypes. Maybe all that's really needed IS culturally responsive teaching, but it needs to be done in an informed way instead of just "Hey, let's give the kid in this math problem an ethnic sounding name."
     
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  9. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Regarding your last statement, math teachers should not be concerned with cultural sensitivity. That has nothing to do with mathematics, which is a universal language. That’s one thing I constantly reiterate to my students — mathematics is neutral and is the same for everyone regardless of their gender, creed, or ethnic background. I also make sure to reference historical math figures and their contributions to the field of mathematics (i.e. mathematicians who are White, Arabic, Indian, Chinese, etc.) to honor certain cultures, but this kind of thing does not belong in math and science classrooms.
     
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  10. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    I disagree. Cultural sensitivity may not come into math concepts, but it does have to do with teaching strategies and issues of respect, learning styles, and discipline. You can still be a culturally responsive teacher with a universal subject. Your students are not universal.
     
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  11. viola_x_wittrockiana

    viola_x_wittrockiana Comrade

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    I agree that race probably is part of the picture, I just am not ready to say that it's the sole cause or even biggest factor yet. I think it's important to note that schools vary drastically in both racial diversity and behavior management methods. If a school that is 25% black has a disproportionate number of black students with office referrals, I'm going to call a spade a spade and say there's likely some racism going on there. If a school that's 80% black has 90% of referrals from black students, that's a behavior issue, not race. My experiences are across the board. My HS was extremely diverse and I'm willing to say that race was barely in the picture in regards to discipline. My best friend was the token white guy at a school that was 98% black, so I'll venture to say that race wasn't an issue much there either. On the other hand, my HS BF moved to small-town Mississippi senior year, and they were definitely biased at that school. (not saying southerners are racist as a general statement, just that that town had some).

    My students (8th grade) had a very interesting concept of race. We had a fabulous conversation once that started with a baseless complaint about always having to listen to "white people music". (my CT and I were mindful about that- since when is motown and janelle monae "white people music"?) We ended up reaching the conclusion that their concept of race was based on behavior, not appearance. From the examples they gave, Darius Rucker is white, Eminem is black, and I'm being black when I put hot sauce on ramen. According to them, if you're biracial, you are whatever you act like, not what you look like. I don't know if I entirely agree, but it does go along with things like my Kenyan friend being ostracized by students of her own race for "acting white" because she was Catholic and played soccer. She was hardly putting on a facade or cultural code-switching since soccer is huge globally and about a third of Kenyans are Catholic.
     
  12. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    When race is defined by how someone behaves, it will be difficult to change behavior because they will believe that it is ok to say f-you because they are "acting black" and you can't be racist and call them on it without being a racist.

    I guess there are a lot of people who claim racism who do not know what it means.
     
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  13. Peregrin5

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    If you were using the exact dictionary definition of the word "uneducated" to mean 'showing little formal schooling' I guess that would make sense.

    Some of your posts seemed to me to have a tone that you were conflating 'uneducated' with 'ignorant' or 'stupid' and that you considered students who used AAVE to be 'less than' other students. However I understand 'tone' is hard to read on the internet. If I made an incorrect assumption I'm apologize.
     
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  14. Always__Learning

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  15. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Sorry for that. I was not saying that someone who is uneducated is necessarily stupid. As a mathematician, I use strict definitions when I speak and write. I don’t understand why more people don’t use word’s exact meanings when they communicate.
     
  16. webmistress

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    Yes, yes, and yes. All 3 plus more. The thing is, Black kids in private schools or Black kids with professional or highly educated parents, excel extremely well academically and behavioral wise, outscore kids of other races, basically model students.

    So poverty and the trauma that comes with living in certain areas, that's usually going to correlate with discipline problems.
    The racism and bias is so engrained in society, it's "normal" and people won't typically notice their own racism because it's apart of American culture.

    But I also think another key thing, Black kids in poverty, many are bored in school. Their home environments are intense and they have to constantly be "on" in survival mode. Being in survival mode can't be turned off.
    Black culture is also one that's lively with lots and lots of laughter, loudness, music, rhythm, group work and creativity. Growing up in my neighborhood, we spent all day creating and moving and interacting with each other.
    None of those cultural qualities are embedded in school, it's simply, absorb the information from the teacher and then regurgitate that information back.
    The weird thing is I made excellent grades in school, but I used to think I had no creativity. It wasn't until I graduated college that I realized I'm creative (somewhat):) photography, websites, writing, design etc.
    School stunts creativity and Black culture thrives on creativity and expression (from hair, to clothing, to vernacular, let's not even start with the line dances--I can't keep up myself lol).
    Also the kids don't see themselves in the textbooks, that's a factor as well that builds up conflict and disassociation.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2018
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  17. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    Before starting a math lesson, I bet if teachers opened up their lesson talking about a particular Black mathematician, that would immediately make a huuuuuge impact on kids concentration level, behavior, interest and confidence. They will ask more questions than what you'd be prepared to answer about said mathematician or scientist.

    Nothing works 100% of the time of course, but what I am saying is the lessons are a part of connecting with kids and building their trust. You have to connect with them through your lessons. So, whether it's science or math or Language Arts there's no shortage of Black inventors or scientists who made an impact on the material that's about to be taught.

    Introduce the kids to these Black scholars and then let them go home and do more research, they would do it and they would love it. They will be engaged and excited to learn in comparison to how many are now.

    I am way too rusty in the classroom but most recently I have encouraged "failing school students" to watch certain documentaries, movies, and visit certain websites. They come back and tell me what they learned, and this was just by me popping in the school on a biweekly basis, not even being a regular teacher at all.
     
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  18. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    I find that, if anything, I tend to go lenient on black students. It's their parents that tend to come in ready to dispute anything negative I might say behaviorally towards their students, and sometimes it's easier to just let it go.
     
  19. TrademarkTer

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    I do feel rather insulated from this whole issue so it is rather interesting to read people's perspective. I've taught a total of two black students over my six year career. They both did very well as they came from well-educated families and have had peers who have been positive influences.
     
  20. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    That is certainly one way to always be right, isn't it. Claim that people just don't know they are racist but are because you claim so.

    Many things seen by you as racism aren't. Correcting grammar and language is done with all color of students. That isn't racist even though the claim here is that it is.

    I've known well-educated black families and students. Some excel, some are moderate, and some are low academically. All from well-educated black families. Even within that structure, some behave and others don't. It seems to me they are very much like any other family of any race.
     
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  21. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    We had an incident in my area the other year or so. A high school teacher was showing a highly-respected film as part of history. This film used the n-word to highlight issues. The teacher was explaining the social/historical/modern context of the word--in hopes of educating and not offending.

    A student of color apparently only heard teacher mention the n-word. Mom made it a huge deal.
     
  22. RussianBlueMommy

    RussianBlueMommy Comrade

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    Our largest group of referrals is unfortunately black male students. I see with my own eyes, in the classes I work in, that the students I genuinely have the most trouble out of (fights, mouthing, etc) are black or hispanic students. We have our fair share of white students who cause trouble as well, but it is not as often. I don't know why his is ? :(
     
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  23. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    I mentioned some reasons in my earlier post regarding how erasing one's culture and identity for 7 hours a day is emotionally taxing. Black kids in great homes will excel academically, but something may always be missing, at least it was for me and many others, something was always wrong with school through we made good grades. What was wrong was that we never learned a single thing about African and Black scholars and societies, and that is a huge disservice to kids of all races.

    Now take on the other end, a Black child in a rough home and neighborhood environment, and them put them in a school system that is toxic and confusing to Black well being (erasing Black identity, black achievement etc) and yes those are factors that make Black kids way angrier and they will lash out more. White kids see themselves in the textbooks, the movies, the documentaries, the assemblies etc, so they get "a break" from their bad home environments, if they have one. They get to relate to something greater than them and than situation.
    Black kids get no break and have nothing to relate to.

    I'm 41, pretty darn old, (and am teaching myself our history) but I still have to carefully create my mental and emotional breaks from just existing in a world, not a school, but a world that has a certain view of me. The schools are reflections of the world. If I feel completely ignored and invisible as an old 41 year old Black woman in the world, imagine the schools (and every other system) are created to be a reflection of the world and how a child feels who has no clue where their race really came from.

    It's tough and not something most kids, or even most adults can handle without first being aware of what is going on inside of them & why
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2018
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  24. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Oh give me a break. It is somehow more emotionally taxing for Black students to behave in school and excel academically than EVERY other ethnicity out there? Believe it or not, but there are far fewer Native American and Pacific Island students, plus else, than Blacks, and they behave just fine for the most part.

    I have no qualms with learning about the histories of other cultures. It’s important to learn about people-groups of all backgrounds. In fact, I learned about several cultures all through my upbringing. Just to name a few: Chinese, Indian, African, Native American, Japanese, Middle Eastern, etc. My AP World History class had a very multicultural curriculum, as did several other history courses I’ve taken through the years.

    With that said, you need to come to the realization that this country is not a majority Black country. Black people comprise 13.3% of the US population. White people make up 76.9% of the population, according to the July 1, 2016 US Census data. This is why the vast majority of US history focuses on White people because they participate/participated in and shape/shaped the vast majority of historical events. Why don’t you get that?

    When I was a foreign exchange student in Japan the students learned, you guessed it, Japanese history and focused on Japanese historical figures and scholars, even though 0.5% of the population is Korean, 0.4% of the people are Chinese, and 0.6% are not known. And this is also in spite of the fact that there was a large contingency of American exchange students there. That’s how it works in all countries. The histories focus around the denizens that form the majority of the populace. It’s not racism. It’s just how it is.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2018
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  25. Backroads

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    I have no qualms about setting aside time now and then for a little extra focus on minority contributions. I think it does help with solidarity and appreciation of diversity. But a daily thing? When do we teach e everything else?
     
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  26. MsAbeja

    MsAbeja Companion

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    In what world are you living? Native American populations actually often underperform in comparison to black student population, and Pacific Islanders aren't faring much better. If what you're looking for is quiet compliance, then perhaps you're right that Native American and Pacific Islander youths fit that bill. I don't know, I haven't looked into any research on behavior of these minority groups in the school setting. But just a simple review of the literature refutes your assertion that black students are the only ethnicity struggling to find representation and success in our current educational system.

    This link (https://west.edtrust.org/press-rele...ic-islander-students-in-california-schools-3/) describes a CA policy brief that "dispels the myth that Asian American and Pacific Islander students are a monolithic group of high academic achievers... For example, roughly one-third of Asian and Filipino students and more than half of Pacific Islander students come from low-income families. Disaggregating this data by income revealed large disparities in academic performance between higher-income API students and their lower-income peers. As a result, educational outcomes and needs among API students vary widely." TLDR; Pacific Islanders aren't doing well in our schools, but they've been slipping through the cracks because when collecting data on students' ethnicity the forms tend to lump all asians together, thus effectively hiding the fact that many who come from lower SES areas/families are NOT excelling. More on Pacific Islanders: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-...-students-are-slipping-through-cracks-n144281

    And Native American students are doing even worse: "American Indians have the lowest educational attainment rates of any group in the United States. Researchers have attributed this educational disparity gap that American Indians experience to the lack of cultural relevance in mainstream educational settings. American Indian students perceive a cultural bias against them in classroom curriculum as well as pedagogical practices. While some states have passed legislation to support teaching about American Indians, no funding to support culturally relevant curriculum changes or teacher training accompany these measures. Successful American Indian college students learn how to develop a strong academic identity, while retaining strong cultural ties. A continuing educational gap in access to higher education, in a knowledge-based economy affects the socio-economic status of families and tribes. Incorporating tribal values into mainstream schools would not only educational connections for American Indian students, but can also enhance the learning environment for all students." https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877042814001955

    Get your head out of... the sand. I'll go with "the sand" here, since this is a family-friendly forum.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2018
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  27. Backroads

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    But how would a daily lesson on black contributions helps these other minorities?
     
  28. MsAbeja

    MsAbeja Companion

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    Are you being willfully obtuse? The entire system needs a paradigm shift. Who decided that white contributions to the world are the only ones worth talking about? When you deign to "set aside time now and then for a little extra focus on minority contributions" you exude white normativity. We can be better than that. We NEED to be better than that if we hope to close the achievement gap.

    “Most persons have accepted the tacit but clear modern philosophy which assigns to the white race alone the hegemony of the world.” — W.E.B. Du Bois
     
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  29. a2z

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    While I disagree that they outscore kids of other races as a generalization, I do agree some will outscore kids of other races and some won't.

    But my reason for replying to this is because of the insistence that black kids who do poorly do poorly because they don't see black people represented in the curriculum. How can it be that black students who go to private schools or have highly educated parents are excelling when they also don't see black people represented in the curriculum? Makes you want to go hmmmmm. Maybe the idea of "not seeing oneself in the curriculum" is an excuse.

    I honestly think that the problem is that schools (all schools) are not set up to teach those students who are not taught academics outside of school. Kids who come to school already knowing the basics do well because they don't have to be taught. Kids who have people who can pull them up when they don't understand don't need the school to learn. It is more of a guide. We see the true failure of our school systems by those who really need to be taught by the school.

    I'm not saying that we don't try hard, but the truth is our schools are not set up to really teach students the basics so that they can have the knowledge in more difficult subjects. That is why the kids you see excelling in school are the ones that have people outside the school teaching their kids or hiring tutors to teach their kids.
     
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  30. Backroads

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    I'm not talking about white contributions. I am talking about the notion that instead of teaching... information, lessons, skills... people are suggesting using that time for bios.

    Once again... why only black? Is this the extent of your idea for a paradigm shift? Change nothing, just dump in PSAs?
     
  31. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

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    It depends on your content area. In my English classes, I consciously choose to teach the novel Things Fall Apart instead of Heart of Darkness. Both are classic novels about colonialism in Africa; TFA is written by an African author from the African perspective and humanizes both the colonized and the colonizers. HoD is written from a European perspective and effectively dehumanizes everyone involved, but especially Africans who are essentially portrayed as barbaric savages.

    In my World Language classes, I consciously include Francophone culture from Africa, Asia, and North America -- especially the culture of Haiti, since we have a fair-sized Haitian population. I play music from Black French artists, and artists from French-speaking countries, not only because it is awesome and fascinating and the kids love it, but also because it is important to me that my students don't think French is all just baguettes and berets.

    When I taught 8th grade US History, I didn't "whitewash" the stories I told. I told the facts about the Middle Passage. We visited the Museum of the African Diaspora (in San Francisco) where students experienced a (very, very gentle) simulation of being in the hold of a slave ship. I told the honest reason slaves were imported from Africa in the first place, which is because the Native populations were being decimated by the "working conditions" of slavery. One particularly memorable moment was when a student of color asked me, "Ms. Irene, what are you?" I didn't understand what she was asking. "I mean, are you white? If you're white, why are you telling us this bad stuff about white people?" I told her it was because it was the truth. I wasn't embellishing, either -- at that stage in my career, I was literally just reading the textbook aloud a lot of the time. We actually had a good textbook.

    If I taught Math, I would choose to present stories of Black mathematicians and their contributions.

    If I taught Art, we would look at the work of Black artists. Not just in February.

    If I taught Music -- well personally, I don't think it's possible to teach anything related to music from at least the 20th century on without mentioning the contributions of Black culture to our musical history. Hello jazz, blues, rock, pop....None of it would exist as it does now.

    We constantly make choices as educators about what we choose to include in the curriculum, and how. I personally choose to make sure my students are represented in the curriculum as much as possible. Since my students are only about 30% white, I actually feel like I am not going far enough yet to represent the beautiful diversity of cultures they embody. I need to include more Latino/a authors, and more women, too. It's a work in progress!
     
  32. ms.irene

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    Following your "logic," then, 13% of our curriculum should focus on Black contributions. I don't have data on this, but I would be willing to bet that in most classrooms, this is not currently the case.
     
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  33. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

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    Out of curiosity, where do you teach that this is possible?
     
  34. MsAbeja

    MsAbeja Companion

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    Quote is yours, emphasis mine.

    The point here is that you might be able to argue that students from other minority groups "behave better" than black students. Again, I'm not even sure that's an accurate statement, but assuming that it is, is quiet compliance coupled with low academic achievement really preferable?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 2, 2018
  35. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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    I teach in an affluent suburb in NJ. I teach around 120 students each year. We do have lots of Asian American students, but very very few African Americans.
     
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  36. MsAbeja

    MsAbeja Companion

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    It's possible to teach the content while embedding information about minorities that is germane to the discussion/lesson. Or, teaching the standards, but using diverse perspectives from which to present the information. ms.irene's post on the subject has excellent suggestions.

    I certainly believe that most teachers are creative enough to increase their representation of the diversity of our nation and world without cutting coverage of the standards to plop in bios and PSAs. And, I don't think anyone suggested that only Black history/narrative should be represented.
     
  37. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Someone did suggest beginning each lesson with a biography on a
    Black expert of the field.

    I simply think there are better ways to do this.
     
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  38. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I kind of feel the same way. Except there aren't as many major contributions to science by black people. And I don't believe in forcing an issue just to make it fit. Meaning, I'm not going to seek out an obscure reference/discovery just because a black person made it. In my set of standards, almost all of the major contributors were white European men. I know plenty of people of different races, genders, nationalities contributed to science. But they didn't make the major discoveries that are part of my standards. I'm happy to show Neil deGrasse Tyson when he speaks about astronomy. But that's because he is an entertaining astrophysicist who is in a lot of educational videos. Not because he is black.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2018
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  39. Always__Learning

    Always__Learning Comrade

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    I agree with the comments about paradigm shift. I really think our whole system is built on white middle class values (which I am), so it is easy for me to fit into the mold, but it isn't meeting the needs of many of our students.

    In Canada, First Nations students are under performing white students and where data is collected, both Black students and First Nation students are more likely to be suspended and less likely to graduate than white peers (to the best of my understanding even when socio-economics is accounted for).

    So, as an educator I feel I need to ask. How can I better support my students? And I think there are a whole lot of things we need to consider. For example, Canada's residential school history has a powerful impact. So I think that yes we need to talk about diversity but we have to go much further than that: trauma informed practices, restorative practices, culturally relevant teaching and learning practices, increased education for educators, more diversity in our educational staff are a starting point but at least in Canada I think we have a lot more to do to start to address the inequity.
     
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  40. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    I truly wish that all minority students would perform well academically and behave. What I don’t think helps is that public school teachers, in particular, are constantly telling them that they are victims. That is counterintuitive because they will stay with that victim mentality if that is all they ever hear.

    They need to be told that they are capable like any other student regardless of their race, that their teachers have high expectations of them, and they are no different. That is what I tell all of my students and students perform well academically at about the same rates, in spite of their racial differences.

    I tell ALL of my students on the first day of class to leave any ghettoness at the door when they walk in and to expect to be worked hard. I require all of my students to speak and write using proper English and to respect one another, but I make sure that they can still be teenagers and have fun. I’m strict to a fault, but I never tell my students that they are victims.
     

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