Can I use my education degree for anything else?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by Memom2, Jul 26, 2013.

  1. Memom2

    Memom2 Rookie

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    Jul 26, 2013

    I think I need to consider moving on. I have applied for about 500 jobs in the last three years and had two interviews. I just don't understand, I graduated at the top of my class. Apparently I just look bad on paper. Anyway, my current job situation is becoming unbearable very quickly. What other occupations would fit with my degrees. I just completed my Master's in education as well.
     
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  3. Teacher Gii

    Teacher Gii Companion

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    Jul 26, 2013

    I've only really been out of school for a year and a half and have been looking for a teaching position with no success so far. I don't really plan on giving up but I have wondered the same thing myself. Like, what else could I be doing with my degree while I wait for a teaching position?
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    You're an educated, intelligent person. You have good interpersonal skills, some technology capabilities, can write well... Any business with customer service, sales, marketing departments would be a possible fit.
     
  5. SCTeacher23

    SCTeacher23 Comrade

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    I agree with customer service/sales. I know so many people who have jobs in other areas that are not their actual major. A lot of jobs just require a "bachelors degree" and it doesn't matter what it is. I can speak from experience that I worked in customer service for about a year and a half while searching. I was obviously hoping to land a teaching position, but since this job paid a decent salary, full benefits, paid vacation, I figured I could make a career out of it worst case scenario.
     
  6. Memom2

    Memom2 Rookie

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    Thank you! :)
     
  7. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    The question of your thread is the million dollar question. I know a LOT of teacher knew what else they could do with their degree. Tutoring on the side isn't exactly a dream career...just an extra money on the side type gig. I've heard about writing for textbook companies, but how often do those opportunities come up?
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Aliceacc used to do some part time writing gigs....nice extra money but hard to get into for a full-time career, as is editing. Best to re-package one's marketable skills that I highlighted in my earlier post...companies are not incredibly imaginative in seeing how a teaching degree 'fits', so candidates have to sell themselves and their skills ( truthfully this applies to ANY job one is seeking, INCLUDING teaching).
     
  9. Rainbowbird

    Rainbowbird Groupie

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    Jul 26, 2013

    If you live near a college or university, they often advertise jobs requiring a bachelor's degree with full benefits. I have seen many office manager, program assistant, director of programming, etc. There are also academic advisor jobs but those are few and far between and very competitive.

    I have also seen grant programs being run by my local university that place students as volunteers in local school systems, or they also hire teachers to do research and/or interventions for priority districts. They advertise for managers and assistants to run these programs. A friend of mine is doing that right now, because she gave up on the teaching career. :(

    I will be considering these type of jobs if I don't land a teaching position by next year. I'm giving it one more shot after this year. I'm 46 so I really don't have years and years to be looking around and waiting.
     
  10. Milsey

    Milsey Habitué

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    All that knowledge going to waste. You might consider going on Jeopardy! I auditioned a few months ago.
     
  11. DKM

    DKM Rookie

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    Experience is the name of the game. I had over 10 interviews so far and the reason is because principals like of the years of experience I have (they were all upfront about it). Unfortunately it's about paying your dues. I went through hell during my first year by working a long-term substitute assignment at an alternative school. NOBODY wanted to spend a whole year teaching those kind of students and I was desperate for real experience after having to be a substitute for the second year in a row (2009). It opened a LOT of doors, helped me gain a lot of references, and give me the experience I needed to be a highly effective teacher on classroom management on an extreme level. Not many people enjoy working in an alternative school environment because it is STRESSFUL, but it teaches you how to handle students who have very little respect for teachers, understand where the kids are coming from, and building positive relationships with them from the bottom of the barrel. I also worked for a national program that that was geared for college preparation during 2 years and it opened even more doors- many of the teachers I worked alongside with during those programs all had master degrees in teaching or law and couldn't find work (I was the only one with a bachelor's).

    Medical billing does hold the same skills as teaching, but it does not pay well. You will make only half, but much of the training program is under a year. If I do not find a teaching career, I am going into IT (network engineering) since it's a required 21st century skill. Associate's degree (IT companies don't accept master's), less than 2 years and will have my certs. If colleges are already turning into on-line schools and my home state is slowly drifting to cyber high schools... teacher cuts are going to be even more prevalent. However, network engineers or IT specialists has to keep those schools and businesses that rely on internet running. They do less work than a teacher, don't have to bring work home, and starting pay is the same as a teacher's salary. Plus you do not need a higher education to hold a job in IT- just experience and updated certs.
     
  12. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    I was able to land a job at a software company as a coach. I train clients who purchased our software on how to use it. I found this particular job on indeed.com. Look around! You'd be surprised! I was able to get an interview at another company as a media specialist. Lots of interesting jobs out there!
     
  13. Memom2

    Memom2 Rookie

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    Thank you for the suggestions! I feel like I am caught between a rock and a hard place. The job I am in now may be hurting my future ability to be hired in a public school, but it is experience. I also just do not think I can handle one more year of this, but the pay is decent. I am 38 and feel that time is running out, I need a career.
     
  14. futureteach24

    futureteach24 Companion

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    Jul 26, 2013

    subbing
    Also, have you applied for any positions in informal educational settings. Those can help you gain experience and some of them are even full-time careers.
     
  15. LovesELA

    LovesELA Rookie

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    Aug 3, 2013

    I don't really know your living situation, family, kids, etc....but cruise companies are almost always hiring for youth staff. I left teaching after about 3yrs of struggling to get something full time and just doing per diem subbing because I couldn't afford my rent or bills anymore on that salary. I worked for Carnival for 2years and would have stayed longer if I hadn't met my husband there.

    You get to travel, most medical and dental is covered, there are no fees aside from taxes taken out of your pay (pay differs depending on what age group you work with and of course what company you join), and you get to work in the most amazingly diverse environment imaginable! Its not so much lesson planning, in fact most days it seems like just playing, but there are the tough sides like paperwork, and ship politics. It can be difficult because your supervisor may change several times during a 6 month contract and your colleagues will come and go at a regular pace.

    The upside to the constantly shifting crew though is that it also applies to the guests. Think of how you get a headache when you have that one bad apple in your class and you have to deal with them and working on changing their behavior for the whole school year....on the ship, if you get a bad kid or two...do the best you can and then they're gone in less than 7 days! :)

    Youth programs on ships are soooo much more than the "daycare" that everyone refers to them as. Staff there work much harder. We are there to educate, get kids involved, help them meet new people, and have fun. Colleagues are from all over the world and sometimes so are the guests. You face children with a myriad of different needs every time a new cruise starts and (as far as I know), none of the companies exclude children or disallow them to participate because of special needs, so you can use all those teacher skills to figure out how to effectively adapt activities and programs on the fly in order to make sure special needs children fit in the best they can.

    But you gotta be willing to make the sacrifice....6-7 months out to sea, 1-2 month long vacations, free internet, but sometimes if-y service. Even as a parent tho its do-able, I know lots of mothers working on ships to support their families with grandparents or spouse watching after the kids at home. And seems to be no age limit either...I've seen everything from 18-60 years old!

    So if you're looking for something different, way out of the box, cruising is truly the way to go!
     
  16. Global Teacher

    Global Teacher Companion

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    Aug 3, 2013

    As you can see from my signature, this is something I have been very closely involved with. Teaching abroad at an international school can be a great opportunity for teachers who are having trouble finding jobs domestically.

    Depending on where you apply to, the job market is generally far less competitive than it is in the US, and the pay is quite good. It's a great experience, but it naturally presents many of its own challenges as well.
     

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