Can I transfer a California Preliminary Credential out of state?

Discussion in 'Student & Preservice Teachers' started by audioblood, Dec 17, 2017.

  1. audioblood

    audioblood Guest

    Dec 17, 2017

    Hi there, I'm currently a senior at CSULB in California, and I'm about to graduate with my degree in English Education in the spring, and I am on track to begin the credential program at CSULB in Fall 2018.

    My fiance and I are planning to move out of state in the next few years, ideally as soon as I am done with school. We're dreaming about Colorado, but are very unsure still as to where we'd like to end up.

    Does anyone have any ideas as to where I can find more information in regards to transferring a preliminary credential out of California? We would prefer not to stay in California for the 2 year induction period for my credential. I'm finding a lot of information on reciprocity for clear credentials, but I have no idea how it works for preliminary credentials.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated!!
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Dec 18, 2017

    Teaching licenses don't really "transfer". Many states share similar requirements, though, so if you're qualified in one state you're likely qualified (or close to qualified) in another. The only way to find out for sure whether you're qualified in a different state is is to research the state where you're planning to move. Call their state licensing office and start asking questions. Maybe even go ahead and submit what you have and see where it gets you.
     
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  4. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Phenom

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    Dec 18, 2017

    I was under the impression that since California credentialing standards are so high, that most state will accept them if you transfer. I believe this is called California reciprocity. However, I might be mistaken, so I would do what Caesar753 suggested.
     
  5. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Dec 18, 2017

    CA licenses don't work in NV. We used to get a lot of Cali teachers, but that slowed way down once our state requirements changed and Cali teachers had to do more work to get NV licenses.
     
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  6. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Dec 18, 2017

    While the requirements are similar or greater in California, the problem isn't preparedness. It's ticking the boxes specific states want ticked, whatever that means for that particular state. With some negotiation you can get a state to accept your teaching credential from out of state usually for a one year period or so (called a reciprocal license) but in order to continue teaching in that state they want you to complete the checkboxes including taking the competency tests specific to that state or a state constitution test. Or they want you to re-fingerprint and they may or may not want to accept a lot of a credits you earned out of state that went towards your payscale before because they have different requirements.

    If you don't meet those requirements within that time limit you lose your license for that state. Some states want those requirements met even before they allow you to teach at all regardless of how much experience you have.

    It's more of a bureaucratic thing than a teacher preparedness thing. And no credential commission for any particular state talks to any other state so their requirements are all different. Even if you technically meet the requirements they want you to meet them in the specific way particular to that state.

    In other words transferring your credential is not a fun process. It's doable but you'll get a headache and its going to be more than just showing them your CA credential and getting a teaching job in most cases. It will also likely cost you a good chunk of money.
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2017
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  7. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Phenom

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    Dec 19, 2017

    Good to know for any California teachers that want to transfer to NV!
     
  8. Clovisdad

    Clovisdad Rookie

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    Feb 9, 2020

    Researching this topic for my own situation. "Reciprocity" does not mean "equals" when it comes to honoring other states' teaching credentials. Some states are going to want you to take a state history course, for example. Remember how we had to take one to get our CA credential? However, if your paperwork looks good, and they need you, many states will hire you with the agreement that you meet their requirements within a certain time.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2020
  9. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Feb 16, 2020

    Clovis,

    This thread is over 2 years old -- just FYI.

    Reciprocity requirements are completely different, state to state. You mentioned a state history course -- I've changed states 3 times over my career via reciprocity, and I've never had to take a state history course or any other coursework -- so I think saying "most states require it" is not a generally accepted thing, and may be a bit misleading. It may have been that way in your experience, but I don't think that transfers to "all."

    I've had received a full 5-year license, as opposed to a provisional 1-year license, each time. My most recent move was last summer (2019) and I was given a full 5-year license, but I am required to become ESOL and Reading Specialist endorsed by the end of those 5 years in order to renew my license the next time. Both the ESOL and RS endorsement are required by law in my new state -- all teachers must have them. It is a new law, so all teachers in the state without these certifications (the ESOL for all levels, and the RS for elementary school teachers, and upper teachers who teach language arts in any form) have to get them.

    The original poster (from 2017) was talking about a preliminary credential -- and those are not typical covered by reciprocity. When I was considering moving this last time, I researched it in about 17 states, so I can't speak to all states, but I can say that every one of them I looked at would not grant a license based on reciprocity.

    The best way to find out the requirements are to go to the website of the DOE at the new state you are considering. They clearly list all of the ways, including reciprocity, that you can obtain a teaching license in their state. Once you have decided that you meet those requirements, the best next step is to apply. You don't want to apply before learning the requirements, because you must pay the application fee and is usually between $75 and $250, depending on the state, and they don't refund it if you don't meet the requirements. If you don't meet the requirements, you certainly don't want to spend the money, because it is non-refundable.

    I know that in the state I moved to last summer (2019) the DOE here would not take phone calls with specific questions. The only way to get a response was to submit your questions on an online form via an email, along with official mailed copies of all of your transcripts, and the turn-around time for a response was about 7 months! It was much easier to read it for yourself, and then go ahead and apply. I'm sure at some states, it is much easier, but here, the backlog was incredible. Once I applied, I got my letter in less than 1 month stating that I met requirements (which allowed me to get an actual teaching job) and the teaching license itself took about 4 months to process.

    If you are fortunate enough to know what school district you plan to teach at, you can often contact their credentialing staff for assistance, but the DOE in my new state, all you got was an automated answering service.
     
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  10. Clovisdad

    Clovisdad Rookie

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    Feb 16, 2020

    Changed it to "some states," thank you.
     
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