Can anyone help a student out?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by thetinymouse, Sep 5, 2017.

  1. thetinymouse

    thetinymouse New Member

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    Sep 5, 2017

    I need to interview 2 teacher for my Classroom Management class and I don't know any teachers personally. If two elementary level teachers could take a moment to answer the questions below and tell me anything you think a education student should know about classroom management I would greatly appreciate it!

    What grade do you teach?

    Why did you want to become a teacher?

    What is your philosophy of classroom management?

    What would you say works the best, and why?

    What would you say works the least, and why?

    What is one aspect of classroom management that you have to had difficulty with?

    What did or do you do to resolve it?
     
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  3. Always__Learning

    Always__Learning Comrade

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    Sep 5, 2017

    I would suggest going to a local school and explaining your need. I really think you really will get more out of this from having a conversation with a teacher.
     
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  4. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Sep 6, 2017

    ,
     
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  5. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Sep 6, 2017

    ,
     
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  6. thetinymouse

    thetinymouse New Member

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    Sep 6, 2017

    Thank you so much Leaborb!
    I work full time as well and go to school full time so it would be very difficult to meet face to face with someone. I figured online would be the best way to reach someone.

    Thanks again!:):)
     
  7. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    ,
     
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  8. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    ,
     
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  9. WarriorPrncss

    WarriorPrncss Companion

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    Sep 6, 2017


    In my area you're not allowed to go into classrooms to observe or volunteer unless you have paperwork and a livescan (about $75)... so, it's hard unless you already have contacts.
     
  10. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Here's the thing....many of us are in the first weeks of school and dancing as fast as we can. As much as some would like to help out, it's just kind of exhausting right now to answer that many questions after a day with new kiddos, schedules, paperwork, etc...
     
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  11. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    So people asked you an innocent question and this was your reaction? I'm hoping you dramatized for effect. If not, you should probably consider if this reaction is appropriate.

    To the OP:

    Every education program hires current teachers to teach. Ask the department chair who currently teaches and then email them directly and see if you could speak with them 10 minutes before their class begins.

    You jeed to start making connections in your field. If you aren't comfortable, you need to get comfortable.
     
  12. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Sep 7, 2017

    I kind of agree and disagree with some of the above. First my agreement--I would recommend an attempt to meet with a couple of teachers live. It would be well worth the time and effort. Probably the best way is to call a couple of principals up on the phone and explain the situation; a secretary might answer first, but then as time allows the principal or a teacher might contact you at their convenience. Full time study and work is difficult, and I sympathize with your situation, but if it's at all possible, I'd try to squeeze it in. An extended idea would be to email teachers in foreign countries asking if they'd like to be interviewed via Skype; I would approach this cautiously though; some countries do not have email restrictions and unscrupulous people might respond to your email or sell your address. Skyping might be overkill for the assignment, but you might also obtain a feeling for diverse philosophies and which philosophies are also similar. Another good source would be private schools and mission schools (again being cautious in foreign countries).

    Now my disagreement--although an Internet forum such as this contains real teachers and people pretending to be teachers, the anonymity of such a forum can provide more frank discussions. You might obtain information from this avenue that you'd never receive in a face to face discussion. As long as your professor is in agreement with this avenue, I'd say go for it. Overall, the more information you can obtain, the better.
    I will return to this forum later today to answer your questions specifically, but I just looked at the time and it's time for me to leave.
     
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  13. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Sep 7, 2017

    What grade do you teach? I've taught elementary.

    Why did you want to become a teacher? When I was a teenager, a TV show, Lucas Tanner, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucas_Tanner , sparked my interest in teaching, but I was also interested in psychology at that time. In college, I graduated in psychology, but my main interest was in learning psychology. Upon graduating, my new next door neighbor was a counseling psychologist, and in talking with her and exploring beginning employment situations, I decided to explore teaching and never regretted that decision.

    What is your philosophy of classroom management? I'm glad you used the word management rather than control. I am the manager in the classroom, but not the boss; in other words, I manage the classroom consistently according to a specified plan of rules and procedures: the students are not there to serve my wishes for an easy day, but instead, the students and I are there to accomplish that day's plans. I do not believe in raising my voice. I speak calmly. (I literally practice this with pretend invisible students and pretend situations as a drill to ensure I don't react negatively in real situations). I personally have disagreements with overemphasizing operant and classical conditioning, such as excessive rewards or punishments. I do believe that in a social setting, penalties are expected and beneficial to that society. This might be a few minutes delay in recess (5 minutes seems like an eternity to a kid) or other appropriate penalties. I do not agree with giving extra rewards to encourage students who experience more difficulty in adhering to procedures nor do I agree with constantly changing rules to match changes in student behavior; I find consistency works best. My most important management procedure is to listen. Listening achieves more progress than any lecturing and scolding. Maybe that's why I have two ears but only one mouth.

    What would you say works the best, and why? Discussing behavior with the students, especially listening and offering suggestions, works best. It's also helpful to check with the student the next day or in a few days to see how they're progressing with the situation. Consistent daily routines also solve many problems before they start. I also encourage students to talk with each other at appropriate times and I encourage students to read. Languaging increases the students ability to rely on their upper brain and think through situations rather than immediately responding according to their lower brain. Also helpful in this regard is mathematics. The logical thinking of math builds up the same neurons that are used in daily logical thinking even when numbers, shapes, etc. are not directly involved. "Whole maths" activities provide great spare time activities that increase the students' logical thinking and other important upper brain neurons.

    What would you say works the least, and why? Inconsistency. Changing procedures does cause an immediate calm in the classroom, but that's only because it unnerves the students. The calm is temporary, and worse yet, it doesn't build up the students' behavioral learning. Worse yet is trying to up the rewards to match the misbehavior. Rather than making the procedures comply to the students' behavior, the students need to learn to comply with the procedures. That doesn't say procedures should remain absolute. Sometimes a procedure ages obsolete or sometimes a better procedure is discovered; in these rare situations, I would discuss the situation with the class and why the change is necessary. The class appreciates such improvements when needed.

    What is one aspect of classroom management that you have to had difficulty with? Parents sometimes make a mountain out of a molehill. Surely some situations are very serious and require serious attention, but normal infractions are best handled matter-of-factly; the student is learning how to behave and now has an opportunity to improve and learn not to repeat the misbehavior.

    What did or do you do to resolve it? I respect the opinions and concerns of parents. The most important tool, again, in addressing parental concerns are my ears. I listen. In a parent conference, I do the least amount of talking. I discuss the situation, but I do not try to control the parent. The parent is the parent, not me. I do offer suggestions, and usually these conflicts are resolved positively.

    Books I would recommend for you:
    Kohn, Alfie. Punished by Rewards: The Trouble with Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A’s Praise, and other Bribes. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1993 (I don't agree strictly with no penalties, and I do think rewards can be a fun addition, but intrinsic motivation is stronger than extrinsic).

    Miller, Donalyn. The Book Whisperer: Awakening the Inner Reader in Every Child. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2009

    Siegel, Daniel J. and Tina Payne Bryson. No-Drama Discipline: The Whole-Brain Way to Calm the Chaos and Nurture Your Child's Developing Mind. New York: Bantam, 2014. E-book ISBN is 978-0-345-54805-4. Library nbr. is 649.1 (Best book I've ever read on this subject)!!!
     
  14. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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    Sep 7, 2017

    You're all forgetting the obvious---just make up interview answers. Oops...
     

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