Can a school advertise a position, then decide to cut it?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by greenbay33, Mar 13, 2013.

  1. greenbay33

    greenbay33 Rookie

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    Mar 13, 2013

    As people know, i'm a social studies candidate and given that Social Studies is not part of the core curriculum a lot of positions are cut. Anyway, can a school advertise for a position and then cut it. I understand it happens, but it seems dishonest to advertise for a position that doesn't exist. I heard this happened to a school where a good friend of mine taught. They needed a teacher and he recommended me since I had been a student of his in high school. Well they simply got rid of the position and had other teachers cover social studies classes. So is this legal, and if so, why advertise the position when they won't hire anyone
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Mar 13, 2013

    Yes. It happens all the time. Usually they are expecting to have the funding for a position but it gets cut for reasons outside their control--maybe not enough students signed up, maybe staffing funds were cut across the board, maybe another teacher transferred into the position.

    I've never heard of Social Studies not being part of the core curriculum. In my district, students are required to take several years of Social Studies in order to graduate. We consider it to be part of the core curriculum (whether it's part of "common core", I don't know).
     
  4. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Mar 13, 2013

    Social studies isn't part of the common core, but it's still required.

    I have known of schools advertise for a position and then cut the position. It can happen because enrollment wasn't as high as expected, a teacher decided to return from leave early, the board decides to increase class sizes, money wasn't available, etc. There are many reasons that schools may post a position and then decide later to not fill the position.
     
  5. MissD59

    MissD59 Comrade

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    Mar 14, 2013

    Yes, and they can also advertise a position, but have a candidate in mind already.
     
  6. ayla

    ayla Companion

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    If they hire you into the position, with a contract and everything, if your position is cut, they still have to find somewhere else for you (they have put you under contract). This happened twice in my experience: once, when I was interviewing, the principal told me their enrollment might not be high enough and I might be transferred to another school. That position in general was not a good fit for me so I have no idea how it turned out for whoever was hired. Second, a friend of mine was hired and they told her up to 2 weeks into the school year she might be moved to another school because of enrollment, but to this day she is still at her original school.
     
  7. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Mar 14, 2013

    Careful. This statement is 100% false for anyone in the state of North Carolina.
    I would think that it can vary from not only state to state, but district to district. And any district could get around it if they put an enrollment/funding clause in the contract.
     
  8. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Mar 14, 2013

    And in Texas.
     
  9. redtop

    redtop Companion

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    Mar 15, 2013

    Of course they can advertise a position, then decide not to hire anyone for it.

    There are a million reasons. How about "We didn't find anyone qualified. Yes, we had that guy who walked on water and healed cripples, but when he turned the water into wine the vintage was a little too sweet - nah, not qualified enough."

    I completely disagree that they "owe" you another position if you are cut, although it might depend on the union contract. Ever heard of "Last hired first fired?" However, it's very reasonable, before you quit another job, to call and say "I just wanted to make sure this position is 100% to happen."
     
  10. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Mar 15, 2013

    Sometimes positions are posted because of board policy even though the position is filled within.Sometimes a position is pulled because none of the applicants seems to be a fit...these positions are often filed again later.
     
  11. ayla

    ayla Companion

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    Mar 16, 2013

    I didn't know that! In Virginia once you are signed, you are good to go.
     
  12. RobertTexasMath

    RobertTexasMath Rookie

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    Mar 16, 2013

    I know district that advertise positions, that have no intention in filling. They advertise to get a pool of applicant just in case someone resigns. Some of them state this, which I'm all right with. Others do not. I'm not sure if it is legal or not but even if it is illegal I doubt anything can be done about it.
     
  13. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Mar 16, 2013

    My reaction to the title of this post was - of course. They can do whatever they want. It is an employer's market, plain and simple.
     

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