Can a 3-year-old Really Learn How to Read?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by teacherman1, Dec 9, 2013.

  1. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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    Dec 9, 2013

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  3. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    There are a lot of factors involved in precocious reading. Some children will. Some children won't. Making it fun and exposure from birth certainly help, but saying a blanket "yes" is terribly unfair to the children in that exact situation that won't.
     
  4. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    There is a difference between saying words on print and reading. Yes, a 3 year old can do both but is far more likely to just say the words than hold true comprehension.
     
  5. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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    I'm not saying that all 3-year-olds will learn how to read. I said a 3-year-old.
    All kids are different and I'm the first to say that...
     
  6. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    I have a friend whose daughter suddenly learned how to read at the age of 4. Her preschool teacher caught her reading a book one day, and informed her parents, who weren't even aware that she could read. They didn't formally teach her how to read or anything-she just picked it up on her own. She was reading chapter books (fluently, accurately, an comprehending) in kindergarten.
     
  7. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    The point isn't can they read. Some can. Most can't. That is okay. The point is should they read? Yes, if they naturally learn through their everyday experiences, mostly doing lots of play-based activities. No, if they are expected to learn, and the adults push them, or make them feel like failures if they aren't ready.
     
  8. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    I know a few pushy parents who have done "Your Baby Can Read." So frustrating... :rolleyes:
     
  9. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    I did! ... learn to read at age 3, that is, lol!
     
  10. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    I learned how to read at age 4. My sister made me. I actually still remember our 'lessons', full of tears and yelling at me, calling me stupid, etc. But in the end we had a good relationship and learning at that early age was a good thing.
    Can every child learn? not necessarily. Those, who do learn, are they smarter? Not necessarily. Is there a specific way to teach? No.
    So there is no one definitive answer.
     
  11. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    I knew plenty of words at three. Mom said I read the exit sign at the store when I was three. Apparently I saw it and said, "Exit. E-X-I-T." When she asked me now I knew that, I told her I saw it on television. It was Sesame Street or The Electric Company. I memorized my favorite books, and I recognized words. I was reading well by the time I went to first grade at five. I skipped kindergarten. I just loved books. Mom read to me a lot. Nobody pushed me to learn to read early, though.
     
  12. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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    I agree, sc
    I have four children and 3 grandchildren and none "took to reading" as early as this little one. Everything is play based with absolutely no pressure.

    Her 9-year-old sister and 10-year-old brother love to read with her, too, and their bedrooms are full of books. I think that also makes a difference.

    I've been doing "Papa Care" on Monday's and Tuesdays for my daughter since September, so the days involve a lot of reading up in the tree house and in front of a fire.

    It's better than TV and video games, right?

    Lots of fun, lots of love :)
     
  13. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    My daughter read at two or so...her brother was nine years older and books were a major part of our lives. My son was 18 months old and I left him with my parents for a week. When I returned he was doing addition and subtraction word problems with my dad with answers to ten or so. I thought he had just memorized them, but when I gave him my own problems he could still do them. He had trouble in school because teachers want each step in the math equation and his brain skips steps. He can look at problems and give you the answer. My dad was like that. They would come up with brain teasers to call each other about each week. In fact the night my dad died, he and my sixth grade son spent two hours on the phone doing math problems together.
     
  14. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    I've read some research that says early readers are usually no better or worse than their peers by the end of 3rd grade. So I guess they all catch up to each other in the end.
     
  15. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I've seen this research as well.
     
  16. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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    How to Tell if a Child is Ready to Read...

    From an article on Homeschool.com

    The best advice is to teach your child to read when they are ready, regardless of how young or old they may be. Reading specialists have observed that children display certain behaviors when they are ready to read. Specifically, the child:

    Knows the alphabet

    Likes to look through books and magazines

    Knows the parts of the body

    Knows his own first and last name and can pronounce it clearly

    Can express herself verbally

    Can repeat a sentence of six to eight words

    Knows that writing carries a message

    Pretends to read

    Understands that reading goes from left to right

    Comprehends and can answer questions about a short story

    Can look at a picture and tell you a story about it

    Can write his own first name

    Reading experts say that there are certain things parents can do to
    encourage their child to become a lifelong reader:


    Read to your children—often! Even teens enjoy hearing a good book.

    Be a good role model and let your children see you reading.

    Let your children read books that are easy for them. This will make reading more fun for them and less of a chore.

    Avoid assigning or asking kids to do book reports. Instead, casually talk about the books they have read. How many books would you read if you had to write a book report after reading them.

    Keep books out around your house, in your car, and in your bathroom.

    Give books as gifts and rewards.

    Allow your children to select the books they check out at the library and let them check out as many as they can carry (within library limits). Don't weed through their choices unless they are very young.

    Imagine the joy of being with your child when he first learns to read. Cuddled up on your lap, your child will feel secure and loved while taking this big step. When veteran homeschoolers look back, their fondest memories are of reading to their children in front of the fireplace, reading while snuggled under the covers on a rainy day and reading late into the night because the book was just too good to put down. Often parents believe that once their child can read on their own, they don't have to read to them anymore. Keep reading. When you read to a child, you are teaching her much more than the material covered in the book. Reading and cuddling together are the moments that connect families forever and lay the foundation for children to become lifelong readers.
     
  17. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    I was reading at 3. I used to play with magnetic alphabet letters on the fridge when my mom was making dinner, and she'd help me sound out my "creations."
     
  18. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    My GS demanded that his PS teacher teach him to read at age 4. She did.
     
  19. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I'm sure that many can. One of my kids learned soon after she turned four. Only a couple of weeks away from being three. So a child that is smarter than mine and had someone actively teaching the child could definitely do it.
     

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