calling out - how do you respond?

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by TulipsGirl, Feb 19, 2008.

  1. TulipsGirl

    TulipsGirl Cohort

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    Feb 19, 2008

    I have a student who calls out - often... I know what your thinking: "Don't we all?"... but here's my question:

    Sometimes I think a student is trying to act out for whatever reason ex: to get attention... but I really don't think that she's trying to annoy anyone here. I honestly think that she is just a bright girl who has some impulsivity issues and it comes out because she gets excited about what she knows... but its starting to annoy me. She'll finish my sentences(!). She'll call out the names of the students as I am passing back projects, b/c she knows whose is coming next, she'll call out answers to questions I ask.

    There are only so many times that I can ignore it, say "I'm happy to call on someone who raises her hand", "please raise your hand", "the class can't hear me when you are speaking at the same time as me"... Sometimes I wonder if she even hears me saying these things, b/c she'll continue with what she was saying as I talk. It's starting to aggravate me and I don't want to lose my patience with her. What's the right approach here? Ignore? But she is a natural leader and others follow her lead.

    She really is delightful if this issue was not so very distracting to me.


    I tend to be more successful with natural consequences than other systems such as pulling cards etc... Any ideas??
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Feb 20, 2008

    I have, um, a few students like yours. :)

    What seems to work is letting the student know ahead of time that I'm going to call on him for the answer to a particular question. I usually go around while they're working on their practice work, and when I notice that someone did something right, I'll praise them and ask if they'd be willing to let me call on them when we get to that one. Often these kids are so excited because they know that they're going to get called on and have the chance to show off about something that they know is right that they're able to hold it together for the duration of the activity.
     
  4. Poisontipped

    Poisontipped Rookie

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    Feb 21, 2008

    Well, when I ask a question and have some students calling out. I say "I'm going to let student X answer because they have there hand raised." I in particular like this method because it reinforces the behaviour and praises the student that is doing the correct thing.

    Hope I helped.
     
  5. cmw

    cmw Groupie

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    Feb 21, 2008

    Here are some things I do. I get shouter outers when we do trivia each day b-c they get so excited!
    1. I will use the phrase, "I'm looking for hands or quiet hands."
    2. I will turn my back toward the shouter outers & call on those with hands raised on the other side of the room. When they do quietly raise their hand I make sure to call on them.
    3. I will hear someone say a correct answer & call on a person close to them who has their hand up. The shouter outer is always like, "But I said that." I just respond with, "You need to have your hand up so we can hear you." :p
     
  6. bookladyOhio

    bookladyOhio Rookie

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    Feb 21, 2008

    talking out

    Here's something I do that works:

    Say "Raise your hand if you know ( fill in the blank with your question.)"

    or.....

    "Raise your hand if you can tell me........."
     
  7. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Feb 21, 2008

    I don't think this girl is delightful. Is she was, she would raise her hand and take turns like other well-adjusted kids. She may be book smart yet socially ignorant. I'll bet you are not the first person to announce she should raise her hand. In fact announcements are something she is so used to they become background noise hence the talking through and finishing sentences as if she doesn't hear.

    Call-outs are a form of back talk. They may be masked under illusion of excited student yearning for knowledge but real agenda is to rattle teacher and take control. So the real question -- "Who will control this lesson, student or teacher?" is at stake.

    Problem with responding to back talk -- "I'll take a quiet hand", "Please raise your hand to be recognized' etc. is the teacher's words almost guarantee a response -- "But I did have my hand up! You didn't call on me!" - "Oh, sorry. I forgot". With the best of intentions teacher is actually promoting the exact behavior trying to be eliminated.

    Ignoring works if teacher can control the environment which rewards the student -- like kids that laugh when goof-off performs. Or in this case other students starting to call-out as they see the tactic is working. Consider:

    Letter on the Desk

    Create a form letter on school letter head which has spaces to write in student's name, parents, date. In the letter say something like "Dear Mr. and Mrs. _________ ,

    I am having a problem with ___________ and need your help. The problem is be specific and list only one, not a laundry list. I will be calling you within the next couple days to discuss this matter.

    Closing,
    Teacher"

    In private meet with student. Show letter. Calmly insert letter in an envelope and address to parents. Tell student, "When you come into class tomorrow this (letter) will be taped to your desk. You and I are the only ones who know what it is about. If you don't call-out during class then, in front of me, you may tear up this letter and throw it away. However, if you call-out this letter will be going home to your parents."
     
  8. TulipsGirl

    TulipsGirl Cohort

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    Feb 21, 2008

    Thank you all for your responses!
    Loomistrout, I respectfully disagree - she is delightful: she is bright, loves learning new things, has a fantastic sense of humor, is respectful and sincere when I speak to her about her behavior, she is just having a very difficult time transfering these discussions into real change. So I asked for further suggestions. Thank you for your response. I do agree that I need to show her that I am in control of the classroom, and that she therefore needs to control her calling out.

    I'm starting to see that I am partly to blame - I'm not being consistent enough in my consequences with this rule. So today, I had to enforce it 3 times in a row, within a five minute period.
    She was a little annoyed, but she got the point, and was very careful the rest of the day. I see though, that I'm not going to be able to let up on this until she has it completely ingrained...
     
  9. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Feb 21, 2008

    I was thinking in terms of total package. Anyway, good to hear things are heading in right direction. :up:
     
  10. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

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    Feb 22, 2008

    Hi TulipsGirl,

    I completely comprehend what YOU are experiencing it is 100% frustrating while trying to present a lesson, read a story or while trying to encourage other students to participate!

    I have a similar situation with a young girl in my class, she IS very impulsive. She also has a few symptoms of hyperactivity. Constantly moving around in chair etc. She has the same EXACT behaviors you described in your first post.

    I too, have been consistently reprimanding, ignoring and praising. She LOVES the praise, it is key to this issue. They need to know they will get attention if they follow the rules.
    Every time a student takes a bit longer to answer a question, in comes Annie with the right answer. It is difficult to ignore this...I KNOW.

    Recently, I have been researching on how to control impulsive behaviors. Did you try to raise your hand while asking the question? This will automatically make her raise her hand.
    I did discover one tip that really worked! "The Look." She is bright right? So therefore she can pick up on signals.

    Speaking of staring. Eye contact is another big one. It can also be an immensely frustrating time when students throw caution and brain-cells to the wind and begin acting up. Eye contact helped me a lot. Once I knew the kids who struggled to cope with even a five minute lecture I would address my comments to them and look directly at them as I did so. Not in a scary “you’re in trouble way” (although I occasionally did that too!) but in a personal, “I’m addressing this whole thing to you” kind of way. And they liked it. You will also learn the fine art of staring a kid down. I can’t tell you how to do it but I can tell you the first time you succeed it will be a beautiful thing.

    Example, before playing a class game...you say: Do NOT call out the answers. Pause & look directly at her. She will most likely crack a smile and understand your point. I guarantee it won't happen. If it does, you ignore it. You already gave a warning so next step ignore it.

    Where does she sit in the classroom? As this is another VERY important thing for an impulsive child. I think upfront is best, what do you all think is the best seat for a "blurter"?
    Private message me if you need more tips, the more experience I have with this issue the more I learn about what works and does not.

    Others that have posted have wonderful ideas!

    Good luck & do NOT give up! Be consistent.

    -Christine
    :)
     
  11. macinesin

    macinesin New Member

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    Mar 18, 2008

    dfrg

    edgvreghtrhtgh
     
  12. KinderMissN

    KinderMissN Companion

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    Apr 5, 2008

    I teach kinder, so I use the phrase "While Miss N is teaching, my ears listen to kids who raise their hand."
     

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