Calling out all day long

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Jerseygirlteach, Oct 17, 2014.

  1. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    Oct 17, 2014

    Ugh. I need strategies/advice on dealing with a student. First off, he's very sweet. I actually like him a lot, so I feel bad when I have to reprimand him for this, but...

    My goodness, he calls out so much! It's all day, every day. This is a normal 3 minutes in my room:

    Me: Take out your books and study your spelling words for a couple of minutes before the spelling test.

    Student (shouting out): You mean, take out spelling books Mrs. Jersey?

    later...

    Student (shouting out to the entire room): I found a pencil. Johnny, is this your pencil?

    Me: Put your name on your spelling test.

    Student (shouting out): Should I write the date?

    a second later...

    Student (shouting out): What's the date?

    Me: After the spelling test, we have music

    Student (shouting out): What? I thought today was art.

    over and over and over again...

    :(:(:(

    Every time, I tell him not to call out. He swears to me that he's not doing it deliberately. He just cannot remember to stop. In his defense, he spent the last two years in a classroom with a teacher who has a very different style than I do. Calling out is not a problem for her. But he's been in my class for about a month and a half. He needs to stop.

    I have talked to him calmly, I have raised my voice, I have punished him, I have set up a hand signal to remind him when he is calling out. I have rewarded him with praise when he raises his hand rather than calling out. Nothing is really helping, though. It still still happens at least once every 2 or 3 minutes.

    He doesn't seem to lack self-control in any other way. It's just this and it's making me bonkers. Does anyone have a strategy that might work?

    :thanks:
     
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  3. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Oct 17, 2014

    What does he do when you ignore his questions? Will he raise his hand eventually?
     
  4. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Oct 17, 2014

    I have a kid like this too.

    How does he react when he is raising his hand and you don't call on him? I call on mine as often as I can when his hand is up, but I can't choose him to answer every question. When his hand is up and he isn't called on, he freaks out about how not fair it is that he raised his hand but I still didn't pick him.

    The kid I have loves praise. I praise him when he raises his hand and ignore him when he doesn't.
     
  5. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Oct 17, 2014

    It sounds like this kid is not calling out to answer questions during a lesson but calling out to ask the teacher questions (even though the teacher already gave them the information).
     
  6. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    Oct 17, 2014

    Yes, he does. He raises his hand immediately and usually looks frustrated afterwards - with me or himself I don't know.
     
  7. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Oct 18, 2014

    How is it you all only have ONE kid like this?
     
  8. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Oct 18, 2014

    I have many that call out but one that does it all - day - long .

    Can you have the class repeat directions, as in, "Open up to page 20. What page?" Although, my kid usually isn't listening when the class repeats, either.
     
  9. comaba

    comaba Cohort

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    Oct 18, 2014

    I've used a "money" system in the past that rewards good behavior with fake dollars that students can use for pencils, stickers, treats, or privileges. Poor choices lead to fines, or loss of the "money". I started each student with 30 dollars. Doing homework earned a dollar. Those who didn't do it had to pay me a dollar. Same with raising hands/shouting out when I needed to change behavior.

    It doesn't work for every student, but perhaps something like that would work for your student.
     
  10. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Oct 18, 2014

    With my blurters I just use consequences.

    They know it's against the rules. I will give them one warning, and if it happens again, then it's sit at the focus table to work quietly. If it happens again, then it's lunch-time support, where we will spend time practicing to raise our hands quietly and not blurt.
     
  11. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Oct 18, 2014

    I'm curious, I have kids come in to practice too, but what does it look like when you do it? How do they practice raising their hand? I do practicing for a lot of things, but for handraising, I usually have kids write about why it's important.
     
  12. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Oct 18, 2014

    I'll do a roleplay and pretend I'm teaching and tell then to show me the correct way to ask a question or make a comment. We do this repeatedly.
     
  13. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Oct 18, 2014

    I like the hand signal as it is visual. Consider having him draw a pic of himself raising hand on an index card (or?), fold it into a tent and tape it to his desk. A graphic reminder staring back at him may interrupt the flapper mechanism.
     
  14. jojo808

    jojo808 Comrade

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    Oct 18, 2014

    The best thing to do is replace the behavior with something else.

    You could get him a special notebook (I bought the small kind that fit in your hand) and tell him anytime he has a thought to write it down instead of saying something. Depending on the age you could say something like "send the thoughts to your hand" or "don't let the words fly past the gate" or something like that. You could set aside a few minutes each day (or during appropriate time) to review his notes.

    This has worked for some students--not all, but you could try it. Good luck!
     
  15. missrebecca

    missrebecca Comrade

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    Oct 19, 2014

    Or, rather than writing everything, you can have him make tallies on a notecard (or keep track, yourself) every time he shouts out. If he can get through X period of time without X shout outs, he gets a reward. :)

    I tried this with a spontaneous shouter last year, and it helped when I remembered to do it.
     
  16. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Oct 21, 2014


    I had this student once. He was the cutest sweetest boy ever and he really just couldn't control it. A few months in he was driving me INSANE.

    I bought little plastic bracelets at the party store (grey, orange, blue, black since it was a boy) and started him in the morning with twelve bracelets. Every time he called out, he gave me a bracelet. If he had 5 bracelets at the end of the day he got a sticker on a sticker chart (I think he was working to earn a book from scholastic) if he had them ALL left he got a prize from our prize box right away. Gradually I decreased the number of bracelets I gave him and he had to have them all left eventually to earn anything.

    It was a process, I remember in the beginning I took a bracelet away and watched him sit there counting how many he had left and two seconds later he shouts out in the middle of my lesson, "It's okay! I still have nine left!" He sat in front of me on the rug so if he did call out I didn't have to say anything I would just hold out my hand and he'd know to give me a bracelet. I never gave him a second chance. But eventually, I would see him literally clutching onto the bracelets when he wanted to call as if they were a physical reminder not to call out. The first day he had them all left in the afternoon was monumental. I didn't start this until maybe March, but the problem was pretty much completely gone by June.
     

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