Calling all reading coaches, literacy facilitators, or reading specialists!

Discussion in 'General Education' started by cjven, Apr 18, 2014.

  1. cjven

    cjven Rookie

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    Apr 18, 2014

    I currently teach 7th grade English and recently (2012) graduated with a masters in reading and a K-12 reading specialist endorsement. I have been interested in pursuing this career path, but have been hesitant about missing my own classroom. Also, a majority if the positions posted are for elementary schools and most of my experience as been middle school (my endorsements also include 4-9 ELA, social studies and math). The lowest grade taught was 6th, however, I did have to complete practicums with elementary students to complete my program.

    Here is a typical job description:

    Literacy Facilitator are building level writing and reading experts who serve as a peer coach for classroom instruction. They demonstrate lessons and co-teach, plan with teachers, coordinate the National Writing Project and Reading Fluency training for teachers, provide district Literacy Certification training for teachers, provide para educator training, and participate in all aspects of literacy program development, implementation and evaluation.

    Qualifications
    Department of Education Teacher Certification K-6 Required
    Masters Degree Preferred
    Certified by the district as a Master Literacy Teacher
    Experience and reputation as a master teacher

    Questions:

    1) what is your typical day like? How involved are you with students?

    2) anyone make the switch from middle school to elementary? Do you think my k-12 reading specialist endorsement will fulfill the k-6 certification requirement?

    Thanks for the help!
     
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  3. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Apr 18, 2014

    I am not a reading specialist, but studying to be one. My current class is analyzing how different this position can be from school to school, so I don't really know if there's a typical day.

    I think it depends highly on how much coaching you do versus reading intervention. I know I am far more interested in working with students versus coaching teachers....so that is why I am continuing the program. My school's reading specialist works only with K-2 to intervene with early struggling readers.

    While I agree that 6-12 should ALSO have a Reading person to coach and intervene, this is most often neglected. As long as you understand how to teach fundamental early reading skills, you should be fine. However, maybe volunteering with younger students in a clinic type setting might be helpful. It really is a totally different beast.
     
  4. cjven

    cjven Rookie

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    Apr 19, 2014

    Thank you four square. I know that districts define these positions in different ways that is why I was hoping to hear from people who were in this position. It seems that the day to day expectations are vary a lot.

    Anybody else?
     
  5. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Apr 19, 2014

    I'm not a literacy teacher, but I've worked with her and had enough conversations with her to have a fairly good idea of how her day goes.

    She spends about half her day leading literacy intervention groups, four days a week. The rest of those days tends to vary based on needs. Sometimes she'll go and either observe teachers, co-teach with teachers, or model lessons. Some times she is busy crunching numbers. Other days, she is either out at meetings, meeting with administration, or organizing the book room. On Fridays, she spends all day in team CLT meetings. Tuesday is our Local Screening day; usually about once every two weeks, she is asked to sit in on a local screening meeting of some sort or another.

    One thing I've always heard is that it's always harder to move down to younger grades than to move up to older.
     

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