Call-outs

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by PinkLily, Sep 17, 2007.

  1. PinkLily

    PinkLily Companion

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    Sep 17, 2007

    It's only the third week of school and I'm already losing my patience with some kids. I have a small class, but you'd never guess it because some of them never stop talking. I have 3-4 kids who call out answers constantly. I give lots of positive praise for those who raise their hand, but I can already tell that some of them are going to start calling out their answers too as it's the only way for them to get a turn. I've also tried to ignore those who call out if they spoke when it wasn't their turn, but they just don't seem to care. They continue to shout whatever it is they have to say until somebody acknowledges them. I feel like my students aren't learning anything because we are constantly interrupted and I never get a chance to finish what I am trying to say. I don't know how to get them to stop and I'm afraid that it's only going to get worse as the year goes on. Please help me.
     
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  3. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Sep 17, 2007

    Can you change the way you word questions? Like, instead of asking "What are the order operations?" say "turn to your neighbor and tell him/her the order of operations". This might help those who need to say the answer, because they can say it, but give others a chance to think also. Or, have them write an answer on a sticky note-tell them you will read the first sticky note you get.

    As for just talking out loud, I learned this from a teacher down the hall. She tells the kids how much time she needs to explain/lecture/whatever (never more than 10-15 minutes at a time), then sets a timer. She lets the worst kid hold the timer and tells him when the time is gone she will set it for 1-2 minutes and just let the class talk. She can afford to give up those 1-2 minutes in order to get 15 minutes uninterrupted. It has really worked for her, so I tried it with my worst shouters. Love it! I get "my turn" then I always give them "their turn". It doesn't always work 100% of the time, but in general, it has cut down on the incessant talking.

    kcjo
     
  4. Mrs.Rhinochunks

    Mrs.Rhinochunks Companion

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    Sep 17, 2007

    This sounds severe... but I would prearrange with other teachers to make room in their classroom. Warn students that if they blurt they will be asked to spend some "thinking time" in another room. When students see you enforce it I think the behavioe will diminish and then you also need to follow up with positive reinforcment when those kids do what is expected.
     
  5. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Sep 17, 2007

    I am student teaching 3rd grade, and I can't stand call-outs, either. My solution is that I have a set of popsicle sticks -- one for each student -- on which I have written their names. I pull a stick from the cup in which I keep them, and that person is who I want to answer. If anyone decides to call out (or to become an orangutan ooohh, oohhing), they have to "turn their card." So far it has worked pretty well. I also like it because I get to call on ALL of the students and not just a few.
     
  6. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Sep 17, 2007

    I wasn't sure from your post whether the calling out is in response to your questions, or if it's spontaneous. If it's in response to your questions, try most of the time to call the name of a specific student before asking the question, for example, "Joy, can you tell us what today's date is?" That way, they hopefully won't feel the competition to be the first to answer.

    If it's spontaneous, that could be harder to deal with.
    When a student calls out something relevant, I usually ignore it until I finish my thought, and then, without even turning around, say that I think someone has something to say and I'd like to hear it, but... or something like that. The kid usually remembers to raise his hand by the time I finish saying that, though some have a harder time with it.
    I imagine that wouldn't work as well if it were constant, though.

    If a kid is calling out too much in a short time period (here and there it's an accident, but at a certain point it's a bad habit) then I first give them a warning and if they continue to call out they lose their star for that period.
     
  7. terptoteacher

    terptoteacher Connoisseur

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    Sep 18, 2007

    It's been dubbed "blurt-itis"
     
  8. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Sep 18, 2007

    Is there a known cure?
     
  9. PinkLily

    PinkLily Companion

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    Sep 18, 2007

    Thanks for all the replies. You all have such great ideas and I'm sure I'll be trying them all before the end of the year. Luckily, today was so much better than is has been. I think one of the reasons that it went so much better is because of a new game that I came up with this morning. I have always given lots of verbal praise and I consistently write the names of those who are following the rules and listening well on the board. I call these "bravos". The kids don't get anything, but they love to see their name on the board and they'll usually do anything to get a bravo. Since I was having trouble with some of the kids, I decided to turn this into a game. It's now girls vs. boys. Who is going to have more bravos by the end of the day? The boys really responded to this, which is good since they were the ones who were usually blurting things out (I also have more boys in my class than girls). They tried so hard to get more bravos than the girls. They didn't quite have enough to beat the girls today, but they can try again tomorrow. They asked me this morning what the prize was if they won. I told them there was no prize, only bragging rights. That seemed to be enough for them. Hopefully this will last for awhile.
     
  10. terptoteacher

    terptoteacher Connoisseur

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    Sep 19, 2007

    duct tape???:D:rolleyes:
     
  11. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Sep 20, 2007

    This is probably not something most people would do, but I have decided to teach my kids how to have a "conversation" during our morning meeting. We have been working on listening for a pause in the conversation, and "chiming" in when the opportunity arises. I do have a signal I will use if someone is rambling (I have an ADD child who does this.) But otherwise, it is actually working!! After each child speaks, I usually say something, either in response, or to ask another question. It has worked really well. We have done it when discussing poems, our current events, decision making times, etc.

    They know when it is a time they can use the "chime in" instead of hand-raising when we sit in a circle during out meetings. I made this very clear and we have been practicing. If someone wants to say something, I say, "wait for the pause and chime in." They have not been talking over one another at all. Sometimes two kids want to say something at once, and just like adults, one stops and lets the other speak.

    During instruction I work really hard to ignore the kids who call out. I have a couple but they are getting better.Often when I ask a question during instruction, I tell them to think about it silently so everyone has a chance to figure it out. I do this especially during read alouds, when they all want to make predictions, etc. That seems to work well also.

    I have had this problem in years past, but really work on it hard. I don't do the popcicle stick thing anymore because I want the kids to want to share on their own, and it inhibits good ideas from being shared from those not called on.
     
  12. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Sep 20, 2007

    That is an excellent suggestion. As adults we don't sit there and raise our hand and wait to be called on during a discussion. Teaching kiddos how to discuss properly is a great lesson to learn in school! Thank you for this great idea!!
     

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