Calif. Single Subject vs. Multiple Subject?

Discussion in 'Student & Preservice Teachers' started by jenniferharte, Dec 27, 2007.

  1. jenniferharte

    jenniferharte New Member

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    Dec 27, 2007

    Hello everyone,

    I'm getting ready to go back to school to my teaching credentials, and I'm faced with the choice between going for the single subject vs. the multiple subject credential.

    I would love input from anyone on the pros and cons of each - for those who are going through each program right now, and those who have been teaching elementary or high school. What do you love about your type of credential? What do you hate? Does any one know what there is more demand for (besides the obvious Math/Special Ed credentials)? Any advice?

    As for me, I received my B.A. in Anthropology from U.C. Santa Cruz. I love kids, love teens, so it isn't an easy choice either way!

    Thanks!
     
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  3. MissWull

    MissWull Cohort

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    Dec 27, 2007

    I would say there is more demand for single subject. I'm in a program to get my multiple subject credential and I haven't gotten too far into the search, but from what I hear there are a lot of people wanting positions and not that many openings! This is in the southern california area by the way.
     
  4. DaveF

    DaveF Companion

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    Dec 27, 2007

    My advice to you is to go observe as many different grades and classes as possible. This will give you some idea of the age range that suits you. I would never teach HS. Never, no way, no how.

    If you go multiple subject, you could end up in a K-6 class. There is so much difference between teaching 1st grade and 6th grade.

    If you get a single subject, try to get a math or science add on credential by passing the required CSET test. These people (math and science) usually have no trouble getting a job. My friend even got a $5K signing bonus. There are probably thousands of teachers with social science backgrounds that are looking for jobs.

    Good luck with whatever you choose.
     
  5. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Dec 27, 2007

    For me, the decision is easy. I am working on my single-subject because I want to teach English. I don't want to teach math or science or anything except English. With a multiple-subject credential, I would be teaching everything, and I am not very interested in that. I think a multiple subject is good for those who like young kids and don't want to deal with the attitudes that many of the older kids have. So, I think you have to figure out what you would like teaching, and which age group you enjoy working with the most...
     
  6. uclalum

    uclalum Groupie

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    Dec 27, 2007

    You might have an easier time getting a job if you go for the single-subject. However, I don't know what the job market is like in Santa Cruz. One thing is for sure, if you teach middle or high school you probably will spend much less money on your classroom.
    Good luck. Let us know what you end up doing.:)
     
  7. SingBlueSilver

    SingBlueSilver Companion

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    Dec 27, 2007

    being social with kids/teens is totally different from working with/teaching them...i love playing with little kids, but i hated working with them. as for teens, i could do both - be social and work with/teach them, so now i teach 8th grade u.s. history...i just got my credential in june and the search for a job after was really scary for me. there were really few postings and i applied to any/every district within a 20-25 mile radius of where i live. i got really lucky and someone hired me! other subjects (yes, such as math and science) are highly sought after.
    it seems as though there aren't that many elementary teacher openings in southern california, but i hear in northern california there are quite a few...my friend (from so. cal.) decided to move up north for a job and another friend's boyfriend also moved up north for a teaching job.
     
  8. jenniferharte

    jenniferharte New Member

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    Dec 29, 2007

    Thanks everyone for the great advice so far! i'm currently living in Sacramento, and maybe I should start asking what the job market is like out here - for some reason I was under the assumption and there is a high demand for teachers right now... but from some of these responses, I'm getting a different impression! It's a bit intimidating to think that I might not be able to find a job after getting my credential. I'm starting to lean towards single subject, but since it wouldn't be in Science or Math, I don't think that would help too much job wise. Hmmmm maybe it's time to brush up on my biology... :)
     
  9. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Dec 30, 2007

    Asking about the job market would be a very good move, yes. Start by checking in with your county office of education - and take an unofficial copy of your transcript with you.

    You might want to consider a credential in English with social science as an additional authorization, or vice versa. Oh, and what languages do you speak?
     
  10. Malcolm

    Malcolm Enthusiast

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    Dec 30, 2007

    Sacramento job market is not growing much. Elk Grove district is no growth for the first time in many years. Sacramento City Unified district is losing students. San Juan is losing students. So, most positions will be from teachers leaving because of retirement, etc. Best bet will be single subject credential in high demand subject like math, science, English, Spanish, or special ed. The biggest local district internship program, Project Pipeline, does not even take multiple subject candidates.
     

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