Building Rapport

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Ms. I, Jun 8, 2013.

  1. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    5,882
    Likes Received:
    159

    Jun 8, 2013

    I'll be starting a new job next wk & probably continue for the 2013-14 yr. I'll be working with some HS kids for pretty much the 1st time in my life. I know it's important to relate to them & build rapport quickly, like with any kid really.

    I'll be at a private, special ed school & I'll only be working with 1 or 2 kids at one time for only 30 min. These are not wealthy, privileged kids by any means. I had a chance to observe some of the kids I'll be working with & they seemed pretty nice.

    I want them to really enjoy working with me. But I admit, I'm a bit stiff & serious! I have no idea what HS aged kids like, etc.

    Any tips? Thanks! :)
     
  2.  
  3. elateacher4life

    elateacher4life Cohort

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2011
    Messages:
    687
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 8, 2013

    Just be yourself. Try to find out what the kids like and have conversations about that.
     
  4. Ms.SLS

    Ms.SLS Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2011
    Messages:
    681
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 8, 2013

    Also, be cautious not to become "buddy buddy" with the kids. It's different working with high school because they are more adult like, and if you are friendly to them, they will sometimes see that as an invitation to treat you like an equal. Make sure they understand the difference between you taking an interest in them and being friendly, and you wanting to be their "friend."
     
  5. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Messages:
    4,959
    Likes Received:
    1,149

    Jun 8, 2013

    High school kids, even the really tough ones are very nice one on one. Most of them like the one on one relationship, and they don't have to seem tough and cool in front of their friends. Of course some might not want to open up, or might take longer, but most of them will probably surprise you.
     
  6. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    Messages:
    1,841
    Likes Received:
    51

    Jun 8, 2013

    In such small groups I guess this won't be a problem, but my first concern is always to build respect. They need to know I mean business and that they need to follow the rules. Then we can have a relationship.

    Don't try to force a relationship and don't try to be someone you're not. Be engaging and enthusiastic. Don't expect them to open up and love you in a week, or even a month. It's not as easy as with elementary! The most important part, of course- HAVE FUN!
     
  7. deefreddy

    deefreddy Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    0
  8. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2006
    Messages:
    7,946
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jun 16, 2013

    I think just taking the first two minutes of each meeting asking how they are, if they've done anything fun or interesting lately, and so on is a simple way to build rapport. I'd be cautious about overthinking it. :)
     
  9. HistTchr

    HistTchr Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2011
    Messages:
    883
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jun 16, 2013

    I can't say I do anything specific to build rapport. I just act myself and take an interest in my students' lives. I love the "conversation calendar" idea that Cris Tovani writes about in her books, and have used that with success for the past few years. Here's a website where a teacher explains it: http://pedagogypractice.blogspot.com/2009/10/conversation-calendars.html
     
  10. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    5,882
    Likes Received:
    159

    Jun 19, 2013

    Thanks a lot guys & thanks deefreddy & HistTchr for the links!
     
  11. dave1mo

    dave1mo Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2013
    Messages:
    417
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 24, 2013

    Find what each student is interested in (sports, video games, dance, anime, drawing, etc.) and ask them about it whenever you have a free moment. If a student tells you about a big swim meet this weekend, remember to ask how it went on Monday. If a student brings you pictures of their new puppy, ask how he's settling in at his new home.

    Just take interest; it's difficult with 160 students (180-200 in my case), but once you start it's much easier. I sometimes leave myself notes or send myself e-mails in the evening when I think to ask a student something the next day.
     
  12. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,876
    Likes Received:
    229

    Jun 24, 2013

    I guess I don´t really have any advice but I do want to say congratulations on the job! This sounds much different than what you have been doing the last couple of years.
     
  13. bradleys22

    bradleys22 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2013
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 25, 2013

    I definitely agree. Building EFFORTLESS rapport with your students will take time. It should come out naturally. Just enjoy the experience, be approachable and don't forget to smile!
     
  14. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    14,070
    Likes Received:
    1,886

    Jun 25, 2013

    Be genuine--kids this age will spot it in a second if you aren't.
     
  15. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    5,882
    Likes Received:
    159

    Jun 25, 2013

    Thanks guys & TamiJ for the congrats!

    I just work with them 2 days this week, then they're out for the summer, then Aug 15th is the 1st day of school.
     
  16. TeachOn

    TeachOn Habitué

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    804
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 25, 2013

    Yep, be yourself, insofar as that is consistent with being the teacher.
     
  17. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    5,882
    Likes Received:
    159

    Jun 28, 2013

    Thanks again!
     
  18. Global Teacher

    Global Teacher Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2013

    When I was a new teacher I was told not to let the students see you smile for the first three months. Of course it's an exaggeration, but with high school students, especially for a teacher close to their age, it is important to have mechanisms that allow you to maintain distance.

    In any case, it's good to avoid anything that would lead to the perception of your being a "cool teacher." A cool teacher is more like a peer and less like the adult in charge. As the teacher, you are and will always have to be the adult in charge.
     
  19. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Messages:
    4,959
    Likes Received:
    1,149

    Jun 29, 2013

    Trying to build rapport doesn't mean the teacher is trying to be cool. Building rapport just shows that the teacher cares about the student, wants to get to know him / her. If a student knows you care, he's more likely to do better in most aspects.
     
  20. Global Teacher

    Global Teacher Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2013

    No building rapport does not necessarily mean a teacher is trying to be cool, but it's something to watch out for.

    An easy way to build rapport is to close the distance between yourself and the students and emphasize things that put you on the same level as the students. This is the wrong way for a teacher to build rapport.

    Instead a teacher should, as you say, get to know the students and show he or she cares.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. EvaWillamss
Total: 218 (members: 1, guests: 200, robots: 17)
test