Budget Crisis - all extracurriculars and sports cut

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Ron6103, Mar 17, 2010.

  1. atomic

    atomic Companion

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    Mar 19, 2010

    All of the activities i mention are free in my community...paid for by local churches, fundraisers, etc.

    I came from a very poor family. My parents worked hard to provide for me. I think that's why I appreciated everything I had.

    I see this general attitude a lot. Everyone expects everything.




    [...and I'm a he, not a she...some teachers are male. :) ]
     
  2. futureteach21

    futureteach21 Habitué

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    Mar 19, 2010

    I don't think anyone on here would argue about the importance of extracurriculars. And I don't think that anyone would actually completely support the elimination of these extras. But, desperate times call for desperate measures. People have to pick and choose what is most valuable in a child's education. And for some, that would never be sports and extra's.
     
  3. Grover

    Grover Cohort

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    Mar 19, 2010

    Atomic, I congratulate you on your choice of parents. Unfortunately, many of the kids in my wife's first-grade class have not been so wise. They have selected child-abusers, jail inmates, drug addicts (one was stealing her son's ADHD meds!). I just bought books from the book fair for a couple whose parents didn't have money for a 2 dollar book. (My wife told them they had 'won' them in a non-existant drawing- they were both pathetically happy to have a book of their own). Were their parents that poor or just spending the money on beer and big-screen tvs? I don't know, or much care. While I agree that picking bad parents shows a serious lack of judgement, just how much should these kids be punished for it?
     
  4. atomic

    atomic Companion

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    Mar 19, 2010

    Darwinism...
     
  5. Grover

    Grover Cohort

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    Mar 19, 2010

    I presume you mean we should let them die. Better start working out. So far, angry, ignorant thugs have proven to have a better procreative profile than polite, well-educated libertarians.
     
  6. atomic

    atomic Companion

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    Mar 19, 2010

    No. I mean...let them fight to overcome.

    I don't except excuses.

    There are a lot of students with bad parents that choose to make something of themselves.

    It won't be easy, but it doesn't mean we have to give them sports, clubs, and activities in school.
     
  7. Grover

    Grover Cohort

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    Mar 19, 2010

    Either way, atomic- the way they choose to fight to overcome might not be to your liking unless somebody dishes out some of the benefits of civilization to them. You might just find yourself being overcome in a dark alley somewhere. Or in your classroom, for that matter. I think offering alternatives to gangs and violence is cheap at the price.
     
  8. 3Sons

    3Sons Enthusiast

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    Mar 19, 2010

    This sounds a lot like, "it's their personal responsibility to ensure their education". I suspect atomic wouldn't mind it being characterized that way. And I would refer back to my post on the revised Texas standards on what "personal responsibility" can be code for.
     
  9. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Mar 19, 2010

    I was not from an affluent family growing up. My parents made numerous sacrifices so that I could be involved in many extracurricular activities. For two years of high school, I attended a residential school for academically gifted students. It's a public school. No tuition, only room and board amounting to about $1000 a year. This includes that price of extracurriculars and most dances, etc. So yes, all of my courses were taught at the college level, but the real education I got came from trying a variety of organizations to see where I fit in. I was in math club, a foreign language club, several smaller interest groups, service organizations, and performance groups. Yes, they looked good on my college applications, but i learned from them. I learned how to balance several commitments at once, and how to give back to those less fortunate. I learned that I am not interested in math, but some parts of foreign languages do interest me. I learned how to get along with a diverse group of people. I learned how (and when) to lead, and follow.

    I would love to say "I don't accept excuses," but in my classroom, "I saw my mom get shot last night" is an excuse for not having your homework. "My dad spent all our money at the casinos" is an excuse for not having the novel we are reading. These things are beyond the control of children. Children need parents to take them to activities at churches and community centers. And the kid who says "I haven't been playing soccer since I was five, so I'm not good enough to make any of the club teams" can play on JV and have access to physical activity. Some of those kids have bad parents. If anything we should help those kids who have bad parents.

    Being on a sports team or in a performance group shouldn't be easy. But the work should not come from just trying to get the chance to try.
     
  10. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Mar 19, 2010

    I can see why it is an appealing thought... my mom's district has, more than once, threatened to cut music, sports, etc. if the referrendum, etc. doesn't pass... and it works, because it usualyl passes once tohse parets get involved. Which, of course, benefits EVERYTHING in the school, not just the extracurriculars... or, in some cases, co-curriculars... at my middle, jr. high, and high school, band, orchestra, choir, are were credit classes (as were some drama classes, even though plays were after-school). They were held during the day and we got academic credit for them. Sure, they did things that required out-of-school time also... but they were co-curricular, and count in your GPA just as much as algebra or physics or English.

    For SOME kids, it's those extra activities that keep them in school rather than dropping out. IS that the ideal world? Of course not. But, for more kids than we'd probably like to admit, school just doesn't hold thier interest. Do teachers haev a part in that? Perhaps. Do parents have a part in that? Definately, in many cases. Is it the student's fault? In some cases... but for whatever the reason, there are a large percentage of kids who need those extra activities to keep them focused, motivated, etc...

    I know kids who really struggled through academic classes, but excelled in other areas... music, drama, sports, etc... by offering those as a part of school, they saw more of a buy-in... Without theo pportunities through the school, many of them wouldn't have made it.

    SHOULD kids have an oppoartunity to sing, play instruments, act, do sports outside of school? Absolutely. For a variety of reasons, that isn't possible for everyone in every area.
     
  11. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Mar 19, 2010

    Districts have to make hard choices...a nearby district was 650K in the hole before recent NJ budget cuts and made cuts to extracurricular, secretarial staff and custodial before making any classroom cuts...it has to be about making budget decisions that least impact classroom instruction...I'm not saying I love it, I'm saying that's the reality. My district lost $500K in state money THIS WEEK and has less than a week to adjust the budget for next year...we're all worried about cuts.
     
  12. looneyteachr

    looneyteachr Companion

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    Mar 27, 2010

    people will move out of that district - kids need sports and fine arts to develop as a whole person - and many for college opptys - it's stupid - there are other ways to save $$ - some football programs pay for themselves
     
  13. Muttling

    Muttling Devotee

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    Mar 27, 2010

    This is just the beginning folks. A LOT of our funding comes from the Federal government and we haven't had a balanced budget since 1969 outside of a couple of years during Clinton.


    The days of spending more money than you have are coming to an end. Blame Obama for cutting all you like, but the alternative is to spend money that we don't have to spend and I'm not hearing folks who gripe about cuts explain how we should pay for the spending.

    The days of paying for the last 2 generations' spending stupidity are coming. Social security will get hit HARD which is poetic justice since it was the retirees' generation that spent us into this deep hole and ignored decades of warnings.

    It's just a matter of time. Keep your butts out of debt, don't count on social security for retirement (even though you've paid for it), and you will survive.
     
  14. Toak

    Toak Cohort

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    Mar 27, 2010

    I never had to buy a uniform or instrument. Insurance is the biggest cost factor in having activities, especially when travel is involved (or impact sports that require an ambulance present the entire timelike football)

    The community loved the band - and we were recognized as one of the best in the state. Actually through most of high school, people only came to the football games to watch the band - Hardly a soul would leave the bleachers during half time, though barely anyone was there during the game (the team wasn't any good - I think it was something like a 20 year losing streak). The teachers tried to run the band into the ground though - not allowing elementary kids to leave for band practice, requiring high schoolers to come to their rooms during band for make-up work etc

    I suffered for scholarships in high school because the way my school set up activities - you couldn't take advanced chemistry if you took advance chemistry. You couldn't take either if you took calculus (only offered senior year). Nor could you take computer science 2 if you took any of the previously mentioned ones. Had to pad my schedule with fake classes that obviously looked fake - ie "marriage and family" for no other reason than my school wouldn't allow us to have a full academic schedule. If a class could only be offered during one period, they would schedule it at the same time as all of the other classes that could only be offered one period. in a school with an average of 80 kids per grade, that was every advanced class there was
     
  15. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    Apr 2, 2010

    I live in a community that doesn't have drama, sports, or other organizations that are available to my children in the area outside of school. Yes, there is summer league softball and baseball and ELEMENTARY football, soccer, and basketball. We don't have any school sponsored elementary teams. My son plays football and does powerlifting. The powerlifting team is being cancelled next year. Yes, I will be taking him to the meets on my own, and I will take the course as a school official so that I can sponsor other kids. But my main concern in groups like FFA, FCCLA, DECA, and BETA. My son will go to college on a FFA scholarship. He is a leader in his school because of this organization. He has made friends all over the US because of activities that this organization hosts. What happens when our school decides that they can't allow this students to go on trips or competitions? I agree with Jen (I think it was her) that the absence of these organizations will hurt scholarships and admissions into college. I truly believe that when we remove all of these clubs, groups, organizations, teams, ---what ever you want to call it--- we will lose students.
     
  16. JackTrader

    JackTrader Comrade

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    Apr 2, 2010

    If you're referring to education funding, the lion's share of public education finances come from the states, not the Federal government. The Feds will pay for SOME programs such as special ed but it doesn't account for very much of it and they've never paid in the amount of funds that they've promised, e.g. for NCLB.
     
  17. freetofly

    freetofly Rookie

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    Apr 2, 2010

    I think that in a financial crisis, no matter what the extracurricular will be shrunk. By definition alone it is EXTRAcurricular. Same with sports. I do think that they are important, but not more so than Math or English. Maybe a possible alternative can be to not cut these programs but find ways to make them less expensive, e.g. Having the kids play sports that do not require much equipment! There must be common ground.
     
  18. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Apr 2, 2010

    My district just lost additional state funding for this year and all state funding for next year. Our budget has been slashed drastically. We've already learned several teachers have been non-renewed for next year with more possible cuts pending the budget. These are tough sad times.
     
  19. Toak

    Toak Cohort

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    The school board cancelled all field trips my senior year (except senior trip). It had nothing to do with funding either. They said they cancelled them in order to do a study to see how many days of school students were missing due to field trips. They even cancelled a European trip that down payments had already been made for.

    The school board was crazy that year. My senior class went from 88 students to 70 due to ridiculous requirements that made it so many knew in October they had no chance of graduating. One girl had missed days due to being pregnant and they told her she would only be allowed to graduate if she dropped out of school for three months and then came back - if she didn't drop out, and came to school during those three months, she wouldn't be allowed to pass the 12th grade. My neighbor quit school because he missed 12 days under doctor's orders for having mono. But he came to school during one of those days because he felt better. The doctor found out about it, told him he was still contagious and made him stay home. The school said that since he came to school that day, his doctor's excuse was not valid for any of the days, and so he missed too many days to be allowed to graduate. (this was November). As can be expected, he too dropped out. Because why would he stay in school for a year when there was no benefit to doing so
     

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