Brand new teacher/Lesson planning

Discussion in 'General Education' started by ashleydb, Jul 8, 2016.

  1. ashleydb

    ashleydb Guest

    Jul 8, 2016

    Hi Everyone! I'm a BRAND new teacher and will have my first class in September. I want to get a head start and start planning lessons for the first week etc. However, I have no clue where to start or what I SHOULD be teaching. I wasn't sure if someone from my "team" was going to reach out to me so we could plan our curriculum or if I should just know this information? I feel like I have literally no idea what is going on LOL. I just got the job last week so maybe I'm being too proactive?

    Thank you!
     
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  3. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Jul 8, 2016

    ,
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2019
  4. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Jul 8, 2016

    If you don't have contact information for your team, email your principal and ask for it. Your district most likely has a pacing guide for you to follow. In the meantime, you can start collecting activities that match your state standards.
     
  5. Srhhwtt

    Srhhwtt Rookie

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    Jul 8, 2016

    I am a new teacher too, so I may not have the best advice. My mentor teacher has already contacted me..I would ask the principal who your mentor will be or the team leader. You can most likely get their contact information from the campus website. My mentor teacher is helping me prepare. So far we have talked about things I may need to purchase for the classroom, what their daily schedule may look like, their current reading and math strategies and trends, and what technology I will need to be familiar with. I have collected my grade level standards and occasionally review them. Before school starts you should be able to meet with the team and work on planning. This is when I will begin planning (they do their planning as a team), but in the mean time I have additionally looked into classroom management techniques and ice breaker activities for the first week of school.

    Also, don't forget to enjoy your summer break before the craziness starts! ;)


    I
     
  6. talknteach

    talknteach Rookie

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    Jul 8, 2016

    I agree that you should map out your first day, or preferably your first few days. Over plan!!! You do not want to run out of plans the first few days. Keep them busy! Do getting- to- know- you activities, teaching procedures, practicing procedures- how do we take a bathroom break? Make a chart, then try it. Then revisit the chart-how did it go? Set guidelines with class input, etc. Have them move a lot (come to the rug for a mini lesson, back to desks for 15 minutes, stand up to share out, back to rug, etc.). I always do a writing activity within the first 2 days to get a feel for their writing ability.

    I also bring home the teacher editions. Math may be the easiest to plan. Find out if your team follows the text in order or skips around ( teaching from unit 1 to unit 5 back to unit 3, for example). Then plan the first week or two. If you don't start math right away, you can just use the plans when you do start.

    Have fun!
     
  7. tamanna sultana

    tamanna sultana Rookie

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    Jul 9, 2016

    I agree with you. You have given an effective way to start a class.
     
  8. teacherquestions

    teacherquestions Rookie

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    Jul 9, 2016

    I had my first year of teaching last year and thought about doing the same thing as you--being way too proactive haha--but my advice is to wait until the 2 weeks or so of PD you have with your team befeore school starts. Youll have plenty of time then and youll have a better clue of the curriculum and what you should be teaching. Alot of what i "plan" during the summer gets wasted because so much changes.
     
  9. kaitydid

    kaitydid Rookie

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    Jul 10, 2016

    I just finished my first year of teaching. I don't know what grade/subject you'll be teaching, but hopefully this will be helpful!

    I would reach out to someone on your team (ask your principal for the contact info if you don't have it) and ask them about the curriculum. No one from my team (I taught 8th grade ELA) reached out to me, so I took charge and emailed them my questions. It was really helpful because I found out I wasn't required to stick with a textbook and could pretty much use whatever reading material I wanted as long as it was appropriate and followed the standards! I also found out that my team didn't do the same lesson plans while other teams always did lesson plans together, so I was pretty much on my own (although my teammates were more than happy to give me story suggestions and lesson plan ideas when I was stuck). Knowing what your team does will really help you prepare yourself for your expectations instead of going in blind--and will save you time and energy from doing your lesson plans the wrong way!

    Definitely take a look at the standards so that way you have some awareness of what you should be teaching and how you want to teach those skills. Find out if there is a pacing guide your district expects you to follow. See if there's a particular format or layout you have to use when writing your lesson plans and if/when they should be submitted. Ask about any teacher editions that you can take home and look at so that you can start brainstorming. As for the first week of school, I focused on get-to-know-you activities and classroom procedures. It helped me and my students feel comfortable around each other, and as a fellow teacher told me, students can't know to do/not to do something (let alone learn!) if they don't know what is expected of them. Taking time to establish (and practice!) your procedures will save you a lot of headache and heartache throughout the year (trust me!), too. It also might be helpful to plan some pre-assessment activities so that you can gauge where your students' skill levels are at.

    Truthfully, all year long I didn't plan much more than a week in advance. I was too overwhelmed to try to create big units, so taking it one week at a time helped my first-year-teacher stress level. Now that I'm through my first year, I know which lesson plans are worth keeping and which ones should be tossed, and I can focus on expanding and improving the "mini" units I really enjoyed doing.

    (Oops! I wrote more than I wanted, so I hope I didn't overwhelm you!)
     

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