Bothered by bullies in hs while working as a substitute teacher...

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by Rememb23, Apr 30, 2017.

  1. Rememb23

    Rememb23 Rookie

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    Apr 30, 2017

    How would one handle some angry, male who says nasty things to you when you sub? This is some 17 yr old hs student accusing me of not being smart in the nastiest way because I was just giving assignments out in geometry & not teaching.( You can sub in this state if you just have a college degree and do not have a teaching certificate/degree).
    I basically left my math education in HS (I struggled with math but eventually did ok; ; I'm assuming this kid is not getting it at all,)
    I pursued more of the humanties (and some science)and basically forgot all my math..
    I think this student is projecting his weakness onto me and it really annoyed me. He's a big cheater too/cheats on assignments. Sorry,but he's s jerk.
    If I ever get offered that very same school I tend to avoid it because that one student. He kind of scares me- he is very big physically and very nasty, with a little bit of an undertone of violence.
    I'm really just using the substitute teaching as a backup in my life economically. Now this may not be a very virtuous thing to do but I do like some of the classes; some of the students and subjects. I do have a hard time with bullies whether the bullies are from ghetto schools or from richer areas. They're all the same.
    Actually, I need to stop this kind of job because it's not for me.
    I'm just curious if anyone has any insight into this sort of encounter?
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2017
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Apr 30, 2017

    How is this relevant?
     
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  4. Rememb23

    Rememb23 Rookie

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    Well, perhaps I was stressing culture. Maybe saying "white" isn't a good way to express it.
     
  5. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Yeah, that isn't a good way to express it. Race doesn't really matter at all in this situation, same with the fact that he is learning disabled.

    Have you left a note for the teacher you are subbing for? If he cheats on assignments - maybe find out the school policy for that and follow through with it?
     
  6. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    This.
     
  7. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    I'm assuming another teacher told you he was SLD (a student with a specific learning disability). Definitively, a learning disability is less of a disability and more of a difference in ability. I doubt if in a temporary situation this difference would play a role in his adverse behavior. Personally, in such a situation, I would explain my procedures just as you explained them on this forum; the students will understand your honesty. A possible way to assist the student during class is to allow for some student assistance or use an acceptable website or program for tutoring. A nearby teacher might be able to assist, also. Concerning cheating, if a student is afraid, s/he might rectify the situation by cheating. I would not put up with any misuse of language against the teacher (or any other person, for that matter) during class, but I would listen when a student speaks as respectfully as I always speak to him/her. I don't mean to be too critical, because yes, unfortunately, some kids (and adults) do experiment or eventually become trapped in antisocial behavior, but labeling kids or stereotyping kids is antithetical to a solution; the last time I checked, we are all people.

    I subbed prior to my teaching career. One day I was placed in a junior high sewing class. OK, yes, in college I learned (kind of) to sew on buttons (well, kinda-sorta). The teacher left no lesson plans, so I simply told the kids I knew absolutely nothing about sewing and asked if they were working on any current projects. They knew what was on the schedule for that day and went right to work. One boy even finished his project--then realized that he had sewed the whole thing backwards; (as I understand it, he was to sew backwards then turn it inside out, but he sewed it forwards, which resulted in it being backwards--something like that). The next door home economics teacher came to my rescue with some mimeographed puzzles (this was before the dawn of photocopiers and printers) for the kids to work on when they finished their projects .
     
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  8. Rememb23

    Rememb23 Rookie

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    I don't know if he has a learning disability. I don't know if he has any kind of diagnosis. He's a poor student and furthermore he is a bully both to students t as well as,I sure adults.
    This is an anonymous forum,so to speak but I edited the offensive words out.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2017
  9. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    You called him "learning-disabled" in the first line of your post.
     
  10. Rememb23

    Rememb23 Rookie

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    There have been teachers that gave me access to the students taking drugs for attention issues; some of them are amazing students.
     
  11. Rememb23

    Rememb23 Rookie

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    I'm not a psychologist.
    (You're really dissecting my words and you're entitled to..)
    I was merely venting.
    (there are sometimes students that are not learning in certain school environments) there's some math .
    teachers that can teach anyone.
    I think I should edit of delete this post because I really came here to find out how to deal with bullies.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2017
  12. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Words are what we use here on message boards like this. If you don't want the words you used to be read, then you should have used different words. You're using terms like "learning-disabled" as insults rather than actual descriptors, which is weird and not helpful to the situation. You could have left out a lot of the extraneous commentary ("very white"?) and still gotten good advice about how to deal with mean and rude students.
     
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  13. Rememb23

    Rememb23 Rookie

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    That's true. It was a mistake. I'm new to this site.
     
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  14. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    I think you seem to own the fact that math is not your strong point and because you feel his accusations are somewhat truthful it seems like it's affecting you more. You have a few options at this point:

    1. Learn the content well enough to be able to not let the students' words get under your skin, because you'll know otherwise. Just hold him accountable for his actions (if he's disrupting, send him out).

    2. Agree with him, that math is not your strong suit. Tell him that he's going to come across a lot of different people with different strengths and weaknesses that may be in a position of leadership above him, and regardless of that fact, he is required to treat you with respect. You are a sub and thus need to rely on the teachers' plans in order to give them instruction. Invite him to learn together with you so you can both get stronger in this subject. If this doesn't work, continue holding him accountable for his actions just like in no. 1.
     
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  15. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    A helpful hint about attention medications; ADD and ADHD do not necessarily mean misbehavior. All kids misbehave, but sometimes the misbehavior of ADHD students is different; I don't know about high school, but often ADHD kids are not as good at getting away with stuff as other kids due to their spontaneity. A common misunderstanding is that the medication is a sedative. It's not; it's a stimulant similar to coffee. In fact, caffeine also "calms" down a person with ADHD, but not as effectively for two reasons. Younger children retain caffeine in their bodies longer than adults and caffeine stimulates more parts of the brain than ADHD medicine such as Ritalin. (I thought some of this information might be helpful).

    Subbing can be tricky in managing behavior. I'm more familiar with elementary, but some similarities still exist in all classrooms. The key is to focus on expectations for the entire class. When you enter a class, the classroom and school have rules and they will be followed. This is kind of an automatic expectation, especially with more mature kids in high school. In other words, you approach this as any other social situation; you and the students are there to cooperate in fulfilling their job for the day. Personally, I'd greet the class with a friendly smile as I introduce myself and the lesson. It's so important not to single out a potential troublemaker prior to the occurrence; and previous troublemakers will surprise you at times and be the best behaved. I prefer to never raise my voice at a student; this causes the student to react within his/her lower brain rather than redirecting his/her behavior through the upper brain. Now I'm going to go back on what I just said somewhat; sometimes it is helpful to quietly and politely request a student to avoid certain consistent behaviors prior to the lesson. That comes with practice; you'll get a feel for which plan of action is best. Misbehavior results in either a request to change the behavior, and such requests are best given in a way to keep the student from losing face or feeling like s/he needs to keep up a certain reputation, or a prescribed penalty--often in subbing the best penalty is a note to the teacher or the principal. Whatever you do, it's helpful not to overly warn students, such as saying, "(First time) I mean it. (Second time) I really mean it. (Third time) Do you want to go to the office." Sometimes the best communication for misbehavior is to just quietly look at a student, perhaps shake your head no, or quietly move near to where the student is seated and then keep teaching. In talking individually with a student, a "whenever" message is helpful; "Whenever you throw your book on the floor, it disrupts the lesson that we need to accomplish." Just a few tips I hope might be helpful--but basically like I said, there is no magic formula. This isn't Hogwarts. What really happens is that with time you'll get a knack for resolving interruptions and continuing the lesson.
     
  16. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Maven

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    I understand that you're venting. Did you report this behavior? I think I would have contacted someone right away and maybe have him removed from the class (if that's the type of thing that's done in this school). Some kids are bullies whether they get good grades or not. I wouldn't take it personally. Some kids are just jerks. Period.
    If you had no other problems besides this then maybe you can just find another school to sub in.
     
  17. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

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    A lot of dealing with misbehavior has to do with examining your own mindset. If you walk into a classroom thinking "these kids are 'ghetto'" or "these kids are rich/spoiled" or "these kids are disabled" or whatever, usually, it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. You have to have an open mind and be willing to see the best in every child, even when it's hard to find. Kids are so incredibly intuitive and can tell when you don't like them. There was actually a great article about this exact issue on the Smart Classroom Management website.

    At the end of the day, though, since you see yourself as "just a sub," you might just shrug it off. I would caution, though, about doing any work that puts you into contact with young people if you don't or won't care enough to try to change your mindset.
     
  18. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    I haven't dealt with anything like that before as a sub. I would just say "Hmm...that's rude" and move on. Don't let the kid know it has gotten to you. If the kid continues, then you could say "That's unacceptable. Right now you need to work on the assignment. Can you do it in class or do you need to go to the office?"

    I would also ask other teachers for advice or let the office know what happened.
     
  19. PetrMishikoff

    PetrMishikoff Rookie

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    I am a sub..
    sorry, you just have to roll with it. students act out for a variety of reasons,

    1. you are not the teacher they see all the time - different environment provoke difference responses
    2. they are trying to establish alpha among their friends
    3. they are having a bad day
    4. they may have other issues

    I usually leave a quick update for the teacher next day, or chat quickly with the admin on the way out and give them a verbal update.

    escalation is only necessary if you can't control the classroom. usually situation like this can be quickly deescalated with a smile. Tai chi with these kids are the way to go.
     
  20. Guitart

    Guitart Companion

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    May 10, 2017

    When I subbed at jr/sr highs, I always had security. The red carpet was rolled out for subs. We were referred to as guest teachers. After classroom management attempts failed, I would pick up the phone and say, "Please send someone to remove Spike from the classroom. He is disrupting the fair education of my other students. I would prefer to not see him for the rest of the day."

    A guy with a walkie-talkie would show up, Spike was escorted out. Never to be seen from me that day. That was the courtesy extended to subs. If you have a choice, sub at a school that has a system in place to support you. You are a guest in their building.

    BTW - never had a student named Spike:)
     

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