Blurting and calling out in 4th grade

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by AlexaD, Sep 3, 2013.

  1. AlexaD

    AlexaD Companion

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    Sep 3, 2013

    Has anyone had a fourth grade class that came to you with a bunch of children that frequently called/blurted out in the beginning of the year? What did you do to get success with them raising their hand? From the first day last week, I started working with my students on raising their hands by modeling putting my hand up, or saying sternly, "Raise your hand if you want me to call on you", etc., or ignoring them, and/or giving out consequences, but I'm not pleased that this is happening with fourth graders...I am a first year teacher and would like to curb this ASAP! My consequences are move to yellow (warning), to blue (reflection and loss of 10 minutes of recess), and red (parent call home). I reward the good ones with tickets and frequently call out the ones doing well. Any other techniques to use?
     
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  3. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    This is totally normal, especially at the first of the year when they are so excited. The most natural and effective consequences are that you give the attention to those raising their hands. The ones who blurt out - don't comment, don't remind, don't turn colors, don't call home. No attention, not a speck, for this unwanted behavior.

    You could at the beginning of the day or whenever you gather as a group ask them to tell you the rules of the classroom.
     
  4. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    I agree, it's completely normal. I work hard on ignoring the blurt outs. If they manage to remember to raise their hands I praise them. It's frustrating, but they do learn.
     
  5. Matt633

    Matt633 Comrade

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    Oh my! I have been teaching for years (27) and my class is unbelievable. Not so much with blurting but talking! If I pause for a second to breath, grab a set of papers etc. They go crazy! Sorry didn't mean to hijack, just frustrated!
     
  6. Pencil Monkey

    Pencil Monkey Devotee

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    You could also use the popsicle sticks to curb the blurting. Put a name on each stick and put them in a cup. Show them to the class and explain that you will be choosing folks randomly from the cup of sticks to be called on. You can make some silly name for it too. I call it the glory cup or the cup of doom depending on what I'm working on. This way you can make sure everyone gets a turn. ;)
     
  7. ktdclark

    ktdclark Comrade

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    I do the same as the above poster....no hand raising necessary, kids! Except I write their names on a deck of cards and just pick a card when i am looking for "answers"...
     
  8. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    ^^^This.

    I would also try front loading the expectations right before asking the question. It sounds odd, but I often say who can raise their hand and tell me how we participate when I ask a question.
     
  9. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    This is what I do: preface questions carefully:

    "Raise your hand if you can tell me/answer/give an idea/etc...."
     
  10. Pisces_Fish

    Pisces_Fish Fanatic

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    I do the same thing as Ted, "Raised hands...who can tell me...oooh, I see Susie and Billy with raised hands waiting to be called on..."
     
  11. AlexaD

    AlexaD Companion

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    Thanks for all the good suggestions! I ignored a bunch today and it worked and I also did the Popsicle sticks and that made things run smoothly for a time too. Some of them seem to be catching on, I hope more progress will continue to be made in the weeks to come!
     
  12. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    Just what everyone else says, ONLY call on those who raise their hands. I also usually will give the instruction "raise your hand if you can give me the answer to number 5" instead of "what's the answer to #5?"

    I currently have a huge issue with my 5th graders yelling out questions (or raising their hand and yelling TEACHER!!! TEACHER!!!) and just wandering around the classroom. I have been consistently only addressing them if they are in their seat, quiet, and with a hand raised. It's taken a good month or two but there are only very few occasions now when they don't follow procedure. Be consistent! Best wishes :)
     
  13. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Sep 4, 2013

    For an extreme case last year (this was third grade maybe a lil babyish for 4th but you could modify it) I modified the "blurt chart" you may have seen on pinerest. Basically on pinterest it's each kids name or number with 3 little smiley faces or whatever and I guess they lose one everytime they blurt out. For my one lil "Bobby" who couldn't control himself I gave him 12 little plastic bracelets. Every time he called out I just put my hand out and he knew he had to give up a bracelet. It was quiet and discreet and he immediately realized what he done. It was great because he had the constant reminder on HIM when he was on the rug. He'd sit and pull on them with one hand as if just touching them was a reminder that he couldn't blurt out. They were tied with a little reward system if he had bracelets left at the end of the day. Gradually I reduced the # of bracelets I gave him and when we finally had a day where he didn't blurt out for the whole day it was a huge deal- a day I never thought I'd see because his blurting out seemed sooo uncontrollable.
     
  14. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Sep 4, 2013

    This is excellent advice, and it helped me in teaching 3rd, 4th, and 5th grades.

    I also suggest using classdojo.com. Mine earn classdojo points when they have had a good day in raising their hands.

    These 2 combined help a lot.
     

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