Blue collar?

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by newbie87, Apr 16, 2010.

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  1. newbie87

    newbie87 Comrade

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    I was reading something and it semi talked about education. It was about white collar jobs and blue collar jobs. It basically said teaching is, or is seen as, a blue collar job. Do you think teaching is a blue collared job? Why or why not?
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I have a Master's Degree. My job deals with education and higher order thinking.

    My kids and their parents refer to me as "Mrs. A..."

    I wear a suit and stockings on a regular basis.

    There's nothing wrong with Blue Collar work-- my brother has happily done it for 30 years.

    But I happen to have a White Collar job.
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    By definition:
    The term white-collar worker refers to a salaried professional or an educated worker who performs semi-professional office, administrative, and sales coordination tasks, as opposed to a blue-collar worker, whose job requires manual labor.

    As professional educators, some of our job entails some 'hands on' kinds of work and many of us belong to unions or associations but that does not make our profession 'blue collar'. I'm a 'white collar' professional educator.
     
  5. Emily Bronte

    Emily Bronte Groupie

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    I am also a white collar teaching professional. A lot of people do see education as something along the lines of highly skilled trade. I am just not one of them.
     
  6. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    I consider myself neither blue collar nor white collar. I think I consider myself "rainbow collar" because as educators, there isn't much we don't do/haven't done! We're jacks of all trades!
     
  7. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    My brother works a "blue collared job" and makes over $100,00 a year.
    I work a "white collared job" and make nearly half that.....:0(
     
  8. newbie87

    newbie87 Comrade

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    :thumb: I like this answer.
     
  9. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    I never really understood why we feel the need to distinguish between blue and white collar jobs...
     
  10. greengables

    greengables Rookie

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    I heard a definition a long time ago: if you shower BEFORE you go to work you have a white collar job; if you shower AFTER you get home from work you have a blue collar job! ;)
     
  11. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Something about this irks me slightly...

    I feel that some but certainly not all people use these classifications to distinguish them from a lower class, when these "collars" don't necessarily correlate with education, salary, and social status. And I'm always left wondering about an array of occupations...they seem neither blue nor white, which leads me to think that positions labeled as blue are lowly, those labeled white are honorable, and those without a title are average or acceptable. Thumbs down to that.
     
  12. msmullenjr

    msmullenjr Devotee

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    Apr 17, 2010

    well said
     
  13. Muttling

    Muttling Devotee

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    Blue Collar/White Collar is pretty outdated IMO. There are very few jobs that don't require an advanced level of education these days.
     
  14. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    Sorry but I do disagree to that. Think about all the McDonald's and gas station and restaurant jobs........

    I don't get wrap up in the whole blue vs white collar - I kind of considered myself in between. However, you better bet I am NOT the equivalent of a gas station attendant. And, if you considered yourself on par then you are not putting enough into teaching.....

    There are times I would love to come home from work and not think about anything about work - but that just doesn't happen.
    In college I waited tables and NEVER had to plan for tomorrow's service.
     
  15. maya5250

    maya5250 Comrade

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    :2up: :D I agree with what JustMe said. Better stated than what I was trying to string together.
     
  16. msmullenjr

    msmullenjr Devotee

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    I'm sorry but I find this statement rude. I get the point, but...
     
  17. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Not equivalent how?

    Are the jobs themselves equivalent in the way of tasks and assignments? No. But you said you are not equivalent to a gas station attendant, which makes my heart hurt a little.
     
  18. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    I shower both times!:eek:
     
  19. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    your right - I misspoke on that point. I do not consider myself better, but my job and what I do is not the equivalent. You may differ in opinion. But that is why we all have one. No I do not believe working at a gas station or McD's is as important as being a teacher - PERIOD. I will not apologize for that opinion. I do not want my children to aspire to be a gas station clerk or to work at McD's (as adults that is). SORRY.

    We do not educate kids so they can grow up and do these jobs. People do these jobs because they did not get an education.
    Yes there are people who make more than me with less education. As I responded earlier, my brother has no education and makes great money. But that is not the norm.

    I will never apologize for wanting my children to go to college and get an education so that they are more in control of the job they get.
     
  20. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    You are a baby blue collared worker then...
     
  21. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    I have a different outlook. Perhaps because I teach children who will, in all likelihood, never achieve the status of a "white collar job", and will be highly successful if they are able to learn to be a gas station attendant or a McDonald's employee, I don't differentiate between classes of jobs. Any job is a worthwhile endeavor and the person successfully working at that job and feeling a sense of satisfaction is worthy of our respect, regardless of the label.
     
  22. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    And my earlier post explains why I respectfully disagree with this opinion.
     
  23. TiffanyL

    TiffanyL Cohort

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    I agree, Swansong. I encourage our students to develop a strong work ethic period.

    If you are working and supporting your family, you should be valued and respected for that.
     
  24. msmullenjr

    msmullenjr Devotee

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    :agreed:
     
  25. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    it's all about expectations......... and to encourage a child to dream for a job that will not even pay enough to support a family should be a crime. This attitude of mediocrity is why our public schools are in such disarray. We have teachers that think this mediocrity is ok.

    I know my school district expects that our students will go on to college, trade school, - some sort of higher learning. I work in a title school of about 90% low ses. We just do not have such low expectations for our students.

    I agree teaching work ethic is great no matter the job. I worked at McD's at 16 and a gas station at 18 and I waited table in my early 20s (with 3 kids). I made the choice that I did not want to scrape by all the time so I chose to make a difference. I went to school and I changed my life and the lives of my children.

    I think any job is commendable, but not necessarily equivalent. I just do not want my kids to choose that path. Now if you would like your children to take those jobs, by all means.....
     
  26. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    :thumb: Excellent post, swansong!!! :thumb:
     
  27. msmullenjr

    msmullenjr Devotee

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    jeanniemleigh, I completely agree that we all need to have high expectations for our children and our students. All of the higher level education/jobs that I want for my own children, I want for my students as well. I hope that they all shoot for the moon.
     
  28. TiffanyL

    TiffanyL Cohort

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  29. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    I love my students and I want them to find happiness. Hopefully their travels toward this happiness will be enjoyable and memorable and will ultimately lead them to a good, safe, and successful place. Where that place is will differ greatly among my students. I cannot know their hearts as they do, and if they are happy then I am filled with joy. I also cannot define what success means to them. Will it fall in line with someone else's expectations to earn a certain degree? A certain income? And for my mother who was just a lowly baby-maker, whose glory days have passed her by—what of her? My father, who is a dairy farmer, provided me an awesome childhood despite not having higher education (but whose intelligence and skills leave me awe) and despite earning so little it makes me feel guilty. My young childhood was the stuff dreams are made of…or at least my dreams. To know that people would be ashamed for their children to be in his position makes me sad for those people, as they don’t know one of the the purest forms of happiness that comes from be being a caretaker of land, a position I hold in very high regard.

    Although I don't want to be too specific because this conversation is bigger than this, it's too bad some people--and not only jeanniemleigh--don't seem to recognize the opportunities available at McDonald's and many other establishments that are beneath them and their children. Let us not forget that being employed as a gas station attendant or a McDonald’s food service person doesn’t necessarily translate into lacking an education. I won’t bother providing the various scenarios to support this.

    I think the ego plays a significant role in some of our attitudes towards the choices we and others make. I’m certainly guilty of it as well, and trust me…I feel guilty when I recognize this in myself.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2010
  30. indigo-angel

    indigo-angel Companion

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    I absolutely agree with you. I think that there is this notion that if we expect all students to go to college, they all will, and there will be no one to work the lower paying jobs. I disagree with that because if everyone is going to college, everyone will need a job until they finish; meaning someone may have to pump gas or wait tables, etc. However, these same people may not intend to continue doing these jobs forever, which is not a bad idea. Many people will choose to not pursue their education, and I believe that it should be their choice to make, the choice shouldn't be made for them.
     
  31. Grover

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    Absolutely. Mothers, don't let your children grow up to be teachers.
     
  32. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Funny! :)
     
  33. TiffanyL

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    That's a good point, Grover.

    Also, I think there may be two different conversations taking place here. I don't particularly remember anyone stating that children should be "encouraged" to take low-paying jobs. That is a completely different conversation than promoting acceptance and understanding of the different approaches to family-life, raising children, and lifelong goals.

    While I believe in going to college and I certainly encourage students to become all they can, I do not believe that my way of life is the only acceptable way and that all others should seek to follow my example. Other families may view my lifestyle as "too career oriented", rather than "family-first". I make my family a priority but it is true that I have to find balance between work and family.

    There is no perfect way. Who am I to say that my lifestyle is the only choice?
     
  34. indigo-angel

    indigo-angel Companion

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    I understand where you are coming from completely. What I think some of the posters are saying is that they don't want to teach their students to aspire to something that will not allow them to live a quality life.
     
  35. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    But I don't want someone else deciding what it means for me to have a quality life.
     
  36. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    I have had students that struggled in school. I worried about them. But luckily for them and for my community, my husband can put a welding torch in their hand and get art (or some wonderful work) out of them. I have seen kids that have a D average take his class for two or three years, graduate and begin working immediately and contributing to society with a torch in their hands. Here in Oklahoma a welder that is good can earn up to $30 an hour. Is he or she blue collar? Yes, do they make more than me? Hell, yes. Do they succeed at their job? Yes. I think that belief that every child needs college is wrong. Do I want my children to go to college? Yes, but I will love them no matter what. When my son was in 1st grade he wanted to be a trashman. He thought that their trucks were cool the way that they lifted the cans into the back. If he wants to be a trashman, great...just be the best trashman in the world. That is my dream for my own child and the children I teach.
     
  37. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    I was on board with you until you said you wanted him to be the best trashcan in the world... I think that's taking things a little too far :lol:
     
  38. indigo-angel

    indigo-angel Companion

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    Good point. I think it's safe to presume that we should all be able to afford rent in the area we live, afford the health insurance deductible if it is provided at your place of employment, have sick and personal days, and be able to pay bills, buy goods, and still have something to save. It is terribly hard living anywhere near the minimum wage and with a family, especially in a big city. I wouldn't wish that on anyone.
     
  39. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    you know what I meant...pick a career and be the best at it you can! And Love what you do! That is all we can hope for our children.
     
  40. TiffanyL

    TiffanyL Cohort

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    Ha ha....that is hilarious! I knew what she meant, though, but still very funny! :lol:
     
  41. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    Of course I know what you meant mrachelle... I was merely pointing out a humourous typo :)
     
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