Blame the teacher

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Cobalt_Waves, Sep 25, 2013.

  1. Cobalt_Waves

    Cobalt_Waves Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2012
    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 25, 2013

    What do you do when an embattled student decides to blame you for their behavioural issues? I referred a student to the admin yesterday for the first time in 2 years and now he is blaming me, saying that I am singling him out (not true!). He needs to own up and take responsibility for his own actions. His lack of effort has translated to a 1% average in my class. He is disruptive and rude, and even mocked me on one occasion. I have no patience for any efforts on his part to pin this on me. I am all too willing to provide him with support, but he must own up and change his ways.

    Help!
     
  2.  
  3. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Messages:
    4,961
    Likes Received:
    1,155

    Sep 25, 2013

    That's a common excuse for a student to say that you're singling him out. All you have to do is have sufficient documentation for his behavior. Even if you were to single him out, all he should be concerned about that his behavior earned him the consequences. You do not have to explain anything to him, just let him know how, when and how many times he broke the rules.
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Sep 26, 2013

    You need to come up with a list of concrete behaviors that would help improve his grades.

    For example:
    - Is he prepared for class, or does he miss the first few minutes going back to his locker for his notebook or scrounging for a pen?

    - Is he attentive in class? Does he typically get all the notes?

    - Does he ask questions?

    - Does he attend extra help?

    - How's his homework? Regularly done? Complete? Legible?

    - How are his quiz grades? Does the material on the quiz translate directly to what's on the test? (So, having failed a quiz, would he have an indication that he's unprepared for a test on the same topic?

    Forget administration, go to the parents. And not about his behavior per se, but about his grades and all the things he could-- and should-- be doing to help improve them.

    Discipline-- the mocking and disruptions-- are a different matter. But get mom and dad on board on all the things he could be doing to improve that average.

    And know that, as much as it's not right, it's pretty typical of teens to look to blame someone else-- anyone else-- for their own failure to work. Don't take it to heart.
     
  5. marrkede

    marrkede Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2013
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 26, 2013

    I simply want to say that it is very unethical to blame teachers.It badly hurts there professional interest.Anyhow thanks for sharing this very important social issue.
     
  6. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    Messages:
    8,679
    Likes Received:
    1,741

    Sep 26, 2013

    Alice, as always, covers your bases beautifully. The main thing I can add is to remember to avoid taking it personally. In his mind, it's the only defense. All that documentation as well as your suggestions will easily refute it. Also, I doubt anyone in your administration actually believes him.
     
  7. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2013
    Messages:
    1,016
    Likes Received:
    38

    Sep 26, 2013

    I'm throwing my hat in on documentation. I understand how frustrating it can be though. I had a student who did this last year to an amazing degree. Administration was totally in my corner, but he even convinced his mom that I was "picking on him" (by telling him to stop wandering around and talking during my lecture!) and she would call the school and demand that I stop "hating" her child!

    He had his mom so wrapped around his finger that once, when I told him that he'd be receiving a phone call home for telling the class that he'd "gotten drunk and high" over winter break as his 'good time', he said "that's ok; I'll tell her you're lying and she'll believe me."

    I never got the kid to admit that I wasn't picking on him and the mom had him pulled out of my class because I was "so nasty to her baby," but I had the documentation to back up what I was reporting, so I was fine.
     
  8. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,005

    Sep 26, 2013

    A student used to claim that I was singling him out last year, and when I looked deep down, I realized that I was singling him out. I was visibly treating him differently than the rest of the class because I wasn't being consistent with my classroom management plan. Once I realized that and fixed it, and made sure everyone was accountable for the same rules, his complaints ceased, and he took more responsibility for his behavior.

    But I'm sure that there are some students who would claim that you are singling them out even if you were visibly holding everyone accountable for the rules. In those cases, I would definitely do as Alice suggested, and simply not take it seriously. If their claims cause the rest of the class to raise an eyebrow, then you should be confident that your actions have been correct in this matter.
     
  9. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,328
    Likes Received:
    570

    Sep 26, 2013

    I wouldn't worry about it one second more. I had a boy say the same thing about me. Thankfully it was well into my career and my administration knew me well enough to know it was bogus. The kicker was when during a parent meeting the mother called me out in front of all the other parents in the room. I was mortified at first. Until one of the kid's friends, who was there, spoke up and told the mother that she was wrong - that her kid was always acting up and I was more than fair in the classroom. It made me feel like a million bucks!
     
  10. Ms.SLS

    Ms.SLS Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2011
    Messages:
    681
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 26, 2013

    I came up with a little check list for each day of the week with 20 or so behaviors a "good student' exhibits. I give a copy to the kid to track their own progress, I do a copy myself, and at the end of the week we compare results and talk about what behaviors we need to work on. It's good for 7th-9th grade, but I don't know about any older than that.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 279 (members: 1, guests: 250, robots: 28)
test