Blacklisting?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by daisekihan, Feb 10, 2010.

  1. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    Feb 12, 2010

    I think that would be a good place to start. Volunteer and get good ref through there. It will be a step in the right direction.
     
  2. guest_teacher

    guest_teacher Rookie

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    Feb 12, 2010

    Blacklisting is real.

    Human resource professionals communicate on two levels -- formal and informal. When asked formally why you left, the HR representative from your old school will not disclose the reason. When asked informally, the HR representative will tell. It doesn't take much for HR professionals to lapse into the informal. They need not be friends; just having the same job title can create an affinity.

    There is no need for you to disclose your job with the old school on your resume. Your resume is an advertisement, and should emphasize the positive. Your choice of references is also up to you. Choose references whose comments are unequivocally positive.

    If, however, you are asked to disclose past teaching jobs on an application form, it is wise to do so. The information probably turns up in background checks. It's insidious, but credit reports list the names of entities that have previously inquired about you. If your old school conducted a background check on you at the time you were hired, the school's name will probably show up on future reports. The teacher certification authorities in some states also track assignment information, and it's not hard to imagine that this information could be shared.

    Other people have given good suggestions about shifting attention away from this bad experience when you fill out an application and go in for an interview. (Don't let anyone criticize you, by the way. You spoke sharply in a tense situation. This is understandable. Moreover, if a gunman had been outside your classroom and your threat had helped your students stay quiet and avoid detection, everyone would be applauding you.)

    I would say that it is a bit early to contemplate moving across the country, downgrading your professional goals, or pausing to get an advanced degree. The kind of principal you actually want to work for will understand that no candidate is perfect.
     
  3. daisekihan

    daisekihan Rookie

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    Feb 13, 2010

    Thank you so much. That's exactly the kind of thing I was worried about. I guess I'll need to disclose it without fail then.
     

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