Best most effective way to teach time

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by Tek, May 13, 2013.

  1. Tek

    Tek Comrade

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    May 13, 2013

    I'm starting my telling time portion of my math curriculum on Tuesday, and was wondering if there's any secret in teachng this effectively versus giving them a very dry run-through of what the little and long arms mean.

    Also, I only have one adjustable clock in my room unfortunately. I wish I had one for all my students to tinker with.

    Right now, all I got is the worksheet inside the math book. I somehow would like to teach it more hands-on. Any ideas?
     
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  3. HOPE-fulTeacher

    HOPE-fulTeacher Comrade

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    May 14, 2013

    When I'm first introducing time, I do just go through what the hands mean and we practice a lot of times to the hour. I am fortunate enough to have small clocks for my students, so that does make it more engaging. You could have your students make small clocks out of paper plates, pieces of cardstock/paper for the hands, and a brad to hold down the hands in the middle. I would make sure to write the numbers for them, so they don't have to worry about spacing the numbers correctly.

    Once you've done some basic instruction, there are a whole bunch of things you can do with telling time. I have my kids play "Telling Time Tic Tac Toe" where there's a different analog or digital time in each box and they have to say the time to get the square. You could do Telling Time Memory, Matching Analog & Digital Times, go on a "Time Hunt" around the room where they find cards hidden and have to write down the times that are on them....it's a good topic to get creative with. :) There are also a bunch of good *free* telling time resources on Teachers Pay Teachers, as well as some ones that cost a few bucks.

    Once kids are familiar with time to the hour, I'll introduce time to the half hour. It's often hard for kids to know what hour it is when the hand is between numbers, so they'll need lots of practice with it. I've had a lot of success this year with reminding kids that the hands go around in the order that the numbers go in and asking kids, "What number is it past?" Even my lower kids have gotten it with LOTS of repetition! :)

    One last thing that I'd recommend...if you're curriculum is like mine and it only gives you a week for telling time, try to find a way to fit it in even after you move on to other topics. I pull guided groups as part of my math workshop, so this year, I started my groups by putting a copy of a blank clock face in a dry erase sleeve (or you could laminate it) and having the kids practice drawing and telling times. This especially helped my lower kids master telling time to the hour and half hour, but it also let my higher kids move onto telling time to the 15 minutes, 5 minutes, and even to the minute! There is no way this would've happened had I just dropped it after a week.

    Sorry this post is so long, but hopefully some of it was helpful! Good luck with your unit! :)
     
  4. mkbren88

    mkbren88 Cohort

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    May 14, 2013

    You can use a hula hoop with numbers stuck to the side and the students use their hands to manipulate the time. We've played time bingo and time concentration to match analog to digital. I've also made a huge circle on the floor and set down the numbers 1-12. I then called on a student to be our hour hand and a student to be the minute hand. Their job was to show me the time I told them. It gets them engaged and they had fun.
     
  5. jteachette

    jteachette Comrade

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    May 15, 2013

    Do you have a document camera? I would use the clock on the document camera, and do the worksheets with them on it. My students can tell time, but had difficulty with showing the time on their worksheets, until I used the document camera. They can see exactly where to draw the hands on the clock, something that is difficult to explain when telling time to the half hour.
     
  6. Danny'sNanny

    Danny'sNanny Connoisseur

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    May 16, 2013

    The BEST thing I've ever done (just found it on Pinterest this year, I had the lowest group of kids I've ever had, and the highest % mastery for time)

    Each morning the kids would tape a small piece of paper with four lines on the corner of their desk. Four times during the day, we would stop, look at the clock, and write the time. I'd go around and check/correct during the next lesson. It takes no time at all, is easy to grade, and gives fairly quick feedback.
     
  7. Tek

    Tek Comrade

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    May 17, 2013

    No doc cam unfortunately. Admin says hopefully next year I will get one.

    Thanks for the ideas though, guys! Been using a paper clock the students have been able to manipulate, and most of them seem to be getting it. We'll see about half hours next...
     
  8. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    May 17, 2013

    I do a thing where the children do a lot of things like jumping jacks, writing their name, drinking a glass of water... as teams where they each try and do things in a minute. They really like it usually.
     
  9. Rebel1

    Rebel1 Connoisseur

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    May 18, 2013

    Have them make their own clocks with poster board and brads.
    Make the two hands different colors, then relate it to short; hour, and long; minutes. You can add a second hand to it, which I find very effective in showing how each time the SECOND hand goes around the whole face of the clock, the minute hand moves to the next minute! That can really make them see the connection. Then you talk about how the minute hand travels completely around the face of the clock, AND then the hour hand moves! They will get it in due:D time. Of course you connect in the 60 seconds, 60 minutes, etc, and the five minutes between each number, etc.
    My Pre-Ks have not grasped the latter part yet, but they are slowly getting it. In due :D time!
    Good luck!
    Rebel1
     

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