Bellringers

Discussion in 'Middle School / Junior High' started by AnonyMS, Sep 3, 2011.

  1. AnonyMS

    AnonyMS SpEd Para! BASE room aide! RTI Facilitator!

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    Sep 3, 2011

    Need some ideas on BellRingers for English / Language Arts / Reading class. I want to do the same type of BellRinger every day so the students have a chance to come in and get focused while I watch the hall (we have to be at our door during passing periods until the tardy bell rings), then come in and quickly take attendance. I wish I could have my bellringer be, "Read silently" but my P won't allow it!
     
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  3. Rebel1

    Rebel1 Connoisseur

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    Sep 3, 2011

    -Word Search
    -Crossword Puzzles
    -Refreshing Memory about some of the stuff you've covered
    -Fill in the blanks worksheets; from some of the stuff you have
    not covered yet. This would be a fun one, AND you can see what
    each student's about.

    Rebel1:D
     
  4. Beth2004

    Beth2004 Maven

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    I used to be required to have "do now" work for when the kids came in too and had a really hard time coming up with something that didn't require a ton of copying to prepare for every day. Then, I started having the kids do cursive practice. I wrote an inspirational quote on the board and the kids would write it in cursive in their notebooks. It required very little preparation on my end, the kids had all the materials they needed to do it, and it gave them the cursive practice they needed. Also, the quotes sparked some pretty interesting conversations.
     
  5. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sep 3, 2011

    How about SAT or PSAT questions?
     
  6. Rebel1

    Rebel1 Connoisseur

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    Sep 3, 2011

    Beth,
    I like this.
    It made me remember another Bellringer thingy!:D
    Rebel1
     
  7. AnonyMS

    AnonyMS SpEd Para! BASE room aide! RTI Facilitator!

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    Sep 3, 2011

    I think I'm frustrated b/c we just aren't allowed to do certain things. For example, we aren't allowed to do Word Searches. We aren't allowed to have silent reading. We aren't allowed to do worksheets... and, I have to have a bellringer that can start IMMEDIATELY upon students' entering the room. So, the worksheet thing - unless I spend the last few minutes of the class beforehand, I can't do that b/c the students wouldn't have them RIGHT AWAY when they walk in the room!! A-r-g-h!

    I have to use something that I can project on the front board.

    I don't think I would be allowed to do handwriting practice, either. However, I might be able to do a response to a quote... with them haivng to write it in their journal... but just not say it's "handwriting practice" (but still emphasize that it needs to be neat! LOL).

    Alice - I like that idea. I'll look into that. But not sure it would be allowed, either. Heavy sigh.
     
  8. Rebel1

    Rebel1 Connoisseur

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    Sep 3, 2011

    WWID?:D
    Mignt as well tell the children to lay their heads on their desks and catch UP on some ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZs!;)
    Rebel1
     
  9. Beth2004

    Beth2004 Maven

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    It sounds like journaling might be your best bet. Give them a quote or some other kind of prompt to respond to in their notebooks. If they have the notebooks with them, you won't have to pass anything out to them and they can get started right away.
     
  10. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    Sep 3, 2011

    I do Giggles in the Middle to practice vocab and grammar skills. There's enough in the book to last the entire school year doing one or two a day. The CD that comes with the book has each daily warm-up in a Word file... you just copy & paste to a new document & project from a document camera or copy out onto an overhead sheet.

    The kids like it because it's a continuing story... they get a little piece every day.
     
  11. nstructor

    nstructor Cohort

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    We're only permitted to do test pre type questions. I usually have an interesting nonfiction passage and then ask them an extended response question that follows any of the skills in our curriculum guide-predicting, inferring, summarizing, using context clues, figurative language, author's purpose, view point, etc. . .
     
  12. cmw

    cmw Groupie

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    Sep 3, 2011

    I have a music stand by the door. Students pick up a worksheet on the way in. It's either a topic we're covering or something we've covered. (I'm real big on the students entering quietly & getting right to work.) I also have music playing in the background. :D I've used a couple great books in a reg. classroom setting including Grammar Grabbers,Vocabulary Mind Stretchers, Logical Thinking Skills, and Quick Thinkers. I also love trivia & brain teasers for students. :D
     
  13. emptynest2001

    emptynest2001 New Member

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    Sep 4, 2011

    I used Daily Oral Language for grammar instruction. You can project the sentences onto a board so you do not have to copy them. Students can then copy them into their notebooks in corrected form. I then always had a journal topic related to what we were writing or reading written on the board for them to finish with. They used the first ten minutes of class to do that. DOL also makes Daily Oral Analogies and Vocabulary.
     
  14. roxstar

    roxstar Companion

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    What about a writing prompt of some kind? I know that kids need the opportunity to write as much as possible. Maybe a fun question of the day that might pertain to whatever topic you are covering. Maybe previewing some vocabulary words then opening a discussion about the words.
     
  15. AnonyMS

    AnonyMS SpEd Para! BASE room aide! RTI Facilitator!

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    Sep 5, 2011

    These suggestions helped! I am going to look into the Grammar Grabbers, Mind Stretchers, and Daily Oral Language, Daily Analogies, etc..

    THANKS!
     
  16. Rosy0114

    Rosy0114 Rookie

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    Sep 13, 2011

    GEEZ!! That would be frustrating. Sounds like they want you to fill time, but don't trust you to fill it wisely... and therefore take away all opportunity from the situation! I'm sorry you gotta deal with that.

    How about scanning Shel Silverstein poems or poems from Chicken Soup for a Teenage Soul and having them write a response to it. Sometimes you can have them add on to it... you can have them write a letter to the narrator, argue an opposing side, etc. This way, they are reading, thinking, and writing. Have them keep it in a notebook.

    You can do a 10 pt participation grade for each day based on the following -
    Remains on topic.
    Answers the question.
    Written in the correct format.
    Written from the correct point of view.
    Spelling/Grammar/Punctuation generally correct.
     

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