Bell Ringers/Warm Ups

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by MrsDW, Aug 20, 2007.

  1. MrsDW

    MrsDW Rookie

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    Aug 20, 2007

    I have used these in various forms (correct the sentence, journals, poem of the day, etc.) in my language arts classes, but every year I struggle with how to assess these activities. In the past, I have given points, made worksheets, etc., but it is a LOT of work to go over these each week. However, if I don't give points in some form, I have found that my students will slack on completing the activities. The only thing that seems to work is to give them points for completing them. Anyone have a recommendation for me? How do you assess bell ringer activities (or don't you???) Thanks!
     
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  3. traeh

    traeh Companion

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    Aug 20, 2007

    Make it part of their participation points. I plan on giving each student responsibility points per day. They will receive a score on a scale from 0-3 based on their participation, attentiveness, etc. Correcting homework and the daily bell ringer both factor into this daily grade. Thus, if they don't do it, just deduct points. Therefore, you can simply scan to make sure the kids are putting forth the effort, rather than collecting the bell ringers frequently, which is much too time consuming.
     
  4. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    Aug 20, 2007

    we review ours orally and I give students stickers for sharing answers. They have to have 10 stickers at the end of the marking period, and any more than that are extra credit.
     
  5. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Aug 20, 2007

    Warm-ups go in their binders as the first page for that day. Warm-ups are graded as part of their binder which I grade at the binders (including warm-ups) every three weeks or so (once all work was passed back for that unit) about three times per term each so they have about 15 warm-ups per unit. Each warm-up is graded out of three points: 1 for the warm-up title/date, 1 for completion of warm-up, and 1 for being on target in the response. So the warm-ups total 45 points of the 100 point binder grade. The final 55 points I assign to the completion of all assignments, completion of a table of contents, all assignments in the right order, neatness, assignments are number in the right hand corner, and proper headings.
     
  6. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I collect bellringers as a bunch once they've done about 10, or I'll just count them up and scan them when I'm grading their class binder each unit. I issue 5 points per completed bellringer. Brendan's idea about issuing some of those points for a heading is a good one, and I think I might do that as well.
     
  7. MrsDW

    MrsDW Rookie

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    Thanks for all the great ideas! Here's another question for you...what if the student is absent and misses a warm-up? Does he/she have to make it up? How do you handle that?
     
  8. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I do require students to complete a bellringer activity even if they were absent. On my "Here's what you missed..." form, I include the bellringer topic, and the student is expected to write the entry just as if he or she had been present in class that day.
     
  9. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Aug 21, 2007

    I grade the heading becuase it makes it easier for me to grade and I think it is a good way to get organized for them.
     
  10. new teacher too

    new teacher too Rookie

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    Aug 21, 2007

    Can I ask for an example of a bell-ringer/warm-up for a science class? I hadn't thought of them as being graded.
     
  11. greenbean6

    greenbean6 Companion

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    Aug 21, 2007

    Brendan, would you mind sharing some of yours? I'd love to see a few examples.
     
  12. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Aug 21, 2007

    Sure, these are from my Greece and Rome Unit:

    -In at least three sentences please expalin the social classes in Ancient Athens.
    -Please explain the difference between a Monarchy, Oligarchy, and Aristocracy, in at least three sentnces.
    -In three to five sentences please explain briefly address the philosphies of both Socrates and Aristotle.
    -What time of Government do we have today in the United States? Why? Requires at least a three sentence response.
    -Explain the concept of the Greece Coliseum (Remember its Greek Origins.)
    -Please explain the difference between a Democracy and a Repubilc in at least three sentences.
     
  13. greenbean6

    greenbean6 Companion

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    Aug 22, 2007

    Great, thanks!
     
  14. new teacher too

    new teacher too Rookie

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    Aug 23, 2007

    I'm not familiar with the American system of classroom education. Is this a normal practice, and how often is it used?
     
  15. Charger

    Charger Companion

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    I found a really good web site that has science trivia questions (so that I wouldn't have to make up my own) and I use those for all of my science classes. Even after 2 weeks, I still have to remind my kids to do it as soon as they sit down. I think they have a mental block against it or something.

    I collect their notebooks every two weeks and give them 2 points per question if they have it in their notebook. It's an easy A if they actually do it.

    If the kids are absent, I expect them to get the question from the previous day.
     
  16. ELAteacher

    ELAteacher Rookie

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    Aug 28, 2007

    New Teacher Too,

    A "bell ringer" is a common practice in many American classrooms, primarily at the secondary level. The purpose of a bell ringer is mainly to get the students immediately engaged in work from the moment class starts and they sit down. Usually, the bell ringer of the day is written on the board or some other location. Students get into the routine of getting started on the bell ringer right away. This gets them focused and into 'work mode' while the teacher has a few minutes to take attendance and do other start-of-class tasks.

    Sometimes called "daily warm-ups" or simply journal entries, bell ringers come in many forms and can be either curriculum-based or just for fun!

    Sometimes for a bell ringer, I'll just ask a question about the students' hopes, dreams, favorites, and goals. Other times, the bell ringer is related to the previous day's lesson (a short response). Other times, it may be a quote that they should reflect on and either agree or disagree with. You can basically do whatever you want!

    Typically, bell ringers are done at the start of class and can take anywhere from 5-15 minutes of class time. It's up to you. Most commonly done in English Language Arts classes, but teachers in all disciplines do them as well.

    The question of to grade or not to grade them is up to you. I tend not to read the bell ringers or collect them. Instead, I just circulate the room and make sure everyone is doing them, is writing ENOUGH, and is dating/titling each entry.

    Hope this information helps!
     
  17. new teacher too

    new teacher too Rookie

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    Aug 29, 2007

    Thank you ELAteacher,
    the information you supplied is very helpful. The way you describe it I think it is a really great idea. I will be using it in my classroom.
    cheers
     
  18. SciTeacherNY

    SciTeacherNY Companion

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    Aug 29, 2007

    I do not collect every bell ringer. Instead, I make sure the students understand that these may be collected at any time. Usually during the first month, I collect it every few days. I continue to do so (less frequently though) for the entire school year. Therefore students never know if I am going to collect it or not.
     

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