Being firm and fair but getting lots of attitude?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Nichole906, Sep 18, 2014.

  1. Nichole906

    Nichole906 Rookie

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    Sep 18, 2014

    In the past I've struggled with being fair and consistent with enforcing rules and consequences.

    This year, I feel I've been doing really well in treating each student fairly and very clearly stating and enforcing rules and consequences. I have some chattier classes, and in those classes I've instituted a policy where if they are disruptive they get one warning, then I move their seat. I've done this with several students, and haven't gotten any arguments. However, recently a student whom I used to get along with very well continued to talk to her friend despite my requests for the class to stop talking, so I gave her a warning, then moved her when she continued to talk. Now she won't speak to me, and I've had a couple classes with her since then.

    In another class, a student got extremely upset that she wasn't allowed to leave the classroom (I don't let anyone leave if class started within 10 minutes or is ending in 10 minutes), and exploded with some very loud profanity. Then she refused to talk to me about it and instead chose to go to the office.

    Is this normal? I'm frustrated since I feel like I'm being as fair and consistent as I can be, but students seem to be more negative and giving me more attitude than in previous years. I was hoping being firm, fair, and consistent would help with classroom management....
     
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  3. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Sep 18, 2014

    It's hard to say without seeing it in person, but you will get certain students that blow up in the face of an adult that holds them accountable for the rules. They eventually get over it. You need to continue to do what you know is right, which is being firm and consistent to protect the learning environment of the classroom. If a student is giving you attitude, enact a consequence if that is in your plan and move on with your life. It's their choice to blow up or give you attitude. Most likely they are looking for more attention. In any case, it's not your problem, it's theirs. You're just doing your job.

    The last thing you want to do is give into it. Then they know all they have to do is blow up and give attitude and they'll get their way.

    In the past, when you were being less firm and consistent, did you notice something like the kids were more friendly, but they walked all over you? Or they didn't listen to your requests to stop talking, etc.? If you remain firm and consistent, I think you will notice a lot more students doing what you say, especially if you back up what you say with actual action and consequences.
     
  4. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Sep 19, 2014

    Don't worry about it. This happens to everyone who holds teens accountable. It will happen less and less as students realize you mean business.

    Remember, you aren't there to be their friend. You shouldn't care if they are pouting for a couple of days.
     
  5. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    Sep 19, 2014

    Meh. It happens with teenagers. I make sure I give the student a fresh start in my class each day, a clean slate, no matter how long the student appears to be mad. But, otherwise, I don't worry about it. Most will get over it. For the ones that don't, hopefully there is another teacher or adult in the building that the student connects with.
     
  6. Nichole906

    Nichole906 Rookie

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    Sep 19, 2014

    Thanks for the replies everyone. It has been calmer in my room and seems like a better learning environment. Still working on a couple of crazier classes and some people claiming I'm unfair, but like you all said I'll just keep being fair and consistent and hope it pays off in time!
     
  7. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Sep 20, 2014

    It is very hard not go after the 1 sheep even when 99 are doing the right thing. As has been said, they are teenagers. They do teenagery things sometimes no matter how consistent and appropriate you are.
     
  8. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Sep 20, 2014

    Yeah, that!:thanks::thumb:
     
  9. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Also consider the frequent misuse of the word "fair."

    If I give a pop quiz, many will scream "that's not fair!" If I don't grade everything they produce, some will whine "that's not fair." They seem to think "fair" is synonymous with "what I want."
     
  10. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    This reminds me of when I asked a student about fair treatment from an administrator. She said, "yes, she is fair. I mean, not to everyone, but I get what I want, so that's fair."

    Rolling eyes.
     
  11. mrs.whatsit

    mrs.whatsit Rookie

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    Sep 23, 2014

    Creating a Language Around Positive Behavior Choices

    It is hard to keep calm when students react even when you are being calm and fair. Giving very clear directions is one place to start, leaving no wiggle room for "i didn't hear you" or "you didnt say that."

    What really turned my room around was when I made a behavior rubric that explained how i wanted my students to act. I felt like that was the most explicit way for me to model and share with students how to behave.

    My behavior rubric looked like this. I printed it off and shared it with parents and students.

    This helped in my classroom management and my style of teaching.
     

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